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2 THE MISSION HERALD . . 

I AN U A R Y INDEX «*****«&*<"&^hWh{.<mx~xkk~xkk^x~x^x^xk«<>4"* 

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Bishop's Letter - page 3 | TR 1RTT1R Tl) 9 ^ I 

The "Whys" of the Lord's Supper page 4 X ILLiJi iLllJ\ilJ/ tG> | 

The Divine Gift of Enthusiasm page 5 f . | 

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Diocesan Plans, 1930 -page 6 f | 

The Brotherhood of St. Andrew page 7 | D „ r . XTC , „ | 

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The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, JANUARY. 1930 



No. 1 




BI§hop 9 § Letter 

THE month of December was 
a very busy period for me 
as I had planned an unusually 
heavy schedule, but am happy 
to say that I filled all of my 
appointments and enjoyed ev- 
ery one of the strenuous days. 

On Sunday the first, at 11 a. 
m., I preached, confirmed three persons, present- 
ed by the Rector, Rev. Dr. Robert B. Drane and 
celebrated Holy Communion in St. Paul's Church, 
Edenton. 

In the afternoon I preached in the school at 
Mege, Chowan County, and at night I preached 
and confirmed one person, presented by the Priest 
in charge, Rev. Augustus Hawkins, in St. Ignatius 
Mission, Williamston. 

On Tuesday evening, the third I preached in 
St. Andrews Mission, Greenville. 

On Saturday the seventh I confirmed one per- 
son, presented by the Rev. J. B. Brown, of St. 
Paul's Mission, Washington. On the same after- 
noon I confirmed, four persons, presented by the 
rector, Rev. Stephen Gardner, in St. Peter's 
Church, Washington. 

On Sunday, the eighth, at 11 a. m., I preached 
and confirmed one person, presented by the Dea- 
con in charge, Rev. Worth Wicker, in St. James' 
Church, Belhaven. 

On Sunday evening, I preached and confirmed two 
persons, presented by Mr. Wicker, in St. Mat- 
thews' Church, Yeatesville. 

On Monday evening, the nineth, I preached in 
St. John's Church, Sladesville. 

On Tuesday evening, the tenth, I preached in 
Calvary Church, Swan Quarter. 

On the morning of Wednesday, the eleventh, 
I preached and celebrated Holy Communion in All 
Saints Church, Fairfield. 

On the evening of the same day, I preached and 
confirmed three persons, presented by Mr. Wicker, 
in St. George's Church, Lake Landing. 

On Thursday morning, the twelfth, I ordained 
the Rev. Worth Wicker to the Priesthood and 
celebrated Holy Communion in St. James' Church, 
Belhaven. The helpful and stimulating ordina- 
tion sermon was preached by the Rev. Bertram 



Brown, of Tarboro, and the candidate for the 
Priesthood was presented by the Rev. Dr. Robert 
B. Drane. 

Other Clergymen who were present and took 
part in the service and joined in the imposition 
of hands were, Rev. Messrs. Stephen Gardner. 
Arthur H. Marshall, Joseph N. Bynum, Reginald 
W. Eastman, and Sidney E. Matthews. 

On the evening of the same day, I preached and 
confirmed two persons, presented by the Priest 
in charge. Rev. O. J. McLeod, in St. Mary's Mis- 
sion, Belhaven. 

On Friday, the thirteenth, at 3 p. m., I confirm- 
ed four persons, presented by the Rev. Charles 
E. Williams, and made an address in Galilee Mis- 
sion, Lake Phelps. 

On the same afternoon, at five o'clock, I con- 
firmed two persons, presented by the Rev. Arthur 
H. Marshall, and made an address in St. Luke's 
Church, Roper. 

On the evening of the same day I preached 
and confirmed four persons, presented by the Rev. 
O. J. McLeod, in St. Ann's Mission, Roper. 

On Sunday, the fifteenth, at 11 a. m., I preached 
and confirmed two persons, presented by the rec- 
tor, Rev. George F. Hill, in Christ Church, Eliza- 
beth City. 

On the afternoon of the same day, I preached 
and confirmed three persons, presented by the 
Prie.A in charge, Rev. S. N. Griffith, in St. Phil- 
lip's Mission. Elizabeth City. 

On the evening of the fifteenth, I preached and 
confirmed four persons, pi'esented by the rector, 
Rev. Edward T. Jillson, in Holy Trinity Church, 
Hertford. 

On Tuesday, the seventeenth, I confirmed two 
persons, piv onted by the rector, Rev. Alexander 
Miller, in St. Pauls Church, Wilmington. 

Later in the afternoon, I confirmed one person 
in private for St. Paul's Church, Wilmington, 
presented by Mr. Miller. 

On Sunday, the twenty-second, I preached and 
confirmed five persons, presented by the rector. 
Rev. William O. Cone, in St. Stephen's Church, 
Goldsboro. 

On the afternoon of the twenty-second, I preach- 
ed and confirmed three persons, presented by Mr. 
Cone, in St. George's Church, Pikeville. 

On Christmas Day, I had the privilege of at- 



THE MISSION HERALD 



tending service with my family in St. James' 
Church, Wilmington. 

On Sunday, the twenty-ninth, at 11 a. m., I 
preached in St. Andrew's Church, Wilmington, 
and in the afternoon I had the pleasure of visiting 
for the first time and preaching in our new Mis- 
sion in Delgado Mill Village, Wilmington. This 
Mission is being served helpfully and efficiently 
by Mr, Ashley T. St. Amand, one of our Diocesan 
Lay Readers. 

On January the sixth, the Feast of the Epiph- 
any, I observed the fifteenth anniversary of my 
consecration as Bishop by celebrating the Holy 
Communion in St. Paul's Church, Wilmington. 

Praying that we may have many more happy, 
busy years together and with a heart filled with 
gratitude for your loyalty and friendship, I am. 
Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



The "Whys" of the Lord's Sepper 

t "% 7 HY was not this called "A Lord's Supper" 
» V or, "One of the Lord's Suppers"? Doubt- 
less He ate many suppers with His disciples. 
Yes, but none in which He Himself was the meat 
and drink, none that He commanded them to keep. 
There never was another supper like this ; the 
nearest thing to it would be some instance such- as 
a commander of a beleaguered fortress, who should 
fight his way through a cordon of fierce foes in 
order to bring food and drink to his starving men, 
himself, their deliverer receiving his death-shot 
as he entered the walls with the succor. 

And you can imagine those who had been res- 
cued and fed saying to one another in hushed voic- 
es, as they ate and drank in thankfulness for their 
salvation, "Why. it almost seems as if we were 
fed and strengthened and saved, not by bread and 
drink, but by the life, the very body and blood, 
of our brave deliverer!" 

1. The first "why" of the Sacrament is substi- 
tution. We celebrate the Lord's Supper because 
He gave Himself for us. I read not long ago of a 
husband giving inches of his own skin to be graf- 
ted on the body of his wife who had been horribly 
injured in an accident. It was a dangerous and 
painful operation, but it succeeded. He gave of 
his own body to save the life of her whom he lov- 
ed. Is there not a similarity? Can you imagine 
them celebrating the anniversary of that day ? 

2. The second "why" is obedience. Obedience is 
something we render, sometimes without under- 
standing why we obey. The child, the soldier, the 
citizen, obeys commands and laws they cannot 



understand. It is like this with some of us perhaps 
about the command of Jesus, "This do in remem- 
brance of Me". In *an old church at Valsbol the 
men for centuries followed the practice, when re- 
turning from the Communion, of standing on a 
particular spot and bowing in a certain direction. 
Why they did it, no one knew. But later in clean- 
ing one of the walls, a picture of the Virgin Mary 
was discovered, that had been covered with white 
wash four centuries before; and the worshipers 
continued to bow toward it long after every one 
had forgotten it was there. It was more than emp- 
ty form ; it was the unquestioning obedience of 
an example that, though meaningless was rev- 
erent and looking towards the light. 

3. The third "why" is remembrance. The cup of 
the Sacrament historically is the very cup that 
Jesus held in His hand on that last night. There 
is a story told of a lady stopping before an humb- 
le cottage in a Scotch glen and asking for a cup of 
water, which was supplied. Sometime later it was 
learned that the lady was Queen Victoria. The fact 
that Her Majesty's lips had touched the rim of 
the cup made- it an object of great veneration to 
its owner. She carefully treasured it and gazed 
upon it with reverential feelings to renew her 
memories of that eventful day. And so it is with 
this Sacrament, The simple service is stamped 
■with the impress of Jesus. 

4. The fourth "why" is vital relationship. Sam- 
son's unshorn hair, in fulfillment of his Nazarite 
vow was not the source of his great strength and 
exploits; it was only the visible sign of the vow 
of obedience that connected him vitally with the 
strength of the Almighty. When he foolishly al- 
lowed himself to be shorn by Delilah, it was not 
the points of the scissors that palsied his iron 
muscles ; it was the fact that the cutting was the 
signal that "Jehovah was departed from him" 
that made him as weak as a child. 

What did Paul have in mind when he enjoined 
"Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord and 
in the power of His might"? He meant just what 
the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper means when 
it is thoughtfully, obediently, gratefully, vitally, 
remembered. It was the strenth and might to 
thousands of soldiers at the front who gathered 
under the trees and in open fields and in dug-outs 
to receive the Sacrament before going into battle. 
They did not meet — Presbyterians, Lutherans, 
Episcopalians, Roman Catholics, Methodists — to 
argue as to whether the bread and the wine meant 
the actual presence of Christ or the potential 
presence ; they knelt to take hold upon the living 
Christ and receive from Him the courage of true 
soldiex*s of righteousness. 

"The Brotherhood of St. Andrew", says the 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Living Church, "has been the greatest factor in 
restoring the Holy Communion to a normal place 
in the Church. There has never been a eucharis- 
tic controversy in the brotherhood. The insistence 
on spirituality in connection with the Church con- 
ventions has been largely due to the initiative 
of the brotherhood. The Brotherhood conventions 
have always been centered about the Corporate 
Communion". 

5. The fifth "why" is fellowship. Dr. Jowett 
said "On the very way to the supper-chamber, 
when the Lord was weighed down under the bur- 
den of the world's rejection, the disciples had 
quarrelled one with another as to who should have 
first place in the kingdom He was to establish. 
Each man preferred his own claim, asserted his 
own priority, loudly slighting the claims of all the 
rest. When they reached the house where He 
would partake of the passover with His disciples, 
they found the basin of water and the towel, which 
were the ordinary courtesies arranged for the 
guests who had traveled along the dusty way in 
sandals. It had been the custom for one of the 
twelve to minister to the refreshment of the oth- 
ers, and to wash their feet. They had probably 
taken this service in turn. 

But this night every man of the twelve stalked 
past the utensils, refusing to stoop to this menial 
service after having expressed aspirations to the 
first place, or muttered envy of those who did. 
Every man was above stooping before another. 
So they tramped past these dumb monitors at the 
door, on to their meal. There they sat, every man 
a temple of unholy passions, with the Master 
sorrowful and heavy-hearted in their midst. 

They sat thus until He could bear the burden 
no longer; there must be fellowship or He would 
strangle on what He tried to eat. Then, "He ris- 
eth from supper, took a towel, and girded him- 
self. After that He poureth water into a basin and 
began to wash the disciples' feet". And you know 
the rest. 

After that, with the exception of the one trait- 
or, there was among those disciples a sweet, true, 
loyal, lasting fellowship that suffered through 
prisons and stripes and persecutions and behead- 
ings. Jesus had accomplished the thing He aimed 
to do — cement Christians together so firmly that 
the dynamite of the world could not shatter the 
band. 

That is the fifth thing for which the Scrament 
of the Lord's Supper should stand in your life. 



TIb<e Divine Gift of Eetlbinsiasim 



• "Well, well, so you're a missionary," said the 
nice old lady, to the missionary speaker just home 
from China. "You look fresh enough. I thought 
they were all shriveled up." 



IN the huge banquet tendered Thomas A Edison, 
in honor of his achievements and in celebra- 
tion of the fiftieth anniversary of the electric light 
and in concurrent parades and speeches through- 
out the Nation, there was presented to every man 
and woman in the world an object lesson in that 
fundamental quality which underlies the accom- 
plishments of every truly great man. 

It was a lesson in the simple quality of enthusi- 
asm. It is the youngster, one automatically thinks, 
who possesses the greatest supply of enthusiasm ; 
and upon his elders developes the role of conser- 
vative, cold-blooded calculation, of checkmating- 
the hot and daring and intense efforts of ado- 
lescence. 

Youth is an age of enthusiasm ; that much is 
true. But youth holds by no means a monopoly 
upon that driving flame which burns in the heart 
and mind and body, spurring them on long past 
normal endurance, inciting, them to feats that men 
acclaim as miracles. No one who heard the voice 
of Edison, shaken though it was by emotion and 
years, from the banquet table, could mistake the 
clear ringing note, the vibrant timbre which told 
in an instant's flash that in that man flared that 
divine spark which is enthusiasm for his work. 

Great men, big men, everywhere have it — this 
tremenduous, consuming interest in the work at 
hand. And in exactly the same proportion as they 
have this quality are they great; only in such 
measure are they inspired. Without it, man is 
so much clay — lethargic, sodden, unstirred by 
great dreams and great plans. The astounding 
things are ever done under the lash of inspiration, 
in the heart of enthusiasm ; never are they the 
products of the phlegmatic mind. 

No man not aflame with a single purpose could 
go, as did Edison and his fellow workers, days and 
nights on end, without rest or sleep. No execu- 
tive of a modern business institution, unless he 
be heart and soul consumed with the ideals and 
love for that business, can imbue with like enthu- 
siasm those men whom he directs. 

To every man and woman is given the seed of 
this quality, and according to the way and the 
measure in which they direct and develop it are 
they rewarded. For it can be developed ; in truth, 
it must be developed and it must be guided. Mere 
exuberance, undirected, can deal harm as well as 
good ; but sent into productive channels, it glori- 
fies and enlarges whatever endeavor it touches. 
It is the fervency of the zealot that strikes a spark 
to the cold, dead wood of the calculating material- 
ist and brings forth a glow that may be fanned 



THE MISSION HERALD 



into flame. It is enthusiasm that overlaps the 
obstacles set up by logic and achieves the impos- 
sible. This is what Theodore Roosevelt meant 
when he said : 

"It is not the critic who counts . . . the credit 
belongs to the man who is in the arena; whose 
face is marred by dust and sweat and blood ; . . . 
who knows the great enthusiasms, the great de- 
votions . . . who, at the best, knows at the end of 
the triumph of great achievements ; and who, at 
the worst, if he fails while daring greatly, so that 
his place shall never be with those cold and timid 
souls who know neither victory nor defeat." 

— From Holland's Magazine 



meet you. have a spiritual thrill? Jesus is still 
saying, "And ye shall be . . . witnesses." 



Clear Horizoms 

c. H. Stull 

CHRISTIANITY was spread by those who were 
not ashamed to talk in all places of society. 
That is our history from the days of Christ. After 
Christ, the apostles went everywhere talking — 
talking to people as they found them. After John 
came Polycarp, of whom Irenaeus wrote : "I can 
tell also the very place where the blessed Polycarp 
was accustomed to sit and discourse . . . his con- 
versations with the people, and his familiar inter- 
course with John as he was accustomed to tell, 
as also his familiarity with those that had seen 
the Lord." John had trained Polycarp by person- 
al interviews, just as Polycarp trained Irenaeus. 
Church history says of Origen: "He was posess- 
ed of a certain sweet grace and persuasiveness, 
along with a strange power of constraint." A 
writer says of him: "The day I met Origen be- 
came to me the first day, the most precious of all 
days, since which for the first time the true sun 
began to rise upon me." Our Puritan fathers 
spread the faith by talking — telling their neigh- 
bors the good news. A writer says of one of them : 
'*He talked about another world like one that had 
been there, and had come as a sort of express 
from thence to make a report concerning it." The 
Wesleyans and Quakers were much given to this ; 
and once some Quakers journeyed to St. Peters- 
burg to interview the czar on the subject of re- 
ligion, and left him deeply impressed. 

Today our Churches are suffering a tragic and 
terrible loss of spiritual power, because the dis- 
ciples decline to speak, have no witness to give, 
no experience to talk about. Chesterton wrote 
of the Franciscan friars that "they were perpetu- 
ally coming and going in all the highways and 
byways, seeking to insure that any man who met 
one of them by chance should have a spiritual 
adventure." When you leave the door of your 
Church next Sunday, will some one, chancing to 



RETURN! 



Wo pray — 

"Lord Christ, come down again, 
And dwell with us, the sons of men!" 

Yet why? 

Not for His coming need we pray, 

Since He is with us, night and day; 

Closer than breath, than life, than death. 

Our Lord is here — 

Is waiting, waiting, sad and lonely, 

Waiting ever, waiting only 

Till, with vision clear. 

We forsake our devious ways, 

And come in from the wilderness 

To claim His proffered grace. 

See Him — sad and lonely, waiting — 
For our coming only waiting — 
While, v/ith wilful heart, we still 
Go wandering down the flowery ways, 
And seek our good in every place 
Save where is righteousness; 
And still elect the lower part, 
Lest our own lower selves we thwart 
And make our pleasures less. 

Yes, surely Christ is with us now, 

As truly as when, long ago, 

He put aside His high estate, 

And lived man's life below, 

And dying, left His proxy meet — 

His fuller Self, His Comfort Sweet— 

His Advocate, the Paraclete, 

To make His love complete. 

Not — "God to man Return!" 
But— "Man to God Return!" 
Is man's one need today. 
sons of men, and sons of God, 
The Son of Man, the Son of God 
Stands waiting for you in the Way; 
Heart, life, and soul, 
He claims you whole, 

Today,— Today,— Today ! 
Return ! Return ! 
To Him again, Ye sons of men, 

Return ! 
To Him Who grace alone can give, 
To Him through Whom alone we live, 
Return! Return! 

(From. The Fiery Cross, by John OxcnhamJ 



Diocesans Planus, 1930 



AT a meeting of the clergy in St. Andrews 
Church, Wrightsville Sound, October 16 
and 17. a tentative Continuation Program of 
Evangelism was laid before the clergy pi-esent 
with the consent of the Commission on Evan- 



THE MISSION HERALD 



gelism, and, after full discussion, the following 
Program was unanimously adopted: 

1. Preparation of the whole congregation in 
Epiphany for an intensive effort in Evangelism 
from Septuagesima to Easter. Such preparation 
including : 

a. Discussion Groups for the instruction of 
selected members of the congregation in per- 
sonal work. 

b. Pastoral visiting of every member of 
the congregation, as far as possible, during 
the week before Septuagesima. 

2. Quiet day for the clergy, conducted by the 
Bishop, or someone assigned by him, some day 
before Lent. 

3. The "Open Confirmation Class" plan applied 
from Septuagesima to Easter, preferably, where 
possible, on the Sunday nights during that per- 
iod. 

4. Twilight service in preparation for Easter 
Communion during Holy week. 

5. Special celebration of the Nineteen Hun- 
dreth Anniversary of Pentecost on Whitsunday. 

Special reference is made to the Report of the 
mission in the last Journal of the Diocese. 
Copies of bulletins on Visitation Evangelism and 
Open Confirmation Class can be secured ; also 
copies of cards used in a City-wide Visitation 
in Wilmington. Those of the clergy who may 
be interested in applying this plan in their own 
communities can secure further information as 
to the details of the plan and its resulting ex- 
periences from the Chairman of the Commission. 



NEWS ITEMS FROM THE NATIONAL 
BROTHERHOOD OF ST. ANDREW 



THE Rt. Rev. Charles P. Anderson, D. D., the 
new Presiding Bishop of the Church, has ac- 
cepted the position of Honorary President of the 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew, with a letter saying 
"I have always been the friend of the Brotherhood 
of St. Andrew and have tried to promote it. I re- 
gard the Brotherhood and Brotherhood men as 
a great asset to the Church. 



Three Conferences of leaders of boys in work 
will be held this winter under the auspices of the 
Brotherhood, one at the Church Missions House, 
281 Fourth Avenue, New York, on January 9-10; 
a second at the Claypool Hotel, Indianapolis, on 
February 7-8; and the third at Los Angeles, Feb- 
ruary 14-15. These Conferences will not be limited 
to Brotherhood work, but will consider Church 
work with boys as a whole, although emphasis 
upon the Brotherhood. A number of Bishops and 



leading workers with boys in the Church will 
take part in the program. All of the Conferences 
will be attended by the General Secretary. 



A new edition of the Brotherhood Handbook 
has been isued and may be obtained from the 
National Headquarters. It is not only a Handbook 
for Brotherhood Chapters but is in effect a man- 
ual of men's Evangelistic work in the parish. 



The observance of the National Corporate Com- 
munion for Men and Boys this year was the most 
widespread in the history of the Brotherhood, 
aproximately twenty-five per cent more parishes 
taking part than ever before. 



The next National Junior Convention of the 
Brotherhood will be held the last week in August, 
1930, the place to be announced later. The next 
General Convention, Senior and Junior, will be 
held at Sewanee, probably in July, 1931. 



The Brotherhood is sponsoring a special fund 
for the advanced education of exceptionally prom- 
ising Christian Japanese Students, who come to 
this country to fit themselves for Cristian lead- 
ership on their return to Japan. The fund was 
started by the boys at the National Junior Con- 
vention at Geneva, New York, last August, and 
already, several substantial contributions have 
been received. 



The growing interest in the Brotherhood has 
been manifested by the organization of several 
new Chapters in New Orleans recently. In the 
Diocese of Pennsylvania the territory has been 
divided into ten Districts for the more effective 
promotion of Brotherhood work, and something 
like one hundred of the clergy have recently at- 
tended special conferences to consider Brother- 
hood Chapter organization and methods. 



GO YE APART 



ANNIE W. JAMIE 

Have you taken time in your busy day 

To go aside with Jesus? 

He's in the bustling throng, it's true but He 

would speak alone with you, 
If you but call to him. 

Have you sung a song of hope today 
To some soul in despair? 
Just ask God's grace and seek His face- 
There's cheer and comfort there. 

Oh we must look for Him each day 
Would we but feel His power; 
Well, call on Him, tho' faith be dim,- 
Alone, in the Quiet Hour. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



%k* 41 



tsatmt 



ralh 



A WEEK'S PRAYERS 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription SI. 00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elizabeth, City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. 

1930 PLEDGES 

WHILE we are making our pledges for 1930 
are we thinking of the hard times or of 
the work toward which we are giving? Are we 
basing our pledges on self-interest or on the love 
appeal of Jesus to "GO"? Are we thinking of 
OUR needs or the greater needs of the thousands 
who have nothing, to whom the Church has been 
ministering through your past contributions? 

These and like questions should be prayed over 
before we become satisfied with the pledge we 
have made. 



THE B. S. A. HANDBOOK 

THE new Brotherhood of St. Andrew Hand- 
book contains a great deal of helpful materi- 
al. It can be of great value to every pastor and 
layman whether a member of the Brotherhood 
or not. 

Beginning on page 83 there is given 47 special 
prayers. Beginning on page 96 there are 8 pray- 
ers for private devotions. Beginning on page 98 
there are prayers for family use — not those of 
the Prayer Book. 

There are many other excellent features about 
this new handbook. All the men of the diocese 
would find much help in the study and use of this 
new Brotherhood book. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

ON account of the Diocesan Treasurer's books 
for 1929 not closing on the last day of the 
month, it is impossible to give the financial report 
in this issue. The financial statement will again 
appear in the February number. 



Dividing the world into daily portions in one's 
prayers is found by many people to be a help 
both in praying and in forwarding the Church's 
mission. The Bishop of Arkansas says that he 
thinks on Sunday of the Anglo-Saxon people, the 
Church of England, the dioceses in the United 
States, especially his own. On Monday, Africa, 
especially Liberia, and also the Church's work 
among colored people at home. On Tuesday, In- 
dia. Wednesday, Japan. Thursday, China and 
Korea. Friday, Palestine. Saturday, all the Is- 
lands where our Church is working, Hawaii, the 
Philippines, Cuba, etc., and the Canal Zone. 



OLD PRAYER BOOKS 



A supply of the old Prayer Books is kept in the 
county jail and in the county home, by the Rev. 
H. F. Kloman of Cumberland, Md. After con- 
sulting with the heads of the institutions, it was 
thought well worth while to keep the books where 
they are easily available, with a neat little card 
over them saying, "For free distribution. Take 
one." So these troubled people in long hours of 
confinement will discover the comfort and help 
of which the Prayer Book has so much even when 
used apart from services. 



AN EXCELLENT IDEA 



An idea from China for the Feast of the "Pre- 
sentation in the Temple." On that day, in some 
Chinese parishes there is a special celebration of 
the Holy Communion for godparents, with special 
prayers for them and for their godchildren. 



THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES 



Enrollment at the Church's fifteen theological 
seminaries and training schools for the ministry 
is as follows, including all classes of men enrolled, 
graduate students, special students, etc. 

General . 155 Sewanee .... 17 

Berkeley 28 Philadelphia 61 

Nashotah 39 West ern 30 

Cambridge 36 



Virginia _ 79 

Seabury . 25 



Bishop Payne 11 

Delancey 11 

Pacific 9 Greeley 32 

Bexley 26 DuBose . 29 

The total number is 588. Last year it was 551 ; 
the year before, 546. The two seminaries which 
are crowded, General and Virginia, are also the 
two which are most active in the work of recruit- 
ing men for the ministry, in colleges and else- 
where. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



OF SELF-DEDICATION 



SAINT AUGUSTINE 



Arranged in hymn form by 
FRANCES RIDLEY HAVERGAL, 1874- 



"Take my life and let it be 
Consecrated Lord to Thee. 

Take ray moments and my days 
Let them pass in endless praise. 

Take my eyes and let them see 
Souls that may be saved for Thee 

Take my hands and let them move 
At the impulse of Thy love 

Take my feet and let them be 
Bent on works of love for Thee 

Take my voice and let me sing 
Prayers and praises to my king 

Take my lips and let them be 
Filled with messages from Thee 

Thus my life will truly be 
Consecrated Lord to Thee." 



TWO PRAYERS FOR THE NEW YEAR 

By Ethel Arnold Tilden 



A Prayer For Night 

SET my heart free from bitterness. O God, 
Now it is night — 
Free from those unlaid ghosts of hurt and pain 

That haunt the light ; 
Forgive my faults and let me sleep, 

Now day is through, 
And in unbroken peace abide this night 
Close unto You. 

A Prayer For Morning 

Let me not look behind night's pause of peace, 

Now it is day; 
With courage and with joy let me go forth 

Anew, I pray; 
Resolved that I will strive, as my strength is, 

To do my part, 
Each hour with kindness, and sincerety, 

And a high heart ! 

— Good Housekeeping, New York. 



PARAGRAPH NEWS 

The Rev. R. C. Masterton, rector of Trinity 
Church, Lumberton, leaves this month for Wash- 
ington, D. C, to take charge of the Church of the 
Advent. 



The Rev. B. W. Gaither, rector of the Church 
of the Holy Cross, Aurora, left this month for 
Hopkinsville, Kentucky, to take charge of Grace 
Church. 



The Rev. R. W. Eastman, rector of St. Mary's 
Church, Gatesville, left this month for Virginia 
Beach, Va., to take charge of Galilee Chapel. 



The Rev. and Mrs. A. J. Mackie, of Windsor, 
spent Christmas at Mrs. Mackie's home at Will- 
iamsport, Pa. 



The Rev. A. J. Mackie was called to his oid 
home during the month by the death of his 
brother who was buried at Buffalo, N. Y. 



SOCIAL AT ST. PHILIPS' CHURCH 



A very delightful affair was given at St. Philip's 
Church on New Year's night. The Church was 
decorated with evergreens. 

The class of Mrs. Pearl Newell and Miss Estelle 
Peoples gave a very entertaining play. Those 
taking part were Mr. and Mrs. Archie Johnson, 
Miss Ruby Beal, Miss Heida Coats, Miss Frances 
Powell, Pattie Johnson, Nanette McGinnis, Bill 
Andrews and Ella Rose Blanchard. Mr. Stephen 
G. Worth rendered several numbers at the piano. 

A large number of guests attended this enjoy- 
able affair. 

HOWARD ALLIGOOD 



ST. MARY'S PARISH, KINSTON 



WE are glad to say, repairs on St. Mary's, 
Kinston, has been completed and three new 
memorial windows installed iust before the Christ- 
mas season. 

The Church is now more attractive on the in- 
terior than before the fire last spring ; good many 
changes and improvements having been made. 
The memorial windows are given as memorials to 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Harvey, Mr. Haskett, and 
a son of Judge Rountree, of Wilmington. All 
three windows are very handsome and appropri- 
ate. 



St. Mary's Vestry, Kinston, has called as tem- 
porary rector, the Rev. Dr. W. A. Pearman, of 
Bedford City, Va., to supply until the arrival next 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



spring, of the Rev. Dr. Bartholamew Huske, whom 
the Vestry called last fall. Dr. Huske is now in 
the Navy, stationed at Annapolis. He accepted 
the call to St. Mary's and will take up the work 
in Kinston after May 1st. 

St. Mary's is very fortunate, indeed, to have Dr. 
Pearman with us to assist in carrying on the work 
of the Parish until our regular rector comes to us. 



We feel very proud of our Young People's Ser- 
vice League, at St. Mary's. We now have three 
young men who, in the absence of the rector, 
took the service on Christmas morning. The 
Jeffries twins, sons of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Jeffries, 
conducted the services and one gave a short ad- 
dress on Service. 

LEON H. SUGG 



GOOD SHEPHERD, TOLAR-HART 



CHRISTMAS passed off quietly here. The mill 
has run all fall and winter until now, and 
Christmas found the community in fine shape 
for a week's shut-down. 

We had our Christmas tree Monday night be- 
fore Christmas and a Pageant, "Oh, Worship The 
King," and a play, "Merry Christmas," were pre- 
sented at the same time. Some fifty children 
took part in these plays and deserve much credit 
for playing their parts so well. The presents for 
our Mission were furnished by the Diocese of 
Missouri. A large number attended and enjoyed 
the entertainment. 



FROM NEW BERN 



FOR the first time in many years, a Commun- 
ity Christmas Tree was lighted in New Bern. 
The tree, a large cedar, was placed in Christ 
Churchyard at the busiest corner in town and 
lighted by the city of New Bern. The service of 
lighting was arranged by the Rev. Guy H. Ma- 
dara, Rector of Christ Church, and participated 
in by the pastors of the various churches of the 
city. Despite the cold, the appeal of this relig- 
ious observance in the shopping center of town 
was very marked, and the sidewalks were crowd- 
ed. Printed copies of the service were distributed 
by the Boy Scouts. 



ST. PAUL'S, EDENTON 



BY the removal of Mr. R. G. Shackell and family 
to New York, St. Paul's Vestry lost a good 
member. The vacancy has been filled by the 
election of Mr. M. H. Dixon. 

On Holy Innocents Day, the children enjoyed 
a Pageant. "Going to Bethlehem", followed by a 



Christmas tree. Many Christmas stockings had 
been filled and distributed, Christmas Eve, by the 
Young People's Church Service League. 

Our Rector is bemoaning the removal from the 
Diocese of his neighbor and friend, Rev. R. W. 
Eastman, who has accepted charge of the Church 
at Virginia Beach. 



ST PETER'S CHURCH, WASHINGTON 

THE Children's Christmas Seiwice was held in 
the auditorium of the Parish House on the 
afternoon of the Sunday immediately before 
Christmas Day. A Christmas tree was on the 
stage illumined with electric lights. The rector 
of the Parish conducted the devotional services. 
The children sang the Christmas carols which 
were shown on the screen. Dicken's "Christmas 
Carol", a three reel moving picture portrayal was 
shown on the screen. A bag of candy was pre- 
sented to every one present. 

Norman Cordon, Jr., the possessor of a rich 
bass voice which will have an audition in the near 
future in the Metropolitan Opera House, New 
York City, was the soloist at the morning service 
on the first Sunday after Christmas and again 
on the second Sunday after Christmas. He was 
heard again on the evening of the second Sunday 
after Christmas when the choir at St. Peter's 
Church rendered the beautiful sacred Cantata, 
"Bethlehem," by Maunder. The other soloists in 
this Cantata were Miss Zelma Russ, Ben Taylor 
and the Rev. Stephen Gardner. The Church was 
packed to its capacity, the gallery, the vestibule, 
the vestry room all being occupied. Music lovers 
from Elizabeth City, Hertford, Edenton, William- 
ston and other places were in the congregation 
which was estimated as containing six hundred 
people. Several hundred others tried to gain ad- 
mission but were unable. Mr. Cordon is a grand- 
son of the late Rev. Thomas Haughton, who serv- 
ed in the Diocese of East Carolina for a long num- 
ber of years. 

The Parish mourns the passing of Mrs. Athalia 
Cotten Tayloe, the wife of Dr. David Tayloe, Sr., 
and Frank Havens Bryan, Mrs. Laura Cox Hod- 
ges, and Judge Stephen Cambreleng Bragaw. May 
they rest in peace. 



PAGEANT IN CHRIST CHURCH 
ELIZABETH CITY 



"The Nativity" pageant was given in Christ 
Church on Christmias eve night to a full Church. 
About fifty persons took part. The prophets of 
the Old Testament came making their prophecies 
regarding the Messiah. The .shepherds came to 



THE MISSION HERALD 



11 



the manger in prayer. The wise men came with 
their symbolic gifts. 

The pageant included most of the Christmas 
hymns and carols and was wonderfully worked 
out in every detail. The costumes were perfect. 

At the close of the pageant the congregation 
left the Church in silence deeply impressed by 
the reverent tone of the portrayal, feeling the 
religious value of the whole. 

The pageant was given under the able direction 
of Miss Hattie Harney. 






Wooiae 9 § Auxiliary 

Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Publicity Chairman 

TtvVtWVWttVVVVtVVtVVVVVtVtVVVVVVVV 

CONVOCATION AT WINTERVILLE 



Bishop Darst, at the Convocation at Winter- 
ville, stressed the importance of the work dis- 
cussed by Mrs. Harry Walker and gave an in- 
teresting account of a little colored girl who is be- 
ing trained to work among her people. The Bishop 
also spoke of the men from this diocese who are 
training for the ministry and made the state- 
ment that East Carolina has more young men 
training for the ministry than any other Southern 
diocese at this time. 

Bishop Darst stated that the Church usually 
reaches its greatest ascendancy when finances are 
at their lowest ebb and that the time is ripe for 
the work of the Church to go forward, but, the 
individual member of the Church must sound 
that loud and definite note of loyalty to Jesus 
Christ before any great good can be accomplished. 

The Rev. W. R. Noe, in his address at the Con- 
vocation in Winterville, asked that every man, 
woman and child in the diocese stand back of the 
Church's Program. Mr. Noe's statement. that the 
financial depression was not the cause of the fail- 
ure of some places to meet their obligations to 
the Diocese and General Church, evidenced the 
fact that the parishes in the localities hardest 
hit by adversity had met their pledges while other 
places which had suffered little had failed to do 
their part, brought home to all of us the realiza- 
tion that indifference still has a strangle hold on 
some of us. 



THE AUXILIARY OF ST. GEORGE'S PARISH 
MIDDLETOWN, N. C. 



WE have worked hard and continuously to 
meet the requirements of our little band 
of faithful workers. I say faithful because they 
surely are, for they worked all the year and took 
no vacation through the summer months. We are 
scattered over right much territory and many 
times have to work at great disadvantage and in 
various ways to meet our assessments, etc. We 
have a birthday box in which each member of the 
Auxiliary, as her birthday rolls around, drops a 
penny for each year she is old. We open this 
box once a year. We each give Sunday eggs for 
a stated time and twice this year we have each 
given a hen and have a certain day to collect 
them and either sell here or ship them. It is 
surprising how they count in dollars and cents. 
We have "market days" and sell vegetables, eggs, 
butter, ice cream, sandwiches, and, in fact, any- 
thing in that line which we can contribute. 

As the year 1929 draws to a close, we feel grati- 
fied to know that our labors have been blessed, 
for we have paid our assessments in full and met 
every other obligation. But, when we have done 
that, it leaves us but very little to spend at home. 
We have been working for two years to buy a 
new carpet for the Church. We are hoping to be 
able to get one by the spring. The Rector's Aid 
Society has recently spent $85.00 on work inside 
the Church which has made a great improvement- 
Mr. Wicker gives us one service each month. The 
Church Army men, Captain Turner and Mr. Lewis, 
held a Mission at St. George's in October, which I 
feel did much good and we enjoyed having them 
and hope they will come again. 

MRS. C. A. MANN 



ST. MARY'S AUXILIARY, GATESVILLE 



Though every member of our Auxiliary has felt 
keenly the financial depression prevalent through- 
out the country, and which stalks in our midst, 
we have not failed to pay our rector's salary, meet 
our apportionment, fulfill our box obligation and 
carry on the work of the Auxiliary with a fine 
spirit of cooperation. 

Our rector, Rev. Reginald Eastman, whose 
splendid qualities of heart and mind have greatly 
endeared him to his parishioners, has been a 
source of inspiration, ever ready to encourage, and 
help in our work. Under his leadership the con- 
gregation has greatly increased in numbers, and 
he is much loved by all denominations throughout 
the town and county, where he is known because 
of his cordial, gracious personality. We are loth 



Iz 



THE MISSION HERALD 



to give him up, yet we feel that in the larger 
.scheme of life, change is a dominant factor, where- 
by some are losers. We shall watch with affection 
and interest his intellectual and spiritual develop- 
ment in this larger field of service to which he has 
been called, and wish him Godspeed in his new 
work. 

The Church has recently been wired, a heatrola 
installed, which, with the old stove, provides ade- 
quate heat on the coldest days. These expendi- 
tures have left us slightly in debt, which we hope 
to liquidate at an early date. We held our annual 
bazaar in December, and gave a subscription party 
during the holidays. We had as our objective last 
year, a new carpet or hardwood floor for the 
Church, but as our efforts failed to materialize, 
we hope for success in the coming year. 

The Church has recently received two memori- 
als. A beautiful candelabra given by Miss Jim- 
mie L. Parker, which graces the altar in loving 
memory of her mother, Mrs. James Parker. Two 
tall eucharistic candles which lend dignity and 
beauty to this sacred shrine, to the glory of God 
and in memory of his mother, have been present- 
ed by Mr. Daughtry Gatling. 

The mission study class has been much inter- 
ested in the study of "Africa." We hope to take 
up "Spiritual Adventuring" for our Lenten work. 
Our United Thank Offering has been especially 
satisfactory during the year. Every member con- 
tributes generously to this phase of the work. 

A Resume of the year's work would be incom- 
plete did it fail to mention the growth in mem- 
bers and interest of our Church School, through 
the faithful, efficient management of our Superin- 
tendent, J. M. Glenn. The students work com- 
prises Christian Nuture Series, Morehouse Pub- 
lishing Co., which they find interesting and com- 
prehensive. Easter and Christmas have been 
appropriately observed with entertainments for 
the children. An Easter offering of $20.00 was 
given, $13.75 was sent to Thompson Orphanage, 
and money donated to other causes throughout 
the year. Thanking God for past achievement, 
we take courage as we face the New Year and 
press on to a higher goal of usefulness and Spiritu- 
ality. For those who are despondent, weary in 
good works, critical of results, I would like to 
quote the following poem: 

What can we do, o'er whom the unbeholden 
Hangs in a night with which we can not cope? 
What but look sunward, and with faces golden 
Speak to each other softly with a hope ? 

Can it be true, the grace He is declaring? 



Oh, let us trust Him, for His words are fair 
Man, what is this, and why art thou despairing ? 
God shall forgive thee all, but they despair. 

Quick, in a moment, infinite, forever, 
Send an arousal better than I pray 
Give me a grace upon the faint endeavor 
Souls for my hire, and Pentecost today. 

Eager and faint, compassionate and lonely, 
These in their hours shall prophesy again 
This is His will, who has endured, and only, 
Send an arousal better than I pray 



CHRISTIAN SOCIAL SERVICE 



2 are going to consider for a few minutes 
Christian Social Service and what it really 
means. Let us think of the meaning of each of 
these words. Service means "help - to work for 
— to aid". Social means "companionable — friend- 
ly". Christian means "of, or like Christ". So let us 
think of this Department as one that is working 
for others, trying to be friendly, striving al- 
ways to be as friendly as Christ, and let us remem- 
ber too, that no Gospel is effective unless it is 
Social. 

We need no great Committee or Organization, 
these very names often frighten us, and too much 
organization takes away from the heart and soul 
of our work. But let us each one consider our- 
selves a committee of One to try out this Friend- 
liness and pass it on to someone else. Let us not 
feel that we must have a regular Program for 
our direction, but let us conscientiously "Stand 
up and Look around" our own Parishes, and then 
let us go out to do the things that need us. 

Our Leaders, from the Presiding Bishop down, 
are urging us to put "First Things First", so let 
us strive in our daily lives to keep this thought 
in our minds, and to remember that each Depart- 
ment is working toward the same end — the 
growth and developement- of the work as a Whole. 

We are constantly having to choose between 
Duty and Pleasure - not just a question of wheth- 
er we shall be present at some Church Service 
or Auxiliary meeting, instead of keeping some 
definate Social engagement - but the question 
and choice of putting First Things First, of de- 
veloping the worthwhile side of our natures and 
character and of using our energies and employ- 
ing our time in such a way as to be a credit to our 
Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. How much are we 
doing each to help make possible the coming of 
the Kingdom of God for which we pray daily? 

Let us all use more fully the Meditations on Our 
Lord's Prayer and after praying "Thy Kingdom 



THE MISSION HERALD 



13 



come, Thy Will be done on Earth as is in Heav- 
en", let us strive to know and do that Will and 
not go about our lives in a selfish way, remem- 
bering always that "unless our religion has some 
effect on our fellowman, then it has no influence 
on us". 

Let us, in the name of Christian Social Serv- 
ice, a Friendly Service, and a Loving Gospel, min- 
ister to someone else and so know the joy of put- 
ting First Things First, of considering someone 
else before our own pleasure, and so helping to 
bring to pass the Kingdom of God on this Earth. 
RENA ROSE OUTLAND, 
Chairman Christian Social Service Dept. 



U. T. O. MESSAGE 



A Message Given the Women at the Convocation 
of Edenton, Held at Winterville, N. C. 



Madam President, Women of the Auxiliary and 
Gentlemen of the Clergy : 

I wish to express my pleasure, first of all, at 
being in the Coxs' Church today, out of which 
has .flown such a fine spirit of consecration and 
faithfulness to duty that we all feel inspired be- 
cause of it. Also, this Church has given us a 
United Thank Offering missionary to China, Miss 
Venetia Cox, in whom we feel a personal interest. 

The privilege of coming before the Convocation 
of Edenton for the first time as Diocesan Custo- 
dian of the United Thank Offering is not lightly 
esteemed, for it is no small thing to be directly 
associated with the splendid women of the Dio- 
cesan Family, to work with them and the fine 
women of East Carolina in spreading Christ's 
Kingdom on earth. 

Do we actually realize that we, in our small 
way, are doing that when we drop our coins in 
our Blue Boxes ? That we are spreading our 
blessings wherever the U. T. O. sends its workers ? 

How far our blessings exceed our thankfulness ! 

I earnestly beg that the little Blue Box be 
REGULARLY used ; and, while I have suggested 
dropping the gift in at noon, when prayers for 
missions are being offered all over the country, 
that suggestion is elastic; if you happen to be 
out of place at that hour, and feel the urge to 
make a thankful gift. 

It was decided at the Convocation of Wilming- 
ton, at Seven Springs, to continue the use of the 
blue envelopes, and I want to express on that 
subject here, today. (Decided in the affirmative, 
also.) 



Please, Parish Treasurers, see that no woman 
in your parish is without a Blue Box and urge a 
regular use of it, not forgetting the prayer with 
the gift. 

If every woman in our Church in the United 
States would drop even a penny a day in her Blue 
Box, the amount from our half a million women 
in one year would be $1,825,000 and three times 
that or $5,470,000 during the Triennium. 

That will never happen as long as we wait un- 
til the last minute to put a dollar, more or less, 
hastily in the envelope for the Offering, in which 
case the thankful spirit of the giver is lost as 
well as the prayerful giving. This is primarily 
a joyful gift, for it is over and above any assess- 
ment or obligation, and that is why the United 
Thank Offering is so beautiful. 

Dont forget our goal: That every U. T. O. giv- 
er enlist one more. Also don't fail to ask that one 
U. T. O. program be given in your Auxiliary dur- 
ing the year so as to inform the women as to the 
objectives of the present Triennium as well as 
the established work and workers. As Mrs. Adams 
so strongly protests, please do not confuse the 
objects of Corporate Gift of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary with our U. T. O. objectives, which I shall 
now give. 



U. T. O. OBJECTIVE FOR THE PRESENT 
TRIENNIUM— 1929-'30 



$15,000 to Vocational School for Indian Boys 
and Girls, Cass Lake, Minn. 

$20,000 to Appalachian School for Mountain 
Children, Penland, N. C. 

$5,000 to rebuild Church at Del Ray Beach, 
Florida. 

$25,000 to St. Catherine's School, San Juan, 
Porto Rico. 

$20,000 to St. Margaret's House, Berkley, CaL, 
(at Church Training School). 

$30,000 for Nurse's Home, St. Augustine's, 
Raleigh ; also, as the U. T. O. had amounted to 
more than $1,000,000 that $50,000 be given for 
a chapel to serve St. Margaret's School in Tokyo, 
Japan, making a total of $165,000 for Advance 
Work. 

It seems, as I have thought things over, much 
wiser to have the consecration of our United 
Thank Offering with a Sunday service, either 
morning or evening, for often, when had on a 
week day, empty pews witness to the pitiful, lack 
of attendance, and the service is far too signifi- 



14 THE M ISSION HERALD 

cant and important for that. It would take up think we need." Be sure and put every article call- 
very little time at a Sunday service, with or with- ed for in every box sent. 

out the Holy Communion, as local conditions After filling- the regular allotment a society 

might dictate. wants to do some extra work, there is always a 

If you need Blue Boxes or envelopes let me call for good, clean, second-hand clothing, hos- 

know and I promise prompt response. Leaflets pital supplies, layettes, etc. In collecting second- 

W. A. 123, 104, 117 and 100, at a few cents each, hand clothing it must be remembered that they 

can be had from the Book Store, 281 Fourth Ave., have to be clean and in good condition. Your Con- 

N. Y. and are splendidly informing and interest- vocational Supply Secretary Mill be glad to fur- 

ing. Information is what creates interest, don't msh you with a list of suggestions for hospital 

forget that. supplies, layettes, etc. Please send articles for the 

The amount of the fall Offering to date (Dec. Bureau of Supplies to your Convocational Sup- 

5) is $1584.74, making a total on hand, includ- P lv Secretary. 

ing the $2025.00 turned over to me by Mrs. Stat- ELIZABETH G. GRIFFIN, 

on of $3609.74. All parishes have not been heard Supply Secretary 

from, but I know thev will be. ~~ " 

MRS. CHARLES J. SAWYER. NEWS ° F SAINT MAR ^ SCH00L ' RALEIGH 
Diocesan Custodian, U. T. O.. Alumnae Secretary 

Windsor, N. C. Miss Meia RoyalJj of Go i dsboro> is the first 

BOX WORK executive secretary for the Alumnae Association 

of Saint Mary's School. Miss Royall is particu- 

HAS it ever occurred to us just how the box ]arly fitted for the Position because she, herself, 

work is handled? 1S a Samt Mar - V ' s # irl > having graduated with 

„„ ,, , ' . ... , ,, highest honors in the class of 1927. In 1929 

When the appeals for clothing, etc., from the , . , . „ , , ,, TT . 

,. , , ,, , .,, ,, ix 4.1. u- u sne received an A. B. degree from the University 

fields are all sent with the approval of the bish- , XT ,, „ ,. , . . . , ,, 

, XT , . , . o 4. -xt of Nort n Carolina where she was president of the 

ops to our National Supply Secretary in New ,,, , . ... ., . r . , , 

v , . n i 4.1. i 4 A , j-^ 4 Woman s Association. She is a member of the 

York, she in turn allots the work to the different p. R , p , . „ , ., 

dioceses. Then, in turn, each of these allotments c . ... ,' ,. . T , ... _ 

. ,. ... ,. , . , .„ . Since taking up her duties in July, Miss Royall 

are subdivided so that each society will have a , , , , 

..... has started nineteen new alumnae chapters in 

share in the work. XT ,, „ ,. ,, „ ,. , _ . _. 

North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The 

These allotments are made with an educational chapters with their organizers are: 

plan in mind. Stations are allotted to different dio- l. Columbia, S. C, Mrs. James A. Catchcart 

ceses and missionary districts in order that the 2. Florence, S. C, _ Mrs. P. A. Wilcox 

women may become interested in various parts 3. Atlanta, Ga., Mrs. Leigh Skinner 

of the field and in time come to see the work as 4. Greenville, S. C, Mrs. Joseph G. Reading 

a whole. The parish which works for one particu- 5. Goldsboro, N. C, Mrs. R. B. Miller 

lar station each year comes in time to focus its 6 Pittsboro, N. C, .Miss Emily Taylor 

interest only on that part of the work as though 7. Wilson, N. C, Mrs. H. R. Swartzell 

it represented the whole of the Church's Mission. 8. Rocky Mount, N. C. _ Mrs. R. B. Davis 

This year East Carolina has been assigned St. 9 - Fayetteville, N. C, Mrs. R. M. Wooten 

John's Mission, Christiansted, St. Croix, Virgin 10. New Bern, N. C, Mrs. J. G. Dunn 

Islands. We should inform ourselves not only a- H- Washington, N. C, Mrs. Stephen Bragaw 

bout the work of this particular mission, but of J 2. Kinston, N. C. Miss Helen B. Chamberlain 

the work in general in the Virgin Islands, that 13- Salisbury, N. C, Miss Betty Ragland 

is, the character of the people, their needs and l4 - Lincolnton, N. C, Miss Laura McDonald 

what the Church is doing to meet these needs. 15. Concord, N. C, Mrs. Jones York 

Short talks can be given while the sewing is be- 16. Morganton, N. C.,__ Mrs. Chase Kisler 

ing done and stories can be read about them. i7 - Weldon, N. C, Miss Mary J. Gregory 

T . . ,, . . 18. Littleton, N. C, Miss Carrie Helen Moore 

It is very important that every societv accept ,_ _ , . T ~ ,.. ,, „. 

„ , , . . . , 1 ,, , J 19. Greensboro, N. C. .. Miss Mary Thui-man 

its allotment and most important that every ar- 
ticle called for is put into the box we are sending. District Alumnae Meeting 
then that particular mission is short just that A district meeting of all Alumnae within a 

much as no other society will send it. Right here radius of fifty miles of Raleigh was held at the 

might well be remembered a remark by a miss- School for the purpose of arousing interest in the 

ionary "send us what we want, not what you Alumnae Association and in the organization of 



THE MISSION HERALD 



15 



more chapters, and the awakening to greater ac- 
tivity, those chapters already in existance. The 
presence of Mrs. Stephen Bragaw, of Washington, 
N. C, president of the general association, added 
much to the interest and the enthusiasm of the 
meeting, which was composed of representatives 
from neighboring towns and a larger Raleigh dele- 
gation. Mrs. I. V. Higham, of Raleigh, past 
president, made a constructive address on the aims 
of the organization. Miss Mela Royall described 
in full the work she has already accomplished, 
and gave her plans for future activities. Miss 
Elizabeth Lawrence, of Raleigh, acted as chair- 
man. 

After the business meeting, some of the stu- 
dents gave a short program gotten up by Miss 
Roxana Eaton, president of the student body, 
and Miss Elizabeth Webb, president of the Senior 
Class. 

The "Broadway", danced by Miss Winifred 
Brickey, was an especially charming skit. Girls 
taking part in the two scenes of Saint Mary's 
"Then and Now", were: Misses Nancy Guff, 
Freeda DePass, Susanne Bennett, May Gilmore, 
Lela Shewmake, Beth Chase, Marion Myers, Julia 
Askew, and Winifred Brickey. 



The Rector of Saint Mary's School was elected 
Vice-President of the Association of Junior Col- 
leges at the annual meeting, at Atlantic City, 
November 19-20. 



"East Carolina has two unsponsored children 

at the Thompson Episcopal home and any one 

wishing to sponsor these children should write 

Miss Elizabeth G. Griffin, New Bern, N. C. Both 

-of these children are little girls." 



"Mrs. Thomas H. Norwood, Goldsboro, N. C. 
is taking up the box work for the Convocation of 
Wilmington starting the first of January. She 
is succeeding Mrs. R. C. Towles of Wilmington." 



MARRIAGE REFORM 



There has been a bill passed by the Legislative 
Assembly in India fixing the minimum marriage 
age at 14, and the age of consent at 16. Educa- 
ted Hindu opinion has for some time past recog- 
nized the need of reform. The last census show- 
ed 218,000 wives and 15,000 widows under five 
years of age, and more than 2,000,000 wives and 
102,000 widows between five and ten vears old. 



The rector of a church on the campus of a lead- 
ing eastern women's college is looking for a wo- 
man to assist him in his work among students. 
She would be appointed under the United Thank 



Offering, and, in addition to their requirements, 
should be a college graduate, possibly with ad- 
ditional training in theology and pastoral care. 
He has been looking for two years. Does anyone 
know where such a person can be found? Corre- 
spondence may be addressed to the national secre- 
tary for college work, the Rev. C. Leslie Glenn, 
281 Fourth Avenue, New York. 



Nothing less than the California Commission 
on Immigration and Housing has issued the follow- 
ing Rules for Treatment of Foreigners : 

Don't snub foreign people. Make friends of 

them. 

Don't laugh at their questions about American 
life. Answer them. 

Don't profit by their ignorance of American 
Law. Help remove it. 

Don't mimic their broken English. Help cor- 
rect it. 

Don't call them offensive nick-names. How 
would you like it yourself? 

Don't make the immigrant hate America. Make 
him love America. In other words, be an Ameri- 
can — and be a Christian. 



The narrow margin of life, the very low stand- 
ard of living, malnutrition and poverty and ig- 
norance, in the crowded Porto Rican population 
have been brought home to us repeatedly for many 
years by our missionaries in Porto Rico. The new 
governor, Theodore Roosevelt, had been in office 
only a few months when he called attention es- 
pecially to the needs of the children, saying, as 
quoted in the Times, "There are in our island now 
thousands of children who lack the necessities of 
life. Many are starving. Thousands of our school 
children have only one meal a day." 

Missionaries struggling anywhere to learn a 
foreign language will have sympathy with Gov- 
ernor Roosevelt, who, speaking bravely in Span- 
ish, recently told his audience that he was "the 
mother of four." 



Tn China there is but one doctor to 400,000 peo- 
ple, says Mr. Firth, outlining the need of St. John's 
Medical School. In the United States there is 
one doctor per thousand potential patients. "It 
is beyond the power of our imagination to picture 
ourselves overcome by disease and having no one 
to give us aid. To us, fever is just a word the 
doctor uses when the baby's temperature is high, 
while to our brothers in China it means the dry 
burning heat of cholera or the scorching fingers 
of malaria. It means knowing that once it lays 
hold of our father or mother, we can call no medi- 
cal aid to our assistance for there is none to call." 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



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D. D., Rector 



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THE MISSION HERALD 



FEBRUARY INDEX 



Bishop's Letter page 3 

Bishop's Appointments for March - page 3 

Honorandi vel Dubitandi . page 4 

Persecution in 1929 page 5 

Orphanage changes name page 6 

Bishop Anderson .. page 6 

Meeting Executive Council _ page 6 

Offerings toward St. Luke's Hospital .. page 7 

Editorials ~ page 8 

Fear Not page 8 

Use of Old Prayer Books .. page 9 

Offerings toward Orphanage - page 9 

Good Shepherd, Wilmington . page 9 

St. Mary's, Kinston . - page 10 

Brotherhood, Elizabeth City page 11 

St. John's. Edenton page 11 

Prayer _ - page 11 

Reproof . - page 11 

Woman's Auxiliary - page 12 

St. Thomas. Windsor _ page 12 

Student Work, Greenville ...page 12 

Advance Work - page 12 

Board Meeting - page 13 

Mrs. Cain's Letter page 14 

Church Periodical Club _ page 14 

Financial Statement page 15 

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"CALL ON US" 



The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, FEBRUARY, 1930 



No. 2 




Bkhop 9 § Letter 

IN keeping with my usual cus- 
tom, I spent the larger part 
o f January a t home, but have 
been quite busy with accumulated 
correspondence, preparing reports 
and working on plans for the com- 
ing year. During the month I 
participated in several services in 
Wilmington and fulfilled the following diocesan 
engagements. 

On Sunday, the nineteenth, I preached and con- 
firmed one person in St. Gabriel's Church, Faison, 
at the morning service, and preached and confirm- 
ed two persons in Calvary Church, Warsaw, in the 
afternoon. 

On Wednesday morning, the twenty-second, I 
presided at a meeting of the Diocesan Executive 
Council in St. James' Parish House, Wilmington. 
On the night of the same day I attended a 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew supper in St. Paul's 
Parish House, Wilmington, and made an address. 

On Saturday, the twenty-fifth, I officiated at a 
marriage in Windsor. 

On Sunday, the twenty-sixth, I preached and 
celebrated Holy Communion in St. Mary's Church, 
Gatesville, at the morning service. 

On the afternoon of the same day I preached 
to a splendid congregation in the Theatre in Ahos- 
kie. Following this service I had an interesting 
meeting with the members of the Episcopal 
Church in Ahoskie at which time plans were for- 
mulated for the carrying on of regular services 
in that progressive town. 

The Rev. Edward T. Jillson, of Hertford, has 
kindly consented to assume the general oversight 
of the Church work in Gates and Hertford Coun- 
ties until a successor to the Rev. R. W. Eastman 
is secured, and Mr. Leon Malone, a student of 
DuBose School, will spend his winter vacation in 
the field, giving special attention to the work at 
Ahoskie. 

The Rev. Frank D. Dean, M. D., will begin an 
eight day mission in Ahoskie on February six- 
teenth, and it is hoped that by the conclusion of 
his visit, plans will have been made for the erect- 
ion of a Parish House on our well located lot. 

On Sunday, February the second, I preached, 
confirmed two persons, presented by the rector, 



Rev. Alfred S. Lawrence, and celebrated Holy 
Communion in the Chapel of the Cross, Chapel 
Hill. 

In the afternoon Ihad the privilege of meeting 
a large number of the students, faculty and towns- 
people at an informal gathering in the Parish 
House and in the evening I addressed St. Hilda's 
Guild, made up of women students, at the Rectory. 

I always enjoy my annual visit to Chapel Hill, 
and I feel that this last visit was especially worth 
while, as I had the pleasure of several talks with 
a great many of our East Carolina studente. 

On Monday, the third, I attended a Parish sup- 
per in St. Mary's Parish House, Kinston, and 
afterwards made an address at a congregational 
meeting in St. Mary's Church. 

The Rev. W. A. Pearman, of Bedford, Virginia, 
who is in temporary charge of St. Mary's Parish, 
has made a splendid impression on the people of 
the Church and community and is preparing the 
way in a most adequate manner for the coming 
of the new rector, Chaplain B. F. Huske, D. D., 
who will enter upon his duties on May first. 

With the earnest prayer that the coming Lenten 
season may prove to be a time of spiritual refresh- 
ment for all of us, and that we may so wisely use 
that period of prayer and self denial, that we may 
come into more loving and sympathetic touch 
with each other and with our blessed Lord than 
ever before, I am, 

Faithfully and affectionately, 
Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST 



PARTIAL LIST OF BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS 
FOR MARCH 



2. Church of the Holy Cross, Aurora, 11 A. M. 

St. John's, Bonnerton, 3:30 P. M. 

Redeemer, Edward, 7:30 P. M. 
9. Holy Trinity, Lumberton, 11 A. M. 

St. Stephen, Red Springs, 3 :30 P. M. 

St. Matthews, Maxton, 7:30 P. M. 

11. Christ Church, Mt. Pleasant, S. C, 8 P. M. 

12. Grace Church, Charleston, S. C, 8 P. M. 
16. St. Paul's Church, Beaufort, 11 A. M. 

St. Andrew's Morehead City, 7 :30 P. M. 
23. St. Mary's Church, Kinston, 11 A. M. 

St. Augustine's, Kinston, 3:30 P. M. 
27. Holy Comforter, Sumter, S. C, 8 P. M. 
30. Beginning Mission in Church of the Good 

Shepherd, Jacksonville, Fla. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Hoeorairidl Vel Duabiitaedli 

Rev. G. W. Lay, D. C. L. 

IN the diocesan Journal for 1929 there is on 
pages 45 to 57 a long report from a joint com- 
mittee appointed by the Executive Council. Its 
preparation required an immense amount of labor 
for which the Diocese owes much gratitude to 
those who drew it up. 

But it contains on page 56 a new plan affecting 
the stipends of the missionary clergy, entitled "A 
Program," to the first part of which I see serious 
objections. This was not acted on, but was left 
for the next convention so as to give opportunity 
for consideration in the meantime. My experi- 
ence is that few take the considerable trouble 
necessary to master such a subject and that many 
are likely to vote for a measure where the names 
of seven such prominent men are signed to it. I 
have also known cases where the men whose names 
were signed had not all of them given the subject 
sufficient consideration. Each member of the con- 
vention is, however, responsible for the correct- 
ness of his decision. I am, therefore, writing this 
now in order to give ample time for study of the 
subject. 

The general policy involved I utterly disapprove 
of, but I shall discuss that later. Let me first 
discuss the absolutely abnormal and impossible 
standards proposed by the committee. 

The "Program" affects all the clergy who re- 
ceive any stipend from diocesan funds. It is 
proposed to classify them into two groups, the 
very good and the rather bad, with a twilight 
zone between. For brevity let us call these two 
the Honor group and the Doubtful group. Three 
items are taken as criteria in making the classi- 
fication, the whole cure, or field of each clergyman 
being taken into account. 

1. Payment of the diocesan apportionment 
for each year of a three year period in full is 
required for qualification for the Honor group. 
Failure in any one year consigns to the Doubt- 
ful group. 

2. A gain in confirmations of 20% for a 
three year period is a neccessary condition 
for qualifying in the Honor group, and a fail- 
ure to gain at least 10% consigns to the 
Doubtful group. 

3. The same as the preceding with regard 
to an increase in the number of pupils in the 
Church School. 

It will be noted that failure in any one of the 
above debars from the Honor group, or consigns 
to the Doubtful group, as the case may be. 

It is not clear to me whether the committee in 
considering conditions 1 and 2 intended to com- 



pare the triennium 1929-31 with the previous 
triennium, 1926-1928, or with 1928 only. I have 
chosen the former for the analysis that follows. 

The percentage of increase to get into the Honor 
group, or to keep out of the Doubtful group, would 
be compounded. That is, if we take the triennium 
1926-1928 as the basis for comparison, the one who 
succeeds in getting into the Honor group and ob- 
taining the $300 raise each triennium would have 
to show an increase in both confirmations and 
pupils in the Church School of at least 20% the 
first triennium, 44% the second and 79% the third. 
To keep out of the Doubtful group one would have 
to show a like increase of at least 10%, 21% and 
33'* for the same periods. It would take unusual 
circumstances to enable even the best of men to 
enjoy the quiet of the twilight zone. 

In order to test the reasonableness of the rate of 
increase demanded by the committee, let us take 
up the matter historically, comparing the records 
for the triennium 1926-1928 with those for that of 
1923-1925. 

As soon as we begin to work this out we find 
that the lowest class of the Committee must meet 
conditions entirely too high for useful discussion. 
We must make a new class for those who have not 
only failed to make a ten percent increase in con- 
firmations and pupils, but have actually failed to 
hold their own. We shall call this class "The Un- 
utterable" group. 

First as to the Diocese as a whole. In no year of 
the triennium 1926-1928 did the Diocese succeed 
in raising its full apportionment. Compared with 
1923-1925 the Diocese showed an actual decrease 
for 1926-1928 of 12l/ 2 % in confirmations and of 
7% in Church School pupils. 

Then as to the self-supporting Parishes. There 
are ten parishes of white people that pay the rec- 
tor a salary of at least the $2,100 which the diocese 
has ordained to be the minimum for a white, mar- 
ried clergyman. Surely one can hardly expect a 
missionary to accomplish more than these ten men 
can in the more compact and populous centres. 
Of these ten parishes eight failed to pay their full 
apportionment in at least one year of the trien- 
nium 1926-1928, and of these three failed for two 
years and two others for all three. As compared 
with 1923-1925 the triennium 1926-1928 shows for 
these ten parishes an average decrease of 8% in 
confirmations and 17% in pupils. Seven parishes 
showed an actual decrease in confirmations, while 
in number of pupils seven showed a decrease and 
one barely held its own, gaining one pupil in three 
years. Four showed a decrease ,n both confirmat- 
ions and in pupils. Not one succeeded in keeping 
out of the unutterable group, while of the ten five 
failed on two counts and four on all three. The 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Doubtful group of the committee did not have a 
candidate and the Honor group must wait for the 
milennium. It is evident that this part of "The 
Program" will not accomplish anything, except 
to mortify some faithful men. 

The part of The Program numbered 3 seems to 
me excellent; but numbers 1 and 2 involve ideas 
that are to me exceedingly repugnant. It seems 
unfeeling, if not cruel, to put a stigma, even by 
implication, on any clergyman who does not come 
up to a mechanical standard. Occasionally one is 
found to be inefficient or unfortunately placed. 
The Bishop can deal with such better than any 
committee. The whole scheme puts spiritual mat- 
ters on a strictly commercial basis. It savors of 
salesmanship on a commission rated according to 
visible results. 

As to condition I, the payment of the diocesan 
apportionment is a duty of the people of the flock, 
and not of their pastor. Obviously he can have 
much influence, but that influence should be in the 
direction of cultivating the interest of his people 
in the great world mission of the Church. The 
mere possibility of having his own financial gain 
considered would weaken his efforts and cause 
some to impugn his motives. This proposed plan is 
only one step less bad than the former one, now 
discarded, whereby the diocese decreased its part 
of the stipend as much as the field fell short of 
paying its share of the stipend and its full appor- 
tionment. 

Condition II is worse still. The object of the plan 
is frankly to get results. I cannot imagine any man 
fit for the ministry being influenced to bring 
more people to confirmation by the hope of fi- 
nancial reward or the fear of being referred to a 
committee. If it did bring results, it would mean 
candidates ill prepared, or lacking conscientious 
motives, or even actuated merely by a desire to 
help the clergyman to get more money. In any 
case it would be embarrassing to feel that some 
would suspect the clergyman of selfish and un- 
spiritual motives. 

Condition III is based on the mistaken idea that 
mere size counts for everything. In all education 
the quality of instruction and the adequacy of 
equipment are far more important than large 
numbers of students. In many cases more pupils 
would mean a poorer Church School. At any rate 
only two of the ten parishes mentioned above 
showed any increase, and in each case of only a 
small fraction of one per cent. 

In conclusion let me say that better salaries for 
the clergy is a subject in which I am intensely in- 
terested. The Diocese treated me better than most. 
I know the relief of receiving a few additional 



hundreds. I am sure the clergy could do better 
work, if they were relieved from some of their 
present financial strain and worry. Everyone of 
the missionary clergy could use a larger stipend 
wisely and for the ultimate advantage of his field 
and of the whole diocese. But I do not approve 
of the way in which our appropriations are not 
made to fit the individual case. The diocese has 
decided that S2100 is the minimum for the mar- 
ried, white missionary. As has often been pointed 
out. this is really the maximum. I see no propri- 
ety in paying the young clergyman, just ordained 
and already married, much earlier than a young 
lawyer or doctor would have deemed it prudent, 
exactly the same stipend as that received by one 
of long experience and proved efficiency with far 
larger financial responsibilities. 

Ultimately it all depends on the awakening of 
the parishes and missions themselves to a sense 
of the need, the opportunity and the responsi- 
bility. If any field will increase its contribution 
to its missionary stipend, the diocese seems to 
be willing to meet it dollar for dollar. There is 
nothing to prevent this being done by the field 
itself at any time, whether the diocese does any- 
thing or not. 



Peirseratioo le 1929 



IF you look at a map of China, in the far north- 
western corner, beyond the missions we are 
familiar with, north of remote Szechuan where 
the two Chinese bishops were consecrated last 
year, beyond the Great Wall and across the moun- 
tain range to the south of Sinkiang, you eventually 
come to the city of Urumtsi. A missionary, H. F. 
Ridley, who has spent nearly forty years among 
the Mohammedans at a point somewhat to the 
southeast, and who is now stationed at Urumtsi, 
went on a preaching tour last year to the neigh- 
boring city of Turfan. 

He arrived in the afternoon, and shortly after- 
ward, accompanied by a Christian, he went on the 
street, gave the Christian the books to look after, 
and took his position on a raised platform. 

"There was a general rush to see the books and 
a good deal of excitement as not many foreigners 
are seen there. I told them I would speak as soon 
as they were quieter. It was soon apparent that 
it was not going to be easy. A Gospel was set on 
fire and brought to my feet, still burning, by a 
student. I took little notice (they expected me to 
be angry), only said what a pity it was to burn a 
book in their own language. It was not my lang- 
uage. This for a moment seemed to cause them to 
think, but soon mud began to be thrown. I said 
"I have come here to perform my duty to give 



THE MISSION HERALD 



you this glad news; the sin would rest upon me 
if I failed in my duty. It will rest on you if you 
refuse to hear". 

"In the face of mud-throwing here and there I 
continued telling them the old, old story, and as 
soon as I was finished and got down, they began 
to crowd around howling and hooting and throwing 
mud. I slowly moved around to a shop and slipped 
in behind the wares and sat down. The shopkeeper 
wanted me to go, I said, "I am a stranger here from 
a far country, and therefore expect courtesy from 
you as citizens and as soon as you disperse the 
crowd, I will go." By and by a soldier came from 
the prince's yamen and took n^e to the inn. The 
big gates closed and all was quiet. We left peace- 
fully the next morning. The Moslem students were 
the instigators of the row". 

In another town the audience, at first attentive, 
was stirred to hostility by a Moslem leader. "One 
place and another", says Mr. Ridley mildly, "mud 
was thrown about a dozen times. It was a new ex- 
perience. However much the Moslems in Sining, 
where I spent thirty years, may have hated the 
Gospel, yet outwardly they were always very 
courteous. Nevertheless, in this five weeks' tour 
I have met many who have been very friendly and 
I was able to sell all my books. A little dispensing 
of medicines seems to me will be the best and 
easiest way to reach them, Backed By Prayers Of 
God's People". 

There are some eight million Moslems in China, 
and not more than six missionaries devoting their 
full time to the work. "Friends of Moslems" is 
the name of a little quarterly newsletter edited 
and published by Mrs. Claud L. Pickens, Jr., 
American Church Mission, Ichang, Hupeh, China. 



ORPHANAGE NAME CHANGES AGAIN 



LAST year the Board of Managers of the 
Thompson Orphanage & Training Institution 
voted to change the name of this Institution to The 
Thompson Episcopal Home. Since then, the new 
name has become widely known and popularized. 
At this year's meeting of the Board, however, 
the Orphanage attorney reported that a change in 
the name of this Institution could not be legally 
made, because of the terms set forth in the Char- 
ter and Deed. 

The purpose of this letter, therefore, is to inform 
you that the legal and proper name of the Orphan- 
age, is The Thompson Orphanage & Training Insti- 
tution, and to request you to employ this termin- 
ology in all your references to this Institution. 
W. H. HARDIN, 

Secretary. 




BISHOP ANDERSON 



TWICE within four months the Episcopal 
Church has been called upon to mourn the 
death of its Presiding Bishop, Charles Palmerston 
Anderson, who, on the morning of January 30th, 
passed into the larger life, was an outstanding 
figure in our Communion and in the Christian 
Church of America. A man of fine physique and 
splendid presence, his personal qualities of mind 
and heart endeared him to all who came in contact 
with him. As a preacher he ranked among the 
leading men in the pulpits of America. Called last 
November to take up the responsibilities of the 
Presiding Bishop of the whole Church, he had be- 
gun his administration with a vigor and wisdom 
which were already winning the confidence of his 
fellow workers. That an administration which 
gave such promise of success should be cut short 
by his lamented death is a tragic misfortune. 

MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COUNCIL, 
JANUARY 22nd., 1930 



THE Treasurer reported that he had sent to 
the General Church for St. Luke's Hospital, 
$1,011.52 and that $3504.22 had been given to the 
Thompson Episcopal Home, including some spec- 
ials, which are not usually credited on the quota 
of the Diocese. He also reported that the Diocese 
had closed the year with a deficit of about $1,700. 
This has since been reduced to about SI, 000. 

On motion of the Chairman of the Committee 
on Apportionment and Appropriations, it was de- 
cided to accept for this year the 1929 apportion- 
ments with the understanding that the matter 
would be given further consideration at the An- 
nual Convention. 

The Rev. W. A. Lillycrop of St. Paul's, Green- 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ville spoke on the work for students at the East 
Carolina College and asked for an appropriation 
of S3,000 for a Student Center. After sympathetic 
consideration, the following resolutions were 
adopted. 

1. Resolved, That having heard with great in- 
terest the plans for a student Center in Green- 
ville, N. C. in connection with the East Carolina 
Training College, as presented by the Rev. W. A. 
Lillycrop, we heartily endorse and approve said 
plan and commend the enterprise to the sympa- 
thetic and generous support of the people of East 
Carolina. 

2. Resolved, That steps be taken at as early a 
date as possible to present the claims of the stud- 
ent work at Greenville, seeking special gifts from 
individuals in the Diocese and other parts of the 
State towards the building of the Student Center 
at Greenville. 

The Rev. W. R. Noe was elected a delegate to 
the National Conference of the Field Department, 
to be held at Racine, Wis., February 4th to 7th 
inclusive. 

The Treasurer was instructed to pay the mis- 
sionary stipends and other expenses of the Dio- 
cese until the meeting of the Annual Convention. 
He was also instructed to notify the National 
Council that we accept the quota of $13,000 for 
1930. 



Onward Christian Soldiers! 



The alarming figure of 
$895,263.00 
was necessary to be paid during December to the 
National Church Treasury to avoid a serious de- 
ficit for 1929. 

$906,116.00 

was sent in instead. Thus for the firtet time there 
was paid in 100% of what the Dioceses told the 
National Council to expect. 

The books for 1929 have been balanced for the 
National Church, and there will be a balance to 
help the National Council's effort to avoid a cut 
in missionary work for 1930. 

The Church Marches On! 



The Igorot people of the Philippines could 
scarcely hope for a better representative than the 
Rev. E. L. Souder, now on furlough, who, address- 
ing the Church Missions House staff recently, and 
speaking in many other places, commends these 
responsive and lovable people, their devotion, their 
reverence, their spiritual earnestness. 



Pictures of Bishop Murray and Bishop Anderson 
like those used on two recent issues of the Church 
at work, but printed in sepia on heavy paper, 
suitable for framing, may be obtained at the Book- 
store, Church Missions House, 281 Fourth Ave., 
New York, at twenty five cents each. 



Offerings From Parishes and Missions of the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina for St. Luke's Inter- 
national Hospital, Tokyo. 



Aurora, Holy Cross S 15.G7 

Aurora, St. Jude's 3.45 

Ayden, St. James' 5.90 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 5.45 

Bear Grass. Trinity Mission 1.33 

Belhaven, St. James' 1.00 

Bonnerton, St. John's 1.00 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 2.00 

Chocowinity, Trinity 3.70 

Creswell, St. David's 14.00 

Edenton, St. John's Evangelist 4.00 

Edward, Redeemer 1.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 33.52 

Fayetteville, St. John's 57.00 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 10.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 16.08 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 20.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's _ 21.04 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 7.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 10.00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 1 3.00 

Jessama, Zion 5.00 

Kinston, St. Augustine's _ 6.85 

Kinston, St. Mary's 10.00 

Lake Landing, St. George's _... .__ 11.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 3.50 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 3.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 5.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 4.78 

Plymouth, Grace Church 4.28 

Roper, St. Luke's 2.75 

Roxobel, St. Mark's ..._._-. 4.25 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 2.00 

Southport, St. Philip's __. 1.25 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 5.00 

Washington, St. Paul's 5.00 

Washington, St. Peter's — 28.13 

Williamston, Advent 31.55 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 11.11 

Wilmington, St. James' . 623.86 

Wilmington, St. John's 56.82 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 5-00 

Windsor, St. Thomas' 3.20 

Winterville, St. Luke's _ 4.55 

Winterville, St. Luke's Ch. School Service League 2.00 

Woodville, Grace Church 14.68 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's .: 1.90 

Total ....$1,092.62 

Disbursements — 

Mission Herald and envelopes $ 91.10 

Mr. Lewis B. Franklin, Treasurer 1,001.52 

Total $1,092.62 



THE MISSION HERALD 



^\\t fflx&xwn^txzdb 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



Subscription §1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. 



VOTING INTELLIGENTLY 

IF each subscriber to the Mission Herald in the 
diocese, especially each rector, will inform him- 
self with the present system of parish apportion- 
ment and then make a study of the plan proposed 
at the last diocesan convention, he will be able to 
vote intelligently in May when the new system 
will again be presented. This is important. Each 
rector should talk it over with his vestry also or 
delegates to the convention. When the question 
comes up we will either know what we are voting 
for or we will not know. Which shall it be? 



PRAYER FOR HOUSE OF BISHOPS 

IT is with sincere grief that we again lose our 
Presiding Bishop. The House of Bishops must 
again meet to elect a Presiding Bishop. This 
office is of such importance in our Church as to 
call every member to his knees in prayer to God 
that He will guide the House of Bishops in their 
selection. On page 36 of the Prayer Book, "A 
Prayer to be used at the Meetings of Convention", 
is a good prayer to use, of course slightly changing 
the words to fit the House of Bishops instead of 
the convention. This prayer or others should be 
said by our people daily. 



WORK— PRAY— LIVE 

IT is good news indeed to know that the National 
Church has no deficit to face in beginning 1930. 
It is a pity that the Diocese of East Carolina must 
begin 1930 with a deficit. It only means that we 
must work more seriously and pray more earnestly 
and live more closely to Jesus during this year. 



FEAR NOT— I GO BEFORE 

CHILD of My love, fear not the unknown morrow, 
Dread not the new demand life makes of thee; 

Thy ignorance doth hold no cause for sorrow 
Since what thou knowest not is known to Me. 

Thou canst not see today the hidden meaning 
Of My command, but thou the light shalt gain ; 

Walk on in faith, upon my promise leaning, 
And as thou goest all shall be made plain. 

One step thou seest — then go forward boldly, 
One step is far enough for faith to see ; 

Take that, and thy next duty shall be told thee, 
For step by step thy Lord is leading thee. 

Stand not in fear for thy adversaries counting, 

Dare every peril, save to disobey ; 
Thou shalt march on, all obstacles surmounting, 

For I, the Strong, will open up the way. 

Wherefore go gladly to the task assigned thee, 
Having My promise, needing nothing more 

Than just to know, where'er the future find thee, 
In all thy journeying I go before. 

— Selected. 



AS JESUS KNEW IT 

If you feel that you are disillusioned as to the 
possibilities of human nature and think that the 
idealism of Christianity is "bunk," I say to you in 
all earnestness that you do not begin to know 
human nature as Jesus Christ knew it. And yet, 
though He understood all the weaknesses and sins 
and follies of human nature as no one before or 
since has known them, He nevertheless believed 
in the possibility of redeeming that self-same hu- 
man nature .... There is no pose so cheap as 
cynicism. I say to the one who assumes it, be 
sure your pose is not a smoke-screen because you 
are afraid of the demands that Christ will make 
on your life. 

REV. E. H. ECKEL, JR. 



Nine-tenths of the Japanese who have been at- 
tracted to the Christian religion, says the Rev. 
Mr. Kettlewell, senior priest in the diocese of 
Kobe, have probably been influenced by the lives 
of Japanese Christians and have tried to find the 
secret that means so much to them. 



One of the largest dry goods stores in Ottawa, 
Kansas, has been using its windows over the week- 
end to display the work of the various local 
Churches. Grace Church, when its turn came, 
had a fine display, including historical pictures of 
the early Church in this country, and of General 
Convention, Bibles and Prayer Books, Kansas 
Bishops, diocesan institutions, and many present- 
day aspects of Church life. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



A SUGGESTION FOR USE OF OLD PRAYER 
BOOKS AS A HELP IN RURAL WORK 



Since it is not feasible for churches or missions 
to continue using the Old Prayer Books any longer 
I want to suggest to the Auxiliaries in our Diocese 
to wrap each book, in good condition, attractively 
and enclose a card with the books to read some- 
what as follows : 

This book contains the devotional treasure of 

the ages. It is left by members of 

Church, who hope that you may find 

it interesting and helpful and we invite you, as 
occasion permits, to attend that Church and join 
in the worship of God according to the Book of 
Common Prayer. The hours of service are as fol- 
lows: ... 

The suggestion is that these Books, so wrapped, 
with this card enclosed, be left in the rural boxes 
along the various routes leading out from our 
Parish Churches and Missions. One has heard 
so often of the Missionary work done by a Prayer 
Book that this suggestion seems worthy of serious 
consideration. 

MRS. W. S. CARAWAN, 
Chairman of Rural Work for Auxiliaries 



Offerings for the Thompson Episcopal Home from 
the Parishes. Missions and Church Schools 
of the Diocese of East Carolina for 
1929 Quota. 



Holy Cross, Aurora 

Holy Cross Church School, Aurora 

Holy Innocents', Avoca 

St. James', Ayden 

St. James' Church School, Ayden 

St. Paul's, Beaufort 

St. Paul's Church School, Beaufort 
St. James', Belhaven 
Trinity, Chocowinity 

St. Paul's, Clinton '. 

St. Andrew's, Columbia ... 

St. David's Creswell 

St. John-Evangelist, Edenton 

St. Paul's, Edenton 350.00 

Christ Church, Elizabeth City 231.51 

Christ Church School, Elizabeth City 18.46 

St. Gabriel's, Faison 3.73 

St. John's, Fayetteville 145.91 



12.52 
28.29 
30.00 

8.00 
20.00 
27.46 
11.16 
26.02 

4.91 
15.05 

6.00 
19.40 

2.00 



St. John's Church School, Fayetteville, 
Good Shepherd, Tolar-Hart .. 
St. Mary's, Gatesville .. 

St. Stephen's, Goldsboro 

St. Paul's, Greenville 

St. Paul's Church School, Greenville 

St. Martin's, Hamilton 



18.41 
6.24 
22.41 
56.00 
25.00 
33.04 
10.00 

Holy Trinity, Hertford 120.02 

Christ Church, Hope Mills 

St. Thomas', Jasper __ 

Zion, Jessama 

Zion Church School, Jessama 



6.00 

5.55 

9.90 

14.93 



St. Mary's, Kinston 

St. George's, Lake Landing 

Trinity, Lumberton - 

Trinity Church School, Lumberton .. 

St. Andrew's, Morehead City .. 

St. Barnabas', Murfreesboro 

Christ Church, New Bern 

Mission, Pollocksville ., 

Grace Church, Plymouth 

St. Stephen's, Red Springs 

St. Luke's, Roper 

St. Mark's, Roxobel 

Holy Innocents', Seven Springs 

Holy Innocents' Ch. School, Seven Springs ... 

St. Barnabas', Snow Hill 

St. Philip's, Southport 

St. Philips Church School, Southport 

Grace Church, Trenton 

Grace Church School, Trenton 

St. Paul's, Vanceboro 

St. Peter's, Washington 

Advent, Williamston 

Good Shepherd, Wilmington 

St. James', Wilmington 

St. John's. Wilmington 

St. Paul's, Wilmington 

St. Thomas', Windsor 

St. Luke's Church School, Winterville .. 

Service League, St. Luke's Ch. School, Winterville 

Grace Church, Woodville 

St. Matthew's, Yeatesville 

Rev. G. H. Madara - 



147.05 

31.25 
1.55 

16.00 
8.06 
5.30 

50.27 
9.05 
7.60 
7.00 

13.15 
4.28 

11.15 

21.40 

37.50 
7.10 

16.27 
8.36 
1.90 

21.10 

164.48 

4.15 

17.51 
672.70 
125.07 

55.06 

21.50 
4.75 
4.00 

25.54 

3.00 

.10 



Total |2,8U.76 

Remittance to Rev. W. H. Wheeler, Supt. _. ....$2,811.76 



GOOD SHEPHERD, WILMINGTON 



THE Parish of the Church of the Good Shep- 
herd, under the wise and splendid leader- 
ship of its beloved Rector, Reverend John Benners 
Gibble, has had a busy and successful Fall and 
Winter program. 

Members of the Parish took their part in mak- 
ing the city wide Religious Survey. 

The Chapter of the Brotherhood of Saint An- 
drew, which was organized by Mr. Leon C. Palmer, 
in the Fall, meets regularly twice a month, and 
is working along the lines of the Brotherhood. 

Both the Good Shepherd and the Ascension 
Branches of the Woman's Auxiliary, which meet 
every Monday evening and Thursday afternoon, 
respectively, have been having splendid meetings, 
just before Thanksgiving the former branch gave 
an entertainment and raised $17.05 towards their 
apportionment. 

The Young People's Service League, mapped 
out a program in the Fall, which has proven very 
satisfactory. It has increased both interest and 
attendance. They meet every Tuesday evening. 
The first Tuesday is a business meeting, with a 
program presented by the League members — the 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



second Tuesday they go somewhere to give pleas- 
ure to others, they have already visited a family 
where the mother and daughter are both invalids. 
The County Home, The Red Cross Sanitorium and 
the Catherine Kennedy Home, when they go for 
these meetings, they carry fruit and candy, the 
meetings consist of a short service and a musical 
program. The 3rd. Tuesday they have an outside 
program, that is, someone is invited to come and 
speak to the League. The fourth Tuesday is a soc- 
ial meeting, and when there is a fifth Tuesday it 
is a missionary meeting. They are busy now, work- 
ing on a play, which they expect to give at an early 
date. 

The Church School Service Program meets each 
Monday afternoon, working in the Five Fields of 
Service. In the Parish they help in various ways, 
carrying in wood, taking down the Christmas 
decorations and getting the Parish Hall ready for 
entertainments. Members of both the Church 
School Service Program and Young People's Ser- 
vice League gave a beautiful pageant at the Christ- 
mas Tree and Festival December 27th. at which 
time the Church School presented their Advent 
Offering of $69.65. Among the activities for the 
community the C. S. S. P. carried a little decorated 
Christmas tree and some toys to a little colored 
girl at the Red Cross Sanitorium, and sang 
Christmas Carols to the patients. In their work 
for the Nation they sent a splendid box to the 
Chinese boys and girls of True Sunshine Mission, 
San Francisco, California, valued at $27.66. A 
number of the dolls sent were dressed by the girls. 
The C. S. S. P. also enjoy a social once a month. 

In the fall an Altar Guild of eight young girls, 
from the Y. P. S. L. was organized, they have 
been doing splendid work, they decorated the 
Church at Christmas. Since organizing they have 
had two candy sales and are planning for another, 
they are raising money to give a new Altar Ser- 
vice Book. The New Chancel Prayer Book will be 
given by the Church School Service Program and 
the one for the Litany Desk by one of the Church 
School Classes. 

The new revised Prayer Books for the Church 
have been given as memorials by the members of 
the Parish. The dedication of the same will be 
held at the eleven o'clock celebration of the Holy 
Communion the first Sunday in February. 

The annual service of the Feast of Lights was 
held on Epiphany Eve. A very beautiful, worship- 
ful and teachable service in which the three wise 
men in oriental costume, presented their gifts, as 
they sang the carol "We Three Kings of Orient 
Are". First Gaspare! offering his gift of gold, 
symbolic of royalty, worshipped Christ as King. 
Second, Melchoir bringing sweet frankincense, 



symbolic of worship, recognized Christ as God. 
Third, Balthazer presenting his gift of myrrh, 
symbolic of suffering and death foretold the sacri- 
fice on Calvary. 

Both impressive and full of meaning was the 
close of the service, when the Wise Men after re- 
ceiving their light from the one light burning on 
the Altar, which represented Christ the Light of 
the World, spread their lights throughout the dark- 
ened Church by lighting the taper of those in the 
end of the pews and they in turn lighting those 
next to them and so on until finally the whole 
church was ablaze with the burning tapers, sig- 
nifying how the personal touch of one life filled 
with "The Light" can spread until the whole world 
is made bright and beautiful in the name of Him 
who said "Let your light so shine before men that 
they may see your good works and glorify your 
Father which is in Heaven". 

As helpful as the symbolic service, was the ser- 
mon of the Rector which taught with forcefulness 
the meaning of the visit of the Wise Men and their 
gifts as applied to our lives in this year of our 
Lord. 1930. 



ST. MARY'S, KINSTON 



BISHOP DARST will come to St. Mary's on 
March 23, for the purpose of confirmation 
and to dedicate the three new memorial windows 
recently put in the church. One is in memory of 
Judge Rountree's son. 

The memorial given by three sons of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Harvey will be dedicated at the same 
time in loving memory of their mother and father. 

The third window will be dedicated in memory 
of Mr. Haskett, who was one of the most faithful 
members that has ever belonged to St. Mary's 
Church. Mr. Haskett and Mr. S. H. Abbott were 
for many years the leaders of St. Mary's. 

This occasion will be a most important occasion 
in St. Mary's Church to all those who knew and 
loved these people who have gone and especially 
to those loved ones who cherish their memory. 

We have recently had a mission in St. Mary's 
and also at Christ Church Mission, held by Captain 
Turner, of the Church Army. Captain Turner is 
a most earnest missioner and deserves the cooper- 
ation of all Episcopalians. 

Any boy at the age of 22 years who is willing to 
go out to do this fine work that he is endeavoring 
earnestly and religiously to do, giving up his peo- 
ple and devoting his whole life, only receiving for 
his services his clothes and board and about $5 
per week deserves to be bowed to and honored 
wherever he goes. I am sorry for any one who 
is so unfortunate as not to be able to enter into 



THE MISSION HERALD 



11 



these simple, humble services held by just an or- 
dinary layman of the Episcopal Church. 

We Episcopalians need to get more, and I hope 
the time is not far off when we will all get more 
of the Evangelistic Spirit, which is urged by our 
Bishop and the leading people of our Church. 
LEON H. SUGG. 



THE BROTHERHOOD, ELIZABETH CITY 



THE Brotherhood of St. Andrew of Elizabeth 
City during January gave itself just one 
major job — to work for the Men's Bible Class. 
By careful study of the problem and consistent 
work the attendance has more than doubled. 

Men who have never attended a Bible Class are 
now attending and are themselves inviting others 
to attend. Mr. W. P. Skinner, our President, is 
keeping us at work, and we enjoy it. 



ST. JOHN'S PAROCHIAL SCHOOL, 
EDENTON, N. C. 



AVERY notable feature has been inaugurated 
this term in the School, in the form of a 
little Community Chest. When the appeal was 
made known for the children to bring their pen- 
nies and contributions in kind to distribute among 
those less fortunate in our vicinity, they respond- 
ed quite liberally, so much so that at Christmas 
time we were enabled to distribute 12 baskets of 
provisions around to the needy, and also on 
Thanksgiving similar request brought forth sev- 
eral baskets. 

Since then, the Civic Organizations of the town 
were asking for help, our pupils again responded 
generously with their pennies making a donation, 
thus sacrificing confectionaries and the like. We 
are trying to instill in their little hearts the words 
of the Master, "How He said. It is more blessed to 
give than to receive". 



TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR THE NEW YEAR 



1. Thou shalt not take any grudges into the new 
year. 

2. Thou shalt forget thy defeats and trustfully 
walk into the future with God. 

3. Thou shalt not let the trivial things make thee 

neglect thy soul. 

4. Thou shalt not yield to evil. 

•5. Thou shalt not force God into a minor place in 
thy life. 

6. Thou shalt give generously of thy substance 
to God's cause. 

7. Thou shalt use thy influence to upbuild God's 
kingdom. 



8. Thou shalt help thy neighbor into fellowship 
with Christ. 

9. Thou shalt give Christ the pre-eminence in all 
things. 

10. Thou shalt live the new year in the light of 
eternity. 

P. L. Frick, in N. Y. Advocate. 



The Rev. Yui Wen-ch'in, recently retired be- 
cause of advancing age, has been a priest in the 
diocese of Hankow for thirty-nine years. 



A PRAYER FOR THE FAMILY 



(Robert Louis Stevenson) 
Lord behold our family here assembled.' 
We thank thee for the place in which we 
dwell; for the love that unites us; for the 
peace accorded us this day ; for the hope with 
which we expect the morrow ; for the health, 
the work, the food and the bright skies that 
make our lives delightful; for our friends in 
all parts of the earth. Purge out of every 
heart the lurking grudge. Give us grace and 
strength to forbear and to persevere. Of- 
fenders, give us the grace to accept and for- 
give offenders. Forgetful ourselves, help us 
to bear cheerfully the forgetfulness of others. 
Give us courage and faith and the quiet mind. 
Spare us to our friends, soften us to our en- 
emies. Bless us, if it may be, give us 
strength to encounter that which is to come, 
that we may be brave in peril, constant in 
tribulation, temperate in wrath and in all 
changes of fortune, down to the gates of 
death, loyal and loving one another. As the 
clay to the potter, as the wind mill to the 
wind, as children of their sire we beseech of 
thee this help and mercy for Christ's sake. 



HOW DO YOU TAKE REPROOF? 



Mrs. Iva F. Cady 

Probably none of us enjoy being reproved. We are 
naturally proud, and it is humiliating to know that others 
consider us faulty or in error, even though we ourselves 
may be conscious of such shortcomings. In many in- 
stances we feel the reproof, and have not yet learned 
to accept it meekly and thank the reprover, it might help 
us to read the book of Proverbs, and note the counsel 
there on this subject: 

"He that hateth reproof shall die," says the wise man, 
while "he that regardeth reproof is prudent and shall 
be honored." He "that heareth the reproof of life 
abideth among the wise" and "getteth understanding." 
"A wise son heareth his father's instruction: but a scorn- 
er heareth not rebuke." 

Are wc among those who hate reproof? Do we have 



12 THE MISSION HERALD 

such an exalted opinion of ourselves that we cannot bear Angel Katie Mann Gibbs 

to hear the suggestion that we have erred? If any one Shepherds —Edna Ward Taylor, Julia Parkin, 
ventures to reprove us, do we become angry, accuse him Katherine McAllister. 

of faultfinding, and endeavor to justify ourselves: It 

so, let us change, and take God at His word, accepting Wlse Men— Betty Uzzell, Kate Conner Murray, 
His assurance that reproof is for our good. If we are Matilda Klein. 

truly wise, we shall profit by it; for "reproof entereth Mary Gertrude House 

more into a wise man than a hundred stripes into a fool." Joseph Ada Jones 

Prov. 17:10. Other people often see faults in us to Scripture, St. Luke 2 ..____ Mr. Lillycrop- 

which we ourselves are blind. It is for our good to be ,-> •,. » OI , r^-jo- n ■ /-< _x 

4. u ^ ix. * 14. 4.1. x x ft. Reading of Club Gift Cassie Carty 

told of these faults, so that we may correct them. 

Holy Night Trevor Porter 

"Oh wad some power the giftie gie us After the singing Qf Christmas Carolg each 

To see oursel s as ithers see us . . . .. . . ... . . , , . „„ . . 

It wad frae monie blunder free us, £ irl received a tiny gift which was taken off the 

An' foolish notions." Christmas Tree by Mr. Lillycrop. 
T , ■ .„ , , ., . Refreshments consisting of hot chocolate, or- 

If we are wise, we will learn while voung to receive re- ° ' 

proof, even if it comes very frequently. We all need it. an £ e cake an( J stuffed dates were served.. 

Let us remember that "the way of a fool is right in his The meeting closed with wishes for a Merry 

own eyes: but he that hearkeneth unto counsel is wise." Christmas to all 

And we are to be not only patient when reprove for On Sunday, December 15, Rev. Elwood Haines, 

our faults, but when we receive undeserved reproof. For Executive Secretary of North Carolina spoke to 

what glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, n, ri~n„„ pi x n nr • Tr , • 

v. ii xi -x x- x, o id x ■* i. i ,i J the College Class on the Missionarv Vocation, 

ye shall take it patiently? But if, when ye do well, and ,. TT . . . _ ., 

suffer for it, ye take it patiently, this is acceptable with JJr* Haines is a former Missionary to Liberia and 

God." In either case, we are to take reproof in a right tne author of two volumes of poems. The girls 

spirit. Christ left us an example in this very thing, that were very much interested in having some one 

we should follow His steps. who had been in the foreign field speak to them 

in a practical way concerning the life of a mis- 

a ,> sionary. 

J W ®ffB£(llIIi 9 § AlUXiliairy ? Tne man >" fiends of Miriam Canady will.be 

J Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. ? £ Iad to know that she has returned to the College 

i Publicity Chairman f to take U P her sch ° o1 work a & ain - Miriam was 

^~X*XK«XKKK~X^«X~X«X«X"X~X«X«X«X^ President of the Student Club last year and has 

ST. THOMAS, WINDSOR been greatly missed. 

We will be glad to know the names of any new 

THE Woman's Auxiliary of St. Thomas Church, students who have entered college this term. 

Windsor, has been joined by the Baptist and 

Methodist Woman's Missionary Societies, in a ADVANCE WORK 

program of Christian Social Service. Two meet- 

ings have already been held and the third will be \\/ E have been asked b ^ tne National Council 
some time in February. No separate organiza- V> to do a big thing educationally and prac- 

tion has been— or will be— formed. The women tically, to help in the raising a million and a 

get together, talk over problems, learn of new naIf dollars for the Advance Work beginning this 

cases for help and appoint a committee to act until y ear > 193 °- In order that we may be quite clear 

the next meeting. The meetings are held in the about [t > T am soing to begin the story rather far 

different churches with the respective Social Ser- back - As .v° u know > the General Church Program 

vice Chairman in charge consists of two parts ; one the maintenance of the 

A. J. MACKIE work already being done, known as the Budget, 

and the other, the new work which should be un- 

STUDENT WORK AT EAST CAROLINA dertaken, the Advance Work. We cannot divide 

TFACHFR'S COT T FCF them in interest and importance. The first part of 

the program is carried out fairly well — only fairly 

IT'S a Happy New Year the Students at East weil because even the maintenance of our existing 

Carolina Teacher's College are wishing you ! work is cut down to bare necessities. The greater 

The last meeting of the Student Club before the tragedy is in the other part of the Program— the 

holidays was held Friday afternoon, December Advance Work, which hasn't advanced. There are 

13th at the rectory. aproximately 75 churches, 9 hospitals, 24 schools, 

The program consisted of a beautiful pageant which should be helped now. 
of the Christmas story enacted by the following When we met in the Triennial in Washington, 

girls — a year ago last October, we voted to do a little of 



THE MISSION HERALD 



13 



this Advance Work, to build a church in Santo 
Domingo City, a church in Panama, a dormitory 
in Christ School, Arden, N. C, and the water sup- 
ply at Ethete, Wyoming. The money, §50,000 need- 
ed for these objects has been given and the under- 
taking completed. 

The National Council has asked the Auxiliary 
to "cooperate in every way with the National 
Council in the promotion of the Advance Work 
Program", instead of undertaking another sepa- 
rate Corporate Gift in 1930. 

That is the history of our plan and it brings us 
up to the present. Now for the future. First of all 
we want to make the need to go forward in the 
different mission fields of the Church, an oppor- 
tunity for the development of two things, an 
entering into God's plan for His Church's growth, 
and an act of fellowship with others in different 
parts of the world. 

The Committee on the Corporate Gift, with Mrs. 
Burkham as Chairman, will continue to lead us in 
our efforts. 

The Field department is asking your Bishop for 
an appointment to talk over with him, the objects 
which will be undertaken by your Diocese. We 
hope that the Auxiliary will make itself respon- 
sible in seeing that information about these ob- 
jects is spread throughout the diocese. 

We have given easily and happily to four ob- 
jects. We will give as happily and in spite of the 
larger totals, perhaps as easily to the objects which 
the dioceses undertake, so that really the difference 
will be, that in 1929 the Auxiliary alone gave to 
four enterprises, in 1930 and 1931 it, and through 
its efforts, the women of the Church will give their 
share to 170 enterprises, or shall we put it, to 170 
opportunities to become greater friends with peo- 
ple in our own country and in other places. 

May 1930 be a year full of happiness for us all 
and especially for those friends of ours in 170 
places. 

Faithfully yours, 

GRACE LINDLEY, 

Executive Secretary. 



Report of the meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary 
of the Fourth Province, at Columbia, S. C, will 
be printed in the next issue. 



REPORT OF BOARD MEETING 



I HAVE just returned from New York where I 
attended a meeting of the Executive Board held 
at Church Missions House, Dec. 6th to 9th with 
Sunday intervening. Three days of constant con- 
sideration of the subjects brought to our atten- 
tion. 



Mrs. Allen McGregor our new chairman opened 
the meeting with the message of the Advent 
season, that of making a new start. That as at 
this season each year brings the Christian year 
all over again, so it is necessary in nearly every- 
thing we undertake that "new starts" be made 
to reach successful goals. 

The attendance was smaller than usual on ac- 
count of illness or disability in several families. 
Those of you that know Miss Louisa Davis are 
distressed to hear that she fell on the ice last 
month and is suffering with a broken hip. The 
Board sent her a letter and a book to read. 

The reports of the secretaries are always in- 
teresting, and this time they showed much activ- 
ity. Many had been in the field visiting, learning 
different situations and responding to urgent re- 
quests for help. Miss Beardsley of the Field Com- 
mittee asked for an additional field worker which 
will be granted if the right person is available. 

Probably the most important subject was that 
of the big Advance program of the Church, or the 
larger Corporate Gift of the women, and of which 
we have heard was held up last spring on account 
of the drive for St. Luke's Hospital, Tokyo. Officers 
of the council came to one of our meetings and 
the two subjects were talked over thoroughly. 
The final decision was that if after the Council 
met it should be thought best for the extra Cor- 
porate Gift of $50,000 voted on at our Oct. meeting 
to be merged into the larger gift of the whole 
Church, that we should do so. Many thought that 
our going ahead with the Corporate Gift of the 
women would add more to the whole, others seem- 
ed to think it would hinder the corporate work of 
all men, women and children together, and as the 
women are to stand ready to help with the whole 
program of the Church, so a separate undertak- 
ing by them will be drawn if the Council deems it 
best. As final plans are made you will be informed. 
Mrs. Burkham. as chairman of the women, hopes 
to use the same committees that worked for the 
woman's Corporate Gift. An intensive educational 
program is to be arranged for 1930, although one 
or two dioceses have asked for definate projects 
for gifts as well as an educational program. So 
be sure to "read the Church papers". 

Mrs. Wetnlore from Christ School, Arden, N. 
C. came in to thank the women of the Church in 
the name of the School for the $10,000 given by 
the Corporate Gift this year for the very much 
needed dormitory. 

Bishop Colmore had sent an appeal to New 
York for help to finish St. Catherine's training 
school at Porto Rico. He had all but about $2,500 
so from some accumalated interest in the Corpo- 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



rate Gift, $2,000 was voted for him. And that 
leads me to speak of the discussion on how neces- 
sary it is for the projects we undertake to be 
really finished or their purpose and usefulness is 
not complete. Miss Mathews and her mother had 
been on a trip through North Carolina and she 
spoke of the unfinished condition of some of the 
buildings at St. Augustines, Raleigh, especially 
the memorial to Mr. Thomas. She urged that we 
emphasize this and not attempt, for instance a 
thirty thousand dollar building with only twenty 
thousand. 

There is much of interest that I might dwell 
upon but it would make this letter entirely too long 
and you will read of other items in the Spirit of 
Missions. 

My closing thought is that given by our new 
Presiding Bishop. Bishop Anderson came to our 
meeting on the last day, He gave a stirring mes- 
sage of what the Auxiliary had stood for, what it 
had accomplished through prayer and gifts and 
work and begged us to hold fast to those ideals 
upon which it was founded, to always see the mis- 
sion of the Church, and try to make progress more 
progressive. Isn't that a wonderful thought with 
which to make "our new start" with the Advent 
season, to try to make "progress more progres- 
sive". 

MRS. J. R. WHEELER, 
Representative. 



MRS. CAIN'S LETTER 



IN accepting the presidency of the Auxiliary in 
the Fourth Province I am deeply grateful for 
your confidence in me ; life can offer me no higher 
honor than this which brings me the opportunity 
of serving with so fine a group of women in the 
work of my Church for the extension of Christ's 
Kingdom. 

This year we begin our work in the Province 
under a new plan ; a plan which will, I believe, 
tend to increase fellowship, breadth of vision and 
achievement and through which we shall all gain 
inspiration and encouragement. In thinking over 
the recent meeting it has seemed to me that it 
would be well to sum up, for your attention, a few 
of the suggestions which were made. 

First in my thought, because the need is immed- 
iate, is the Emerald Hodgson Memorial Fund; 
you will remember that by our vote this fund is 
to be closed on December 30th and that, also by 
our vote it is to be a memorial in this Province to 
our dear Bishop Murray. Surely the obligation is 
upon us to make the gift worthy of such a desig- 
nation. 

Next I would remind you of our promise to lay 



before the Diocesan Branches a plea for a gift 
toward the $500.00 fund which is to supplement 
the S500.00 already given from the treasury to 
aid in the financing of the Department of Relig- 
ious Education in the Province. 

And then the reports from the two committees 
headed by Mrs. Henry Davis and Mrs. S. P. 
Adams, of which you were given copies. It was a 
matter of sincere regret that there was not time 
for a discussion of these reports; both commit- 
tees did splendid work in gathering up the suggest- 
ions offered and presenting them to us in practical 
form and we are greatly indebted to them for the 
fine way in which they put through this diffi- 
cult task. So many of the parish presidents are 
anxious for concrete plans that I am sure you 
need no urging to study these reports and adapt 
the suggestion to the use of your own Branches. 
I have a few copies left on hand which I will be 
glad to supply to those requesting them. 

Another fine feature slighted for lack of time 
was the Symposium on News of the Province ; you 
will be glad to know that these brief reports from 
the Diocesan presidents will be included in the 
Yearbook. Read them over carefully for they out- 
line plans which have been successfully carried 
out somewhere in the Province. 

Finally, let me ask that each one of you keep 
the Provincial work in mind; forward to me any 
suggestions which may occur to you and offer your 
criticism of what has been done or planned for the 
future; I shall need every bit of help which you 
can give. And I shall be more than glad to give to 
each one of you whatever service it may be pos- 
sible for me to render. "We are all missionaries — 
the Sent Out Ones of the King" ; let us bind our- 
selves together in a real and holy fellowship with 
Him and with each other, ready to serve at home 
or abroad, in large ways or small, with equal de- 
votion and with a deep consciousness of the 
"Emanuel"' — God with us. 

May this blessed Christmas Season bring to 
each one of us a new and clearer vision of our 
Lord, of His truth, of His strength and of his love 
so that we may go forth in the New Year to serve 
Him anew ever more and more perfectly unto our 
life's end. 

ISABELLE LINDSAY CAIN, 
President 



CHURCH PERIODICAL CLUB 

VI 7 HAT better New Year resolution could we 
W make than to be more diligent in the Church 
work asked of us? There are so many ways in 
which each of us could help. All of us cannot go 
into the field as Missionaries, all of us have not the 
time for filling offices in the Church organizations. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



15 



There are many of us who for various reasons 
cannot attend meetings, or even religious services, 
but there are still many ways left in which *ve can 
help the great work of bringing the World to 
Christ, and Christ to the World. 

The Church Periodical Club offers a way in 
which any one may do her bit. The Church Peri- 
odical Club is, as most of us know, a society thru 
which magazines, books, cards and pictures are 
sent out all over the world to those who need them. 
The work is handled through a Secretary in every 
Parish, and a director in every Diocese, and the 
Headquarters of the Society in New York City. 
There is a place for new magazines, if you can 
afford to give the subscriptions; there is a reader 
for every magazine to which you yourself sub- 
scribe, when you have finished reading it, and 
there is a great need for books, pictures, contri- 
butions of money in schools and libraries and 



offices of missionaries, all over the world. 

At present, the Diocese of East Carolina has 
only eight active Secretaries in the parishes, and 
sixty four periodicals reported as being subscribed 
or forwarded to other readers by our members. 
We must have a far better report than that by 
the end of this New Year. Let us all help. If there 
is not a Secretary in your Parish, please bring the 
subject up at your next meeting. If you feel in- 
clined to give a magazine, or pass on one of your 
own, please notify that Secretary, or, pending her 
appointment, send me a card. I will be glad to 
furnish full details. 

With best wishes for great success in all of our 
work this year, 1 am, 

Sincerely, 
MRS. J. P. WATTERS, Director, 
Church Periodical Club 
Edenton, N. C. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Statement of Amounts Paid on 1 9 2 9 Apportionments to February 3, 1930. 



Location 

Edenton, St 

Woodville, G 
Burgaw, St 
Winterville. 



Parish 

Paul's 
race Churc 

Mary's 
St. Luke's 



First 

Apportionment 

Fully Paid 

Fully Paid 
.Fully Paid 
Fully Paid 



Paid 
Pari 



Paid bv 
:h. School 



<c 1 4 -wn no 



Fourth 

Chocowinity, Trinity ... Fully Paid 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's Fully Paid 

Hope Mills. Christ Church _. Fully Paid 

Jessama, Zion _ Fully Paid 

Lake Landing. St. George's Fully Paid 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's Fully Paid 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' Fully Paid 

Vanceboro. St. PauTs Fnllv Pair! 



CORRECTION :— In financial statement, page 15, 
Fayetteville, St. John's, and Goldsboro, St. 
Stephen's, are reversed in second and third 
columns and should read as follows : 



Location Parish 

Fayetteville, St. John's 
Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 



Third 

Ayden, St. James' Fully Paid 

Beaufort, St. Paul's Fully Paid 

Bonnerton, St. John's Fully Paid 

Clinton, St. Paul's _ Fully Paid 

Roper, St. Luke's "... Fully Paid 

Williamston. Advent Fully Paid 

Columbia, St. Andrew's Fully Paid 

Roxobel, St. Mark's Fully Paid 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' . Fully Paid 

Whiteville. Grace Church , Fully Paid 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' Fully Paid 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's Fully Paid 

Hamilton. St. Martin's Fully Paid 

Belhaven, St. James' $ 500.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 200.00 

Southport. St. Philip's ..: 250.00 

Winton, St. John's. 200.00 

Farmville. Emmanuel 530.00 

Warsaw, Calvary . 80.00 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's _ 100.00 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 60.00 



188.30 

171.83 

110.00 

75.00 



10.00 
10.50 



Paid by Paid by 
Apportionment Parish Ch - Schonl 

4,300.00 2,900.00 

1,500.00 941.76 55.89 

Pikeville, St. George's Fully Paid 

Roper, St. Ann's Fully Paid 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd Fully Paid 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission Fully Paid 

Wrightsville. St. Augustine's .Fully Paid 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' _ % 100.00 

Aurora. Holy Cross 500.00 

Bath, St. Thomas' 100.00 

Grifton, St. John's 250.00 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 100.00 

Edward, Redeemer 25.00 

North West. All Souls' 50.00 

Sladesville. St. John's 30.00 

Sunbury, St. Peter's . . 75.00 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 100.00 

Greenville. St. Andrew's .. 50.00 

$ 106.63 Jasper. St. Thomas' 50.00 

20.00 Kinston, Christ Church 75.00 

40.00 Oriental, St. Thomas' 10.00 

Pollocksville Mission 48.00 

-— Robersonville Mission _. 25.00 

- Campbellton, St. Philip's 100. 00 

50.00 Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's .... 66. SO 
- Williamston. St. Ignatius' _ 20.00 



83.50 % 

140.00 50.00 

56.25 8.90 

14.50 

15.00 30.70 

45.00 6.20 

1.00 __ 
21.00 

35.85 

20.00 30.00 

33.16 

58.35 
5.50 
11.50 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



rate Gift, $2,000 was voted for him. And that 
leads me to speak of the discussion on how neces- 
sary it is for the projects we undertake to be 
really finished or their purpose and usefulness is 
not complete. Miss Mathews and her mother had 
been on a trip through North Carolina and she 
spoke of the unfinished condition of some of the 
buildings at St. Augustines, Raleigh, especially 
the memorial to Mr. Thomas. She urged that we 
emphasize this and not attempt, for instance a 
thirty thousand dollar building with only twenty 
thousand. 

There is much of interest that I might dwell 
upon but it would make this letter entirely too long 
and you will read of other items in the Spirit of 
Missions. 

My closing thought is that given by our new 
Presiding Bishop. Bishop Anderson came to our 
meeting on the last day, He gave a stirring mes- 
sage of what the Auxiliary had stood for, what it 
had accomplished through prayer and gifts and 
work and begged us to hold fast to those ideals 
upon which it was founded, to always see the mis- 
sion of the Church, and try to make progress more 
progressive. Isn't that a wonderful thought with 
which to make "our new start" with the Advent 
season, to try to make "progress more progres- 
sive". 

MRS. J. R. WHEELER, 




This year we begin our worK in tne rrovniee 
under a new plan; a plan which will, I believe, 
tend to increase fellowship, breadth of vision and 
achievement and through which we shall all gain 
inspiration and encouragement. In thinking over 
the recent meeting it has seemed to me that it 
would be well to sum up, for your attention, a few 
of the suggestions which were made. 

First in my thought, because the need is immed- 
iate, is the Emerald Hodgson Memorial Fund; 
you will remember that by our vote this fund is 
to be closed on December 30th and that, also by 
our vote it is to be a memorial in this Province to 
our dear Bishop Murray. Surely the obligation is 
upon us to make the gift worthy of such a desig- 
nation. 

Next I would remind you of our promise to lay 



before the Diocesan Branches a plea for a gift 
toward the $500.00 fund which is to supplement 
the S500.00 already given from the treasury to 
aid in the financing of the Department of Relig- 
ious Education in the Province. 

And then the reports from the two committees 
headed by Mrs. Henry Davis and Mrs. S. P. 
Adams, of which you were given copies. It was a 
matter of sincere regret that there was not time 
for a discussion of these reports; both commit- 
tees did splendid work in gathering up the suggest- 
ions offered and presenting them to us in practical 
form and we are greatly indebted to them for the 
fine way in which they put through this diffi- 
cult task. So many of the parish presidents are 
anxious for concrete plans that I am sure you 
need no urging to study these reports and adapt 
the suggestion to the use of your own Branches. 
I have a few copies left on hand which I will be 
glad to supply to those requesting them. 

Another fine feature slighted for lack of time 
was the Symposium on News of the Province ; you 
will be glad to know that these brief reports from 
the Diocesan presidents will be included in the 
Yearbook. Read them over carefully for they out- 
line plans which have been successfully carried 
out somewhere in the Province. 

Finally, let me ask that each one of you keep 
the Provincial work in mind; forward to me any 
onnn-ootmno \irVn»i mnv rwmr t.n vou and offer vour 



H/manuei 



-VjUU wiui uo. 



May this blessed Christmas Season bring to 
each one of us a new and clearer vision of our 
Lord, of His truth, of His strength and of his love 
so that we may go forth in the New Year to serve 
Him anew ever more and more perfectly unto our 
life's end. 

ISABELLE LINDSAY CAIN, 
President 



w 



CHURCH PERIODICAL CLUB 

7 HAT better New Year resolution could we 
make than to be more diligent in the Church 
work asked of us? There are so many ways in 
which each of us could help. All of us cannot go 
into the field as Missionaries, all of us have not the 
time for filling offices in the Church organizations. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



15 



There are many of us who for various reasons 
cannot attend meetings, or even religious services, 
but there are still many ways left in which vve can 
help the great work of bringing the World to 
Christ, and Christ to the World. 

The Church Periodical Club offers a way in 
which any one may do her bit. The Church Peri- 
odical Club is, as most of us know, a society thru 
which magazines, books, cards and pictures are 
sent out all over the world to those who need them. 
The work is handled through a Secretary in every 
Parish, and a director in every Diocese, and the 
Headquarters of the Society in New York City. 
There is a place for new magazines, if you can 
afford to give the subscriptions; there is a reader 
for every magazine to which you yourself sub- 
scribe, when you have finished reading it, and 
there is a great need for books, pictures, contri- 
butions of money in schools and libraries and 



offices of missionaries, all over the world. 

At present, the Diocese of East Carolina has 
only eight active Secretaries in the parishes, and 
sixty four periodicals reported as being subscribed 
or forwarded to other readers by our members. 
We must have a far better report than that by 
the end of this New Year. Let us all help. If there 
is not a Secretary in your Parish, please bring the 
subject up at your next meeting. If you feel in- 
clined to give a magazine, or pass on one of your 
own, please notify that Secretary, or, pending her 
appointment, send me a card. I will be glad to 
furnish full details. 

With best wishes for great success in all of our 
work this year, 1 am, 

Sincerely, 
MRS. J. P. WATTERS, Director, 
Church Periodical Club 
Edenton, N. C. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Statement of Amounts Paid on 1 9 2. 9 Apportionments to February 3, 1930. 



Location 



l'arish 



First 

Paid by Paid by 
Apportionment Parish Ch. School 



Kdenton, St. Paul's Fully Paid 

Woodville, Grace Church Fully Paid 

Burgaw, St. Mary's Fully Paid 

Winterville. St. Luke's ._ Fully Paid 

Wilmington, St. James' ....$ 13,380.00 

Second 

Creswell, St. David's Fully Paid 

Plymouth, Grace Church ._ Fully Paid 

Wilmington, St. John's .Fully Paid 

Wilmington, St. Paul's Fully Paid 

Windsor. St. Thomas' . ... Fully Paid 

Elizabeth City. Christ Church $ 2,415.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 4,300.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's _.. 1,500.00 

Greenville. St. Paul's ,. 2,100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1,000.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 2.500.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 4,000.00 

Washington, St. Peter's _ 4,500.00 

Third 

Ayden, St. James' Fully Paid 

Beaufort, St. Paul's Fully Paid 

Bonnerton, St. John's _ Fully Paid 

Clinton, St. Paul's __._. Fully Paid 

Roper, St. Luke's .'...Fully Paid 

Williamston. Advent _ Fully Paid 

Columbia, St. Andrew's Fully Paid 

Roxobel, St. Mark's ... Fully Paid 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' Fully Paid 

Whiteville, Grace Church .., Fully Paid 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' Fully Paid 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's Fully Paid 

Hamilton, St. Martin's Fully Paid 

Belhaven. St. James' ... $ 500.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 200.00 

Southport. St. Philip's 250.00 

Winton, St. John's. 200.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 530.00 

Warsaw. Calvary _._ 80.00 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 100.00 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 60.00 



11,072.49 $ 690.71 



1.448.92 

941.76 

2,900.00 

701.21 

625.00 

1,015.00 

1,818.92 

2.813.43 



188.30 

171.83 

110.00 

75.00 



10.00 
10.50 



450.42 
55.89 

238.72 
125.00 
200.00 
249.87 
293.55 



106.63 
20.00 
■10.00 



Fourth 

Chocowinity. Trinity Fully Paid 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's .. Fully Paid 

Hope Mills, Christ Church ... Fully Paid 

Jessama, Zion Fully Paid 

Lake Landing, St. George's Fully Paid 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's Fully Paid 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' Fully Paid 

Vanceboro. St. Paul's Fully Paid 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd Fully Paid 

Wilmington. St. Mark's .. Fully Paid 

Belhaven, St. Mary's Fully Paid 

Edenton. St. John-Evangelist Fully Paid 

Elizabeth City. St. Philip's _ Fully Paid 

Fairfield. All Saints' Fully Paid 

Faison. St Gabriel's . .... Fully Paid 

Kinston. St. Augustine's Fully Paid 

Lumberton, Trinity .. Fully Paid 

Maxton, St Matthew's Fully Paid 

Trenton. Grace Church _ Fully Paid 

Washington, St. Paul's Fully Paid 

Wrightsville. St. Andrew's Fully Paid 

Aurora, St. Jude's Fully Paid 

Beaufort, St. Clement's ...Fully Paid 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' Fully Paid 

Pikeville, St. George's Fully Paid 

Roper, St. Ann's Fully Paid 

Tolar-Hart. Good Shepherd ._. Fully Paid 
Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission .... Fully Paid 
Wrightsville, St. Augustine's Fully Paid 

Atkinson. St. Thomas' $ 100.00 

Aurora. Holy Cross 500.00 

Bath, St. Thomas' 100.00 

Grifton, St. John's 250.00 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 100.00 

Edward, Redeemer 25.00 

North West, All Souls' 50.00 

Sladesville, St. John's 30.00 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 75.00 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 100.00 

Greenville. St. Andrew's 50.00 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 50.00 

Kinston, Christ Church 75.00 

Oriental. St. Thomas' 10.00 

Pollocksville Mission 48.00 

Robersonville Mission _ 25.00 

Campbellton, St. Philip's 100. 00 

Haddock's X Roads. St. Stephen's... 65. SO 

Wiltiamston. St. Ignatius' _... 30.00 



83.50 $ 

140.00 50.00 

56.25 8.90 

14.50 

15.00 30.70 

45.00 6.20 

1.00 

21.00 

35.85 

20.00 30.00 

33.16 ...... 

58.85 
5.50 
11.50 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



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Courses in Music, Art, Expression, Home Economics, and Business. 
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THE MISSION HERALD 



MARCH INDEX 



Page 

Secret of Our SucceSvS ... 3 

Meaning of Lent 4 

Bishop's Letter 5 

Diocese Acquires Camp Leach 6 

Social Service , 6 

Paragraph News . 7 

Editorials 8 

Church Army 8 

Bishop Darst at the University 8 

Good Shepherd, Tolar-Hart . 9 

St. James, Belhaven : 9 

Letter from Mission Herald 9 

St. John's, Wilmington 10 

St. Paul's, Edenton . 10 

Annual Report of Orphanage 10 

Addison Hosea 11 

Woman's Auxiliary: 

Appeal to Young Women 12 

To Recruiting Committee 12 

Rural Work .__ 13 

Program of Rural Work 13 

St. Barnabas, Snow Hill 13 

Church Periodical Club 13 

Letter from Miss Weatherly 14 

Extract of Letter from Miss Lindley 14 

Christmas Box Work 14 

Prayer for Russian Church 15 

Financial Statement 15 



IN PALESTINE 



Fifteen Moslems were baptized last year in 
Galilee by Bishop Maclnnes, of Jerusalem. "I 
think this marks an era," he writes, "because the 
news of it was known all over Palestine. They 
are all standing firm under very difficult circum- 
stances." 

An incident during the trouble in Palestine last 
fall concerned Dr. Joseph Klausner. He is the 
distinguished Jewish scholar who six or seven 
years ago wrote a "Life of Jesus" which has had 
the largest sale of any book in modern Hebrew 
literature. His house is in a suburb of Jerusalem, 
which was attacked by large numbers of fanatical 
Moslem Arabs. He was saved from massacre 
and his books and papers from being burned by 
the speedy sending of help from Jerusalem in the 
form of some visiting theological students from 
Wycliffe Hall, Oxford, who held off the attack for 
several hours until an armored car arrived. 

These two incidents in a way illustrate the 
peculiar mission and position of the Anglican 
Communion in Palestine, facing both Islam and 
Jewry and ministering to each. 



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The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, MARCH, 1930 



No. 



The Seoret of Out Suae^esg 



THE very interesting report of our Committee 
on the State of the Church to the Conven- 
tion of 1929 should be read by all the people of 
the Diocese. It shows the progress of the Diocese 
for a period of ten years. 

1. In receipts for the Bishop's salary; Thomp- 
son Orphanage; Lenten Mite Box offering; Birth- 
day Thank Offering; Stipends of Missionary 
Clergy and other workers ; Salaries and other Cur- 
rent and Special Parochial Expenses of our 
thirteen self-supporting Parishes. 

2. Buildings and Equipment. 
"Remarkable progress," says the report, "has 

been made and large sums of money have been 
spent in building and equip- 
ping Parish Houses and Rec- 
tories and enlarging, remod- 
eling, and beautifying our 
Church Buildings. Our peo- 
ple have given liberally to 
this work. In many places 
we are fitted and prepared 
for our work in a way un- 
dreamed of ten years ago — 
and the end is not yet. A 
comparison of what we had 
in 1928 and what we have in 
1929 eloquently sustains the 
caption of the pages of this 
report— "TEN YEARS OF PROGRESS." 

3. In the increase in the number of baptisms, 
confirmations, church school teachers, officers, 
and pupils. 

4. Church property and insurance. 

5. General Church Quota. "The Diocese paid 
in full its obligations to the General Church for 
1928 — a perfect record since the beginning of the 
Nation-Wide Campaign." 

At the Convention of this year, which will meet 
in St. Paul's Parish, Wilmington, in May, the Com- 
mittee can again report PROGRESS. It can say 
that in spite of the serious financial situation in 
the Diocese during 1929 the General Church Quota 
was paid in full and all but about $1,000 of our 
Diocesan obligations — a very remarkable, if not 
a perfect, record for the year. 

"How do you account for this progress?" we 
are often asked by the people of other Dioceses. 
"What is the secret?" Some of our own people 



PAROCHIAL REPORTS 



THE Diocesan Convention will 
meet May 14, 1930, in St. Paul's 
Church, Wilmington, N. C. 

All parochial reports should be 
sent AT ONCE to the Rev. W. R. Noe, 
Southern Bldg., Wilmington. 

In vacant parishes and missions 
the Wardens should send in this re- 
port. 



ask practically the same question. They want to 
know where so much money comes from, and why 
it is that periods of depression have very little 
effect on our work. This is doubtless the answer : 
A clergyman, who was in one of our vacant 
parishes for a Conference on the Church's Pro- 
gram, was asked to call on one of the members of 
the parish who was unable, on account of sickness, 
to attend the Conference at the Church. He was 
told that this person had only a small income — 
about $12.50 a week — and that she had been at 
considerable expense on account of her sickness. 
He was also told that it would be impossible for 
her to make a pledge, and that it would be well 
to talk of other things in 
that home. 

This was perfectly satis- 
factory to the clergyman. He 
agreed with them that the 
Church should do all it could 
for this member, and that it 
would be a mistake to ask 
her for a pledge. He de- 
cided, if possible, to forget 
the needs of the Church on 
this visit and to talk about 
other things. But he soon 
found that he had made a 
mistake. This good woman, 
who loved the Church, had heard about the 
Conference at the Church, and it was perfectly 
natural for her to ask about it. When she was 
told that it was in the interest of the Church's 
Program and that an Every-Member Canvass 
would be made, she made a special request for 
the canvassers to be sent to her for a pledge. 
When it was then explained to her that her in- 
terest would be appreciated as much as a pledge, 
she said : "I want to give. I love the Church and 
want to have a part in its work. My income is 
small, but I can give fifty cents a week." 

This is the spirit of many of the people of East 
Carolina. They love the Church and they want 
to give. It is the secret of our success in the past. 
It will mean even greater progress in the years 
to come. 



"And now abideth faith, hope, love, these three; 
but the greatest of these is love." — 1 Cor. 13:13. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Meanmioi of L©et 



George F. Hill 

BEFORE the third century Lent was observed 
only during the last two days of Holy Week, 
but soon grew to include the whole week. The 
Council of Nicea, 325, recognized a forty-day ob- 
servance of Lent as the universal custom. The 
forty-day custom was adopted in commemoration 
of the forty-day fast of Christ. In the early 
Church, penitence was the primary idea of Lent, 
and fasting was wholly incidental. In the Mediae- 
val Church, fasting became very strict until the 
evening of each day. Gradual relaxations were 
permitted until now the fast of Lent is more 
nominal than real. 

The meaning of Lent today, however, is of more 
importance to us than a knowledge of its history. 
What does Lent mean today? If briefly stated, 
but inadequately explained, it is a time set apart 
for whole-hearted soul-strengthening; a time for 
special emphasis on the deepening of one's whole 
spiritual life. 

The Episcopal Church has never practiced the 
emotional type of revival. Experience has proved 
that a quiet acceptance of Christ by study, prayer, 
and practice is more beneficial, real, and lasting 
than when one is swayed by a momentary emo- 
tion. 

But why, you may ask, does the Church stress 
this sort of spiritual deepening but for forty days ? 
Should it not be stressed throughout the whole 
year? It is like the inventory of a business which 
is taken, not all the year, but usually once a year, 
the results from which is to benefit the business 
throughout the year. Schooling is a good thing, 
but is kept but nine months in the year. Your 
vacations are kept at special times. Special con- 
ferences are held at stated times on all businesses 
and professions. These conferences teach new 
things, bring greater power for the whole year. 

Throughout the year, outside of Lent, your at- 
tention is divided among many things, and your 
time is allotted to them. During Lent you are ex- 
pected to cease from all social activities and all 
other activities possible that do not work directly 
for the strengthening of your spiritual life. But 
in giving up these various activities it is done 
for the sole purpose of using the time and result 
gained for the deepening of your religious life. 
You do not give up the theatre during Lent be- 
cause theatre-going is wrong, but because you 
want to clear your life during Lent of all less 
important activities in favor of the all-important 
cultivation of your acquaintance with God. Be- 
fore your husbands, brothers, and sons went to 



the battle field during the World War they first 
went to a training camp in order that by strict 
and careful training they would be the better en- 
abled to fight victoriously. Lent is such a camp 
for the Christian. 

The Church does not draft you for camp. You 
may accept or refuse the training. The Church 
suggests methods but imposes Lent on no one. 
It is within your gift of freedom of choice to pick 
up pebbles or rubies, weeds or lilies. To do noth- 
ing, however, during Lent is wasted time. It is 
like a ride on the merry-go-round. It may be 
amusing or boresome for the time being but in 
either case you are getting no where. Lent is 
conceived for the purpose of helping you onward 
and upward. 

The Church suggests a few methods for your 
training in camp. Try one at a time, then in- 
crease the number, and before Easter dawns see 
that every suggestion has been accepted and acted 
upon wholeheartedly. The list below perhaps 
does not include many things that meet your own 
peculiar needs. Add them. Use them. 

1. Attend every service. And while attending 
keep strict guard upon your mind that it does not 
wander. See that every word of the service and 
every act mean something real to you. Do noth- 
ing from habit; sing thoughts, not tunes. If, at 
the close of a service, a single versicle meant 
nothing to you, you failed in the service by losing 
an essential part. Practice to lose nothing. Only 
practice and concentration will teach you to wor- 
ship. 

2. Read the Bible. Reading the Bible will do 
you little good unless you do it for a specific pur- 
pose. Your purpose is to get from it a benefit to 
yourself. To do this you m,ust read slowly, with 
great concentration. Think while you read about 
how it applies to you. See if you can fit the cir- 
cumstances to yourself. Digest each thought 
fully before going to the next. If you cannot 
understand what you read, look it up in a com- 
mentary or ask some one who knows. Read regu- 
larly — not when other things are out of the way; 
but make your Bible reading a very important 
activity of the day. 

3. Pray. Make prayer a very important part 
of your daily life. Not when all else is out of the 
way, but make it second to none in importance. 
Keep your prayer appointments with God if every- 
thing else is left undone. Pray not by mere repe- 
tition of memorized words, but slowly, thought- 
fully, and seriously. Do not make your prayer 
appointments mere times for begging. Talk over 
everything. Without speaking often, imagine 
that Jesus, just as He appears to your imagina- 
tion, is sitting now before you, in that other chair. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Think that you can reach out and touch Him. 
Talk with Him. Do not hurry through your pray- 
ers. Take plenty of time. Jesus often spent whole 
nights in prayer. It may be hard at first, but 
soon it will become a real joy to pray at length. 
All through the day think of Jesus wherever you 
are. Think that He is with you, by your side, 
and listens to all you say, think, and hear, and 
sees all you do and all you see. Pray definitely. 
Be specific. Be real. Pray by name. Pray for 
your friends, naming them. Pray for those un- 
friendly to you, naming them. Pray for the ves- 
try, the rector, choir, organizations, and congre- 
gation. Pray for the Christian forces of the city, 
mentioning them. Pray for those in authority — 
justices, judges, etc. Pray for missionaries, nam- 
ing them. Pray by name. Have a list and use 
certain names today, others tomorrow, and — stick 
to it. 

4. Bring others to service with you. Interest 
others in the Church worship. Go out of your 
way to get them. Bring them. To stop after the 
first or second failure is cowardice. When you 
bring them help them to find what it is to worship 
in spirit and in truth. 

5. Each day make it a purpose to engage some 
one in conversation about religion or prayer. 
Never controversially, but religiously. Converse 
on those things wherein you agree. Make your 
conversations spiritually helpful. Do not argue. 

6. Visit and make friends with those you do 
not like and those who do not like you. Try ear- 
nestly to see their good qualities, for they have 
them, and if you'll be Christian and open-minded 
enough you will find them. Make yourself to like 
them and they will like you. 

7. Do nothing by word or deed that reflects on 
any one's integrity or honesty. Say or think noth- 
ing bad or critical about any one. If you can say 
nothing good about a person — say nothing. It 
is because of an unchristian spirit that keeps one 
from seeing good in other people. It is a mean 
disposition that causes one to speak badly about 
any person. Never permit any one to entice you 
to participate in criticisms. 

8. Find out your chief weaknesses or besetting 
sins and by doing their opposites continually, pur- 
posely, doggedly, thereby automatically free your- 
self of them. This may mean for you to fast in 
order to destroy your mastering appetites. This 
may keep you from the theatre in order to destroy 
your conquering passion for pleasure. It may 
mean that you must give away a great deal of 
your money in order to break your inordinate love 
of money. Make a full and conscientious analysis 
of yourself, not as you want to be, but just as 
you are. 



9. To some persons confession is a great help. 
If you are one of these go to some real Christian 
man or woman and confess everything to them. 
Talk with them about yourself, your trials and 
fears. Ask for advice and assistance in your 
battles. Together in Christian prayer — where two 
or three are gathered together, you will find Jesus, 
and whatsoever you ask will be given you. 
LENT MEANS SPECIAL TRAINING 
TO LIVE. 



Bi§hop 9 § Letter 

To the Clergy and Laity of East Carolina. 

My dear Brethren : — This is to inform you that, 
through the generosity of the original donors and 
the Executive Committee of Camp Leach, we have 
been able to secure this valuable and attractive 
property as a Summer Conference and Training 
Center for the Diocese of East Carolina at a nomi- 
nal cost. 

The property in question comprises twenty 
acres of land and is situated on the Pamlico River, 
some fourteen miles from Washington, N. C. 

The permanent improvements on the property 
are valued at about seven thousand dollars, and 
include a large central building, two dormitories, 
a kitchen, small storeroom and an excellent flow- 
ing well. We were able to acquire the entire prop- 
erty for §1,400, and just as soon as contributions 
to cover the purchase price are received we will 
solicit subscriptions amounting to five thousand 
dollars in order to put in electric lights, adequate 
water and sanitary facilities and the necessary 
additional buildings. A Steering Committee has 
been appointed, composed of the following per- 
sons: Rev. Frank D. Dean, M.D., Rev. Stephen 
Gardner, Rev. I. deL. Brayshaw, Mr. Junius D. 
Grimes, and Mr. Taylor Attmore. 

Dr. Dean and the other members of the Com- 
mittee are hereby authorized to solicit subscrip- 
tions for the purchase and equipment of the prop- 
erty, and I have asked Mr. Junius Grimes, of 
Washington, N. C, to act as treasurer until a more 
permanent organization is effected. 

The acquisition of this property will mean 
much, not only to the youth of our Diocese, but 
to our people generally, as it is our purpose to 
make it the training center for our Religious Edu- 
cation, Missionary, Social Service, and Evangelis- 
tic Work. We have long desired such a Confer- 
ence Center in East Carolina, and I know you will 
rejoice with me that our hopes are being realized. 

May I count on your sympathetic and generous 
co-operation in the carrying out of our plans. 
Yours faithfully, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Dioeese of East Carolina 
Acquires Caoip Leadh 

ON Monday, March 3rd, at a luncheon given 
by the Rector of St. Peter's Church at the 
Patrician Inn, the Diocese of East Carolina took 
over Camp Leach, a camp situated on the Pamlico 
River ten miles below Washington. There were 
present at this luncheon the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. 
Darst, D.D.. Bishop of the Diocese; the Rev. 
Frank Dean, M.D., leader of the Young People of 
the Diocese; Frank Cox of the Eureka Lumber 
Company, owners of the land, P. P. Maxwell, rep- 
resenting the trustees of the camp; T. Harvey 
Myers, Mayor of Washington; Junius D. Grimes, 
local attorney for the Diocese ; Taylor B. Attmore, 
Superintendent of the Church School of St. Peter's 
Parish ; John G. Bragaw, representing the laymen 
of the Diocese ; the Rev. Sidney Matthews, priest- 
in-charge of Zion Church, in which Parish the 
camp is situated; Walter Taylor, of Wilmington, 
superintendent of camp construction, and the Rev. 
Stephen Gardner. 

Camp Leach was established eight years ago 
by the citizens of Washington for the boys and 
girls of the city and of the eastern section of the 
State. Enthusiastic citizens raised §5,000 to put 
buildings on an 18-acre tract of land situated on 
the Pamlico River ten miles below Washington, 
the land being given by the Eureka Lumber Com- 
pany to a board of trustees who should hold it as 
long as it was used for a camp. Provision was 
made that it could be purchased in fee simple at 
any time upon the payment of the sum of $1,000. 
Captain George Leach, the president of the 
Eureka Lumber Company, was one of the pro- 
moters. Through him a road into the camp was 
constructed and the grounds cleared. On account 
of his generosity and also his love for the boys 
and girls of East Carolina the camp was called 
Camp Leach, which name will be retained by the 
Diocese. 

Groups of boys and girls from many places in 
East Carolina have been using this camp during 
these eight years, but no provision was made for 
the upkeep or for improvements. A debt to the 
Eureka Lumber Company, originally $1,500 but 
gradually diminished to about $400, which was 
growing larger each year on account of the in- 
terest, remained unpaid. Camp Leach, with the 
best beach on the north side of the Pamlico River, 
was destined to be no more. A committee from 
the Diocese, including the Rev. Frank Dean and 
the Rev. Stephen Gardner, made a trip to the 
camp a few weeks ago and decided that it was just 
the place for the Diocesan camp. Plans were im- 



mediately made to get it for the Diocese. When 
the stockholders of the Eureka Lumber Company 
learned that the Diocese was to get the camp they 
generously relieved the Diocese of the interest 
that had accumulated on the debt, thus making 
the purchase price in fee simple $1,395. 

Work on the reconstruction of the camp will be 
begun immediately, including the installation of 
electric lights, telephone, waterworks, and plumb- 
ing. The barracks will be doubled in size, making 
room for 200 campers at one time. A large dining- 
room with kitchen will be built, the present dining- 
room and kitchen being transformed into an in- 
firmary. A new pier will be constructed. A base- 
ball diamond will be laid out as. well as a dozen 
tennis courts. An open-air chapel will be built in 
a grove of trees where the devotional services will 
be held. 

The camp will be the Conference Grounds and 
the Religious Center of the Diocese, taking care 
of the Young People's conferences, and also those 
of the Woman's Auxiliary, the Laymen, and the 
Clergy. It is situated ten miles east of Washing- 
ton on Highway No. 91, then four miles south to 
the river. It adequately meets the demands of 
the Diocese, and is destined in a very short time 
to be one of the most up-to-date conference 
grounds in the State. It is situated at almost the 
geographical center of the Diocese, and can be 
reached by motor within four hours from any 
place in the Diocese. The camp committee ap- 
pointed by the Bishop at this meeting consists 
of the following members : The Rev. Frank Dean, 
M.D., of Wilmington, Chairman; the Rev. I. de L. 
Brayshaw, of Wilmington, and the Rev. Stephen 
Gardner, and Messrs. Taylor B. Attmore and 
Junius D. Grimes, of Washington. 



)©rvi©© 



Rev. C. E. Williams 

FROM the beginning the Church has stood as 
"a rock in a weary land," sending forth her 
shadows of peace and comfort to all who were 
tired and disappointed in the desert of life. 

The sparks that fell from that first crude altar 
of our forefathers have penetrated the hearts of 
men and women, and through their inspiration 
the pages of history have become ablaze with 
deeds of sacrifice and love. We have built and 
have built well; we have seen the Church grow 
in numbers until today we have steeples reaching 
toward the skies in every hamlet and town. We 
have seen churches and cathedrals built of the 
most expensive materials as an everlasting me- 
morial to God. We have seen men and women 
dedicating their lives to the cause of Christ in 



THE MISSION HERALD 



distant lands. We have seen the most cultured 
and wealthy counted upon our rolls. We have 
seen the character and lives of men changed 
under our leadership. Indeed we have wrought 
a wonderful work for the Kingdom. Pioneering 
for Christ has been a thrilling adventure, and 
we have almost conquered the frontiers. But as 
we realize this, let us ask ourselves this question : 
"What are we expected to do with all of this 
stored-up power and zeal?" 

It is true that the primary function of the 
Church is to win the allegiance of the soul to God, 
but if we are brought to look upon God with 
correct reverence and love and to see Him as 
the Father of all men, our souls cannot rest until 
it utters itself in a distinct service to others. 

As vice-chairman of the Department of Social 
Service I am writing this to all of the parishes 
in this Diocese with the sincere hope that this 
year may bring forth a renewed interest in the 
service to others. Let us remember that wher- 
ever there is a real need the Church, as the or- 
ganized Spirit of Christ in the world, must seek 
to meet that need. The Church must claim for 
its own the whole range of human life. 

Does your Church and its people know the needs 
of your community? Let me give you the ex- 
perience of one county in this Diocese. This county 
is located in a section where the Church had its 
beginning in this State; from this county have 
come some of our leading citizens and churchmen. 
The people of that parish felt that the needs of 
the community were well taken care of ; the rector 
felt that the whole county was well churched, but 
a real survey was made, and here are the results : 
Five hundred and thirty homes were visited. 
There are one thousand three hundred and 
twenty church members; eight hundred and 
seventeen who attend no church of their own de- 
nomination. There are one thousand two hun- 
dred and thirty-eight who attend Sunday school, 
seven hundred and nineteen who do not attend. 
There are six hundred and thirty-eight who at- 
tend church regularly, five hundred and eighty- 
nine who attend poorly, and two hundred and 
thirty-nine who never attend at all. These are 
serious facts to us, I am sure, and we feel that 
no such conditions exist in our own communities 
and counties. Yet T wonder, if we took the sur- 
vey if our communities would show up much bet- 
ter, or would the facts be as encouraging? 

Do you know the families in your community 
who are in need of your friendship and help for 
their happiness? There are unlimited opportuni- 
ties for us to bring health, strength, and joy to 
every person in our midst. 



Do you know the needs of the children in your 
parish for clean and wholesome recreation? This 
phase of life is most important, yet all of the 
young do not have the privilege to enjoy it. We 
may find an approach to this work through the 
public school. 

The reason that we have not done more Social 
Service Work in past years is not altogether 
lack of interest, but an acute lack of knowledge 
of the needs. Our people will respond with all 
that they have if they are shown the necessity. 

May I suggest in closing that I w6uld ask each 
parish during the coming year to learn their 
people's needs, if we cannot do more, and then 
next year adopt a program best suited in each 
case. 

The cry of the times is "Come over and help 
us." What is our answer to this call? We can 
measure the value of Christianity to us by our 
answer. 



PARAGRAPH NEWS 



Dr. Frank D. Dean held a Mission at Ahoskie 
in February. 



Rev. W. H. Milton, D.D., has been away for a 
short period of time in Baltimore and at Clifton 
Springs. 



Rev. W. R. Noe,. Mr. George C. Royall, and Mr. 
T. H. Patrick, Sr., attended the Interracial Con- 
ference at Raleigh, March 4th. 



Bishop Darst has made two trips to New York 
recently for meetings of the National Commis- 
sion on Evangelism and the Commission on Evan- 
gelism and Life Service of the Federal Council of 
Churches. 



Rev. Alexander Miller, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Apportionment and Appropriations, and 
Rev. W. R. Noe recently visited some of the 
churches in the Belhaven group in the interest of 
the report of the Joint Committee, which will be 
considered at the next meeting of the Annual Con- 
vention. 



The Church Army will begin work next week in 
the field now served by the Rev. Mr. Dean. They 
have just finished five weeks of work in the Ay den 
group of churches. 

The Rev. W. R. Noe will serve the churches at 
Lumberton, Red Springs, and Maxton for the next 
few months. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. 

CALLS FOR SERVICE 



IN this issue many workers are called for. Here 
are several opportunities for real service in the 
field. The harvest truly is great. The laborers 
are now being called for. 



GOOD LENTEN EXERCISE 



IF one is seriously interested in making himself 
more Christ-like he will find rich thought for 
meditation, self-examination, and humble prayer 
in reading Moffatt's translation of 1 Cor. 13:4-7. 
After reading these four verses through a few 
times, then for the word "love" substitute the 
words "a Christian." Ask yourself, after thus 
reading it several times slowly and seriously, if 
you are living up to your lights. 

"Love is very patient, very kind. Love knows 
no jealousy ; love makes no parade, gives itself no 
airs, is never rude, never selfish, never irritated, 
never resentful ; love is never glad when others go 
wrong ; love is gladdened by goodness, always slow 
to expose, always eager to believe the best, always 
hopeful, always patient." 



SPECIAL SERVICES 



SCARCELY a week passes that most rectors do 
not receive requests for him to hold a special 
service on some specified day in the interest of 
some organization's pet idea. These requests 
come from every kind of organization. Many of 
them deserve consideration. But who shall decide 
which shall be accepted and which shall go the 
way of the waste basket? 



We think it a good idea to send EVERY request 
to the waste basket unless it carries with it the 
request of the Bishop of the Diocese that same be 
observed, or else the Bishop of the Diocese write 
through the executive office a special letter mak- 
ing such a request. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

PRACTICALLY every job has its own troubles. 
These troubles are often caused entirely by 
others, and are wholly unnecessary. 

We sympathize with the Executive Secretary 
of the Diocese in trying to get every parish and 
mission to send in its parish report in time to be 
tabulated and printed for the May convention. 

These reports should be sent in at once to Mr. 
Noe on forms furnished by him. All rectors of 
the Diocese should see that this report is sent in 
without delay. Where the parish or mission is 
vacant, the Wardens should see that this report 
is sent in at once. If the Wardens have no form, 
write the Rev. W. R. Noe, Wilmington, N. C, for 
one. 



CHURCH ARMY CANDIDATES DEPT. 



Church Army receives about four times as 
many requests for service as it can respond to 
with its present staff. 

Fifteen Americans are now on our staff of 
evangelists, but we need many more. 

Can you bring our work before the young men 
of your Church ? Our training is free, and pocket 
money is provided during training. After com- 
missioning, a small but sufficient salary is guar- 
anteed, and provision is made in the event of 
sickness, accident, or death. Our work is sanely 
evangelistic, and as wide in scope as is the Church 
of our allegiance. 

Applicants should be between 19 and 30 years 
of age, unmarried, and willing to remain single 
for three years after commissioning. 

The next term at our Providence Training 
School starts in September, but all candidates are 
expected to do some field work along with a senior 
man during the spring and summer. 

Further information will be supplied to appli- 
cants. Do help us. 

Yours to serve, 

B. FRANK MOUNTFORD. 



BISHOP DARST AT THE UNIVERSITY 



JUDGING by attendance and the unusual num- 
ber of entertainments, the Episcopal tea of 
the past Sunday afternoon was the most success- 
ful of the winter quarter. Given in honor of 



THE MISSION HERALD 



9 



Bishop Darst of Wilmington, the affair attracted 
a large number of students and townspeople to 
meet the Bishop and to enjoy the musical pro- 
gram. 

Rev. and Mrs. A. S. Lawrence, with Mrs. John 
H. Anderson ,the hostess for these teas, welcomed 
the students and introduced them to Bishop Darst, 
who mingled formally with the boys and co-eds. 

Mr. Urban Holmes, of the romance language 
department, gave a group of two baritone solos, 
accompanying himself on the piano. Following 
Mr. Holmes, Jack Wardlaw's Banjo Boys gave sev- 
eral popular selections, including a few old tunes. 
The musical program was concluded with music 
by Bill Stringfellow's Orchestra, which also played 
for the singing of several hymns. 

Tea, sandwiches, and candy were served by the 
ladies of the parish. 

Bishop Darst was the dinner guest Sunday at 
the Beta Theta Phi Fraternity house and at sup- 
per of St. Hilda's Guild of girls at the Rectory. 



GOOD SHEPHERD, TOLAR-HART 

Rev. Howard Alligood 

DURING the two years since the organization 
of our Young People's Service League the 
attendance has been good, averaging twenty-five 
members at each meeting. 



Officers are elected three times a year, in this 
way training the different members to conduct 
meetings. The meetings are held on Sunday 
nights in the Community House, with Mrs. Alli- 
good as supervisor. 

In addition to our general program, during the 
past eight months we have sent one of our League 
members at Sanatorium a subscription to our city 
paper, remembered him with gifts at Christmas, 
and furnished him with a number of books. 

Interest in the Service League continues to 
grow, and we hope to accomplish much during this 
year. 



ST. JAMES, BELHAVEN 

THE work of the Parish is going forward splen- 
didly under its new rector, Mr. Worth 
Wicker. Mr. Wicker was ordained to the priest- 
hood in St. James just before Christmas. His 
splendid enthusiasm and estimable personality 
have greatly endeared him to the community. 

In November Mr. Wicker organized an Altar 
Guild which is making some lovely new altar 
linens and hangings. 

The Parish has undertaken some much-needed 
repairs to the church, also an addition — a new 
choir room — is being planned. Plans are being 
made for this work, and the Parish earnestly 
hopes to have it completed within the year. 



(©ffirial Qlljurcb, |3apcr of the JBtocesc of ^East Carolina 
REV. GEO. F. HILL, Business Manager ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. 



March 15, 1930. 
To the Rector, or 
President of Any Parish Organization: 

During Lent the Mission Herald will give a commission on subscriptions secured as 
follows : 

Ten per cent on renewals. 

Twenty per cent on new subscriptions. 

Several Guilds in the past have made money in this way for their Mite Boxes. You 
can easily do the same. 

This work is best suited for a Guild of adults, though the young people's organi- 
zation can do the work under competent supervision. 

If some one in each parish and mission will undertake this work and send me her 
name, we will send the list of all present subscribers in her parish or mission, together 
with all dates of expiration. 

The Mission Herald should have a subscriber IN EVERY FAMILY of Episcopalians 
in the Diocese. 

For any further information, write 

THE MISSION HERALD 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ST. JOHN'S, WILMINGTON 



A most enjoyable get-together meeting was 
held in the Parish house of St. John's 
Church on Thursday night, February 20th. 

The auditorium was beautifully decorated with 
gray moss and various colored balloons, which 
were suspended from overhead. 

Twelve tables were most appropriately deco- 
rated with objects pertaining to the month they 
represented. Time and space forbid a detailed 
description of how very artistic they were. 

As the name of each table was called, a fitting 
stunt was given. 

A spelling bee followed. 

Every one enjoyed the delicious repast served, 
which consisted of a salad course and ices. 

Although the meeting was held to bring to- 
gether the congregation and create interest, and 
not as a financial project, still a neat little sum 
was realized. 



cellent religious reading. The children are en- 
couraged to sell a copy to their own households. 
One boy has sold ten copies and is ready for more. 



ST. PAUL'S, EDENTON 



There was recently given to St. Paul's Parish, 
Edenton, by the Misses Pettigrew, of Tryon, N. C, 
the Bible and Prayer Book formerly owned and 
used by their great-grandfather, the Reverend 
Charles Pettigrew, Rector of St. Paul's Parish and 
first Bishop-elect of North Carolina (1794). Both 
of these books are of octavo size; the Bible was 
printed at Cambridge, England, by John Arch- 
deacon in 1773, and the Prayer Book at Oxford, 
by T. Wright and W. Gill in 1773. The Bible has 
not in it the blank pages for family records, but 
on its fly-leaves are entered "The Births of Ne- 
groes. Cs. Pw.," fifty-seven in number, with dates 
ranging from 1740 to 1807. The autograph 
"Charles Pettigrew" occurs repeatedly, in a deli- 
cate handwriting. The Prayer Book's margins 
contain some changes from the English use to 
adapt it to the American, e.g., omitting the prayer 
"for the Royal Family." It contains "The Table 
of Kindred and Affinity" and Brady and Tate's 
metrical version of the Psalms. 

These books will be treasured by the Parish 
along with copies in folio size of Prayer Book and 
Holy Bible formerly used in St. Paul's. 

The public observance of Lent began with a 
good attendance of the women on Ash Wednesday, 
the menkind being conspicuous by their absence. 

The children made a good beginning of their 
Thursday's shortened Missionary Evening Prayer. 
Mite Boxes were given out on the Sunday before 
Lent. Copies of "The Spirit of Missions" are sold 
by the children, each sale putting five cents into 
a Mite Box and putting into circulation some ex- 



Sunday nights the Rector's addresses carry out 
the recommendation for "The Open Confirmation 
Class." 

ROBERT B. DRANE. 



^Thompson Orphanage & Training-^ 
| Institution |: 

£ Rev. W. H. Wheeler, Editor % 

<«M^^X^K-><^^»H»>4»XKK»X-XKK»X^»WK»X»X^ 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTEND- 
ENT TO BOARD OF MANAGERS 
FOR YEAR 1929 



SINCE the last meeting of the Board we have 
lost by death Col. A. H. Boyden, of Salisbury, 
who for many years was a loyal and devoted mem- 
ber, always deeply interested in the progress and 
development of the Home. 

In November Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Bynum of 
Farmville came into residence and Mr. Bynum at 
once entered upon his duties as Assistant Super- 
intendent. Bringing to this position rare tactful- 
ness and a most pleasing personality, Mr. Bynum 
has already made for himself a warm place in the 
hearts of all the Orphanage family. His cheeri- 
ness, even at 6 a. m. when he leads the boys to 
the barn to milk, and his willingness to turn his 
hand to any job, whether on the farm or at the 
laundry or in the office, has endeared him to every 
one. His ready helpfulness and that of Mrs. By- 
num, too. can be felt in a pronounced measure 
measure in every department of the life of the 
Home. 

Until quite recently, when visitors came to see 
the Orphanage, we showed them with greatest 
pride and joy our fine cottages, our Kindergarten, 
our Library, but we felt very reluctant to show 
them the Chapel, in fact we did not take them to 
see it unless they particularly requested our doing 
so. Since the remodeling and beautifying of the 
Chapel by the Committee in charge, consisting of 
Rev. R. B. Owens, Chairman; Rev. John L. Jack- 
son and Mr. Francis 0. Clarkson, we have reversed 
the order of our SIGHT SEEING TRIPS. Now the 
Chapel is the first place to which we escort visi- 
tors ; we are very proud to show it off, and we all 
feel that it is the most beautiful church in the 
three Dioceses. Words fail us to express at all 
adequately our appreciation of the Committee for 
the fine work they performed in the making over 
of the Chapel, but we do wish, in this report, to 
record our gratitude and sincere appreciation for 



THE MISSION HERALD 11 

their conspicuously successful efforts. dren in the Kindergarten. Here fine character 

One hundred and twenty-six children* were foundations are laid in such essential traits as 

cared for in 1929 — 68 girls and 58 boys. reverence, courtesy, gentleness, quietness of 

88 spent the full year, ...... 32,208 days voice and manner. 

38 spent 6,644 days As far back ag the March meeting of the Ex _ 

Total number days care 38,842 days mitive Committee the condition of the Current 

Total number meals served 116,576 Fund was such ag to call forth & resolution au . 

20 children were placed, including one tenta- thorizing the treasurer to borrow money to meet 

tively placed in church family in Middleburg. salaries and outstanding obligations. Again in 

3 girls are in training at Episcopal Eye, Ear, the fall of the year a similar resolution was 

and Throat Hospital in Washington, D. C, and passed, and yet, due largely to the work of the 

are doing splendid work. Finance Committee in decreasing expenditures 

1 girl is in St. Peter's Hospital, Charlotte. and reducing the staff, the treasurer was enabled 

1 girl is in Vance County Hospital, Henderson. to end the ve ar without borrowing one penny and 

1 boy was placed in Jackson Training School, k p 

Concord. Surely this ought not to be only a cause for 

13 with relatives in re-established homes. satisfaction, but also a stimulus to our faith. 

15 children were received an done girl read- Since we have set up high standards of care for 

mitted. the children committed to us, let us have Faith 

Present number of children, 104—55 girls and to g0 forwa rd and continue to progress. If we 

49 boys. are ° om 8* to do the work at all, let us do it with 

Full orphans, 20. Half-orphans, b3. Both par- strict adherence to the most improved methods 

ents, 21. of cnild care ' never forgetting that understanding, 

Diocese of North Carolina, 65. East Carolina, sympathy, insight, and love are much more valu- 

25. Western North Carolina 14. a ^ e and effective in producing lasting results for 

Of course statistics and tabulations of various good than mere arbitrary and mechanical pro- 
kinds are very essential, but the real test of work £ rams and methods ; that character is still hand- 
with childretn is not found in the number cared made and heart-made and comes chiefly from the 
for, nor total number of meals served, nor per Personal and loving care of those to whom are 
capital cost, but in the quality of service rendered committed the responsibility for raising these 
as reflected in the physical, mental and spiritual littIe ones - Mav God S ive us wisdom both to per- 
development of the children. If they are happy and ceive and know what thin 8' s we ou S ht to do - and 
healthy and contented, and increasing in wisdom also ° race and Power faithfully to fulfill the same, 
and stature and in the love of God, the work is 
successful and abundantly worth-while. ADDISON HOSEA 

Regular services are held in St. Mary's Chapel 

in which the Superintendent is assisted by one of On December 18, at his home in Pikeville, oc- 

the older boys. A vested choir renders the music curred the death of Addison Hosea, after a short 

heartily, and the attitude of the children is rever- illness of peritonitis. Mr. Hosea was a brother 

ent an ddevout. of Frank Hosea, who died in October, 1928. The 

Six children were baptized and 12 confirmed Hosea family was the first to be baptized and 
during the year. The older children attend Sun- confirmed at the time when Rev. J. H. Dickinson 
day School at one of the City Parishes and the initiated the church mission at Pikeville in 1914. 
younge rchildren a Sunday School at the Orphan- Ever since that time Addison has been a faith- 
age, taught by Miss Nail, assisted by Mrs. Isely. ful member of the congregation. When the 

The past year St. Mary's paid its quota to the church building was completed last year he was 

Forward Movement in full and has over-pledged appointed by the Bishop as one of the committee 

its quota for 1930 more than five times. of three to conduct the affairs of the Mission. 

All children now attend the city schools save He had been treasurer for several years, and was 

those enrolled in the kindergarten and a few to a regular communicant. He is greatly missed in 

whom Miss Nail is giving special coaching and the church as also in the village, where he has 

attention, and three children of pre-school age. held many public offices. He is survived by his 

There are 51 in the grammar schools, 22 in wife and three boys, the oldest of whom, Addison, 

Junior High School, 4 in High School, 24 in Miss Jr., is a student at the college at Wilson. He is an 

Nail's School, and 3 of pre-school age. active worker in the Sunday school at St. George's, 

Invaluable training isg iven the younger chil- Pikeville. 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



f * * 

Woiraiiae 9 § Amraliairy 



Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Publicity Chairman 

AAr*ll*ll*f !*■ 1*11*1 1*1 1*1 1*1 I* 1*1 ■*■ 1*1 1*1 ■*■ II* I* * *■ 1*1 ■* * 1*1 ■*■ 1*1 I* *l 1*1 ■*■ 1*1 *l 1*1 *■ *l 1*1 

▼▼V *v tIUFVW VTi^lr%^tr V V W W V >"VVVVVVVVVVV , r*rV' 

AN APPEAL TO YOUNG WOMEN 



THE Missionary District of Shanghai, under 
Bishop Graves, is attempting a very difficult 
thing. Will you help ? 

They are appealing for ten educated young Chi- 
nese women to offer for religious work among 
their own countrywomen. Only so can the multi- 
tude of Chinese women be reached — women work- 
ing in the fields or washing clothes in the court- 
yards, women raising silkworms or working in 
modern mills, women learning banking or teach- 
ing school — with all the old principles swept away 
by the revolution, with an amazing gift of free- 
dom poured over their heads and no knowledge of 
God to show them the perfect law of liberty. 

In order to secure the ten Chinese women it is 
necessary that they have ten American women to 
kindle the fire. 

There are many educated Chinese women who 
are devoted Christians, loyal, hard working, and 
self-sacrificing, capable also, and very charming. 
But they have had no experience of initiating 
methods, of organizing forces. Now and for many 
years to come they will doubtless do only the same 
kind of work they see done by others. The first 
thing needed, therefore, is to show these girls the 
possibilities open to them in the way of evange- 
listic achievement. 

American women have a priceless inheritance 
in their knowledge of their own power of accom- 
plishment when they bind themselves together 
heart and soul to do a thing. The victory of the 
anti-opium movement and other social work in the 
future of this great land of China will be a by- 
product of the first essential achievement, the 
making known to the women of the country of the 
nature and the strength of the Holy Spirit. As 
God has worked through women in the past, so it 
is our privilege to reveal Him as working through 
us in China now. We have our Master's promise 
for the success of our work: "The gates of hell 
shall not prevail against it," gates, you see, not 
armies, solid, inert barriers of pride and ignorance, 
and selfishness, waiting for the attack. The task 
is gigantic, but God through history has given to 
the women of our nation the gift of faith. This 
faith we are now asked to share with the women 
of China. 

It is interesting to note that ever since the 
nationalist movement has brought about such a 



wave of patriotism throughout China, the most 
thoughtful of the Chinese clergy are still urging 
foreign missionaries to come to China and throw 
their energy and experience into the almost over- 
whelming task of evangelizing the great mass of 
the Chinese people. No talent, natural or acquired, 
will be wasted there, normal training or business 
equipment, love of literaturer or skill in music, 
public persuasiveness or a gift of friendship, ex- 
perience in promoting clubs or managing children. 
Much has already been accomplished; the pres- 
ence of educated Christian women in the Church 
now is proof enough of this. But there have been 
too few workers to allow of the joyful enthusiasm 
which comes from corporate action. We want the 
Chinese women to know this enthusiasm. We 
must first show it to them in operation. In city 
and country, among educated and uneducated 
women, there is no end to the development pos- 
sible in this work — interesting outsiders to desire 
this new thing, teaching those who have come to 
desire it. It all depends upon whether young 
women from America will go over and help them. 

Ten Chinese women, ten American women. 
Shall we get them? If you cannot go yourself, 
will you pray that others may see the vision, rise 
up and set sail ? 

Volunteers should not be under twenty-two and 
not over thirty-five; communicants of the Epis- 
copal Church, with a good education (preferably 
college), in good health, with ability to learn a 
language, and willing to take preparatory training 
for a year or two in this country. 

If you would like to hear further details of this 
work, write to the Rev. A. B. Parson, 281 Fourth 
Avenue, New York City. 



TO RECRUITING COMMITTEES AND MEM- 
BERS OF THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



WILL you please read this with special care? 
This presents our present urgent needs in 
the mission field. Bear in mind that merely in 
order to hold our present stand we must send each 
year new recruits to take the place of those who 
are retiring from the field. We are passing 
through a difficult financial period in which the 
Church has not done what it ought to do in the 
support of foreign work. Many of our foreign 
missionaries are discouraged. They will be deeply 
disheartened if we do not provide all the new 
workers necessary to carry on the existing work. 
Our present most urgent needs are as follows: 
Nurses for St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Shanghai; 
St. Luke's Hospital, Tokyo; St. Timothy's Hos- 
pital, Cape Mount, Liberia. 

Evangelistic workers for Kyoto, North Tokyo 



THE MISSION HERALD 



18 



and Kohoku, Japan; Baguio, Besac and Upi, the 
Philippines. 

Teachers: A kindergartner for Japan, a rural 
grade teacher for Porto Rico ; a grade teacher for 
St. Stephens' Chinese School in Manila, and for 
the Moro girl's school at Zamboanga, Philippine 
Islands. 

I am enclosing a special memorandum of impor- 
tance concerning the need for evangelistic work- 
ers in Shanghai. 

Before the summertime we ought to be able to 
find young women for these foreign posts. It 
will be a great encouragement to the workers on 
the field if we can do this. To do so will mean that 
we will have to pull together and make these needs 
known. In some place in the Church young people 
of the right make-up and with sufficient conse- 
cration ought to be found. Please use every means 
to give full publicity throughout your Diocese to 
these important needs. 

Do not forget that if there are special young 
persons who need further training, the Church 
can in some cases offer scholarships for further 
study. 

The chief need is to sound in no uncertain 
terms, near and far, the call for these workers. 

Further correspondence should be addressed to 
the Rev. A. B. Parson, 281 Fourth Avenue, New 
York City. 



RURAL WORK 



Dear Auxiliary President: 

Enclosed you will find a program like I sent 
you last year as a suggestion for Rural Work. 
Unless you have accomplished all of these projects 
we would like for you to use the same program 
for 1930. 

Please appoint an active Rural Chairman for 
your Auxiliary, as we hope to do some real worth- 
while work in this department. Send the name 
of your chairman to me as early as possible. 

Also would like to have a report of any work 
you did in your rural communities during 1929. 
If you did other things besides those listed on the 
program, would appreciate your reporting these. 

Wishing you much success in all of your activi- 
ties, I am 

Cordially yours, 

MRS. W. S. CARAWAN. 



PARISH PROGRAM OF RURAL WORK 



We suggest that each Auxiliary adopt the fol- 
lowing program of Rural Work and endeavor each 
year to accomplish such Of the projects as may 



seem advisable and possible. 

1. Make a survey for auxiliary and church ex- 
tension work in your community and county. 

2. Study rural conditions, plans, and efforts to 
improve them. 

3. Find opportunities for service for women of 
your church in the following ways: 

a. Hold pilgrimages to rural churches. 

b. Carry on personal evangelism. 

c. Develop work among the isolated by distri- 
buting Home Department literature. 

d. Help to establish new church schools wher- 
ever possible. 

e. Adopt parish and community programs. 

f. Assist in any way possible with the mission 
motor van. 



ST. BARNABAS, SNOW HILL 



THE Woman's Auxiliary of St. Barnabas, Snow 
Hill, meet twice each month, except during 
Lent, when we meet once each week. 

We study any books recommended by the edu- 
cational secretary that we can, but we put espe- 
cial emphasis on the study of the Bible. 

We answer the obligations as sent to us. We 
also sponsor an orphan fifteen years old. We 
have a membership of ten and an average attend- 
ance of eight. We do Social Service work in our 
own Auxiliary and in connection with the other 
organization in our town. 

We have had much distress among our mem- 
bers this winter. Our beloved president, Mrs. 
Morrill, has been in very poor health and has only 
been able to meet with us a few times. 

We are very thankful now that she seems 
stronger and is untiring in her work for the Mas- 
ter. Then, too, through the death of Mr. J. T. 
Exum, our church treasurer and the husband of 
our auxiliary secretary, we have suffered an irre- 
parable loss. 

MRS. W. W. WHITTINGTON. 



CHURCH PERIODICAL CLUB 



THE President of every branch of the Auxili- 
ary has received a letter asking that she 
appoint a Parish Secretary for the Church Peri- 
odical Club. Without representation, it is hard to 
deal with the various parishes. 

There are many opportunities for work in the 
Church Periodical Club, passing on our old maga- 
zines, either by hand or by mail, giving new sub- 
scriptions to individuals, to schools, missionaries 
in the field, and various other places. Much good 
may be done by collecting good magazines and 
distributing them to local institutions, jails, 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



county homes, hospitals, schools. Think of the 
opportunities awaiting us. Mrs Carawan suggests 
that the work of the Church Periodical Club and 
that of the Rural Department can in many in- 
stances go hand in hand, and we can readily see 
the advantage in such an arrangement. 

And now, a definite call has come — and we all 
like definite tasks to accomplish. Mrs. Jennie M. 
Howard, student worker at the East Carolina 
Teachers College, Greenville, wants some mission 
hymnals for use at the club meetings. Send con- 
tributions to me. Small donations from a number 
of the parishes will suffice. 

MRS. J. P. WATTERS. 

Director, 
Edenton, N. C. 



LETTER 



419 West 110th Street, 

New York City, N. Y. 
My dear Mrs. McMillan : 

I am writing only a few words to thank you for 
your interest and help in making it possible for 
me to come to St. Faith's. It is useless for me to 
write a long letter. I can't find words enough to 
express my appreciation, so I shall say just 
"Thank you and all others who have helped me." 
I know that I am going to get lots of things 
here that will help me in my work. This is such 
a wonderful place. The deaconesses are lovely. 
The girls here are fine, too. You feel as though 
you have known them for years. 
With best wishes, I am 
Sincerely yours, 

LONA B. WEATHERLY. 



"EXTRACT FROM A LETTER FROM MISS 
LINDLEY" 



ONCE again the Church is suffering the loss 
of its Presiding Bishop. We at headquarters 
had just begun to know what a joy it would be to 
serve under him ; and short as were his visits with 
us I am sure that he has left us a blessing. He 
was good enough to write this short Foreword for 
Miss Beardsley's booklet, "The Woman's Auxili- 
ary in the Life of the Church." 

"Two things stand out prominently in the life 
of the Woman's Auxiliary — high ideals and splen- 
did accomplishments. Its methods have been to 
study, to learn, and to pray. The results have 
been cheerful giving and magnificent benevolence 
throughout the whole Church. Its present aim 
is to make progress more progressive. I wish it 
'good luck in the name of the Lord.' " 



You will want to see that this booklet is widely 
distributed and used. It will be a great help to 
branches of the Auxiliary and other groups of 
women in planning their work. 

And now for some suggestions that were to 
have gone to you in the last Quarterly Letter, but 
were omitted at that time because of the impor- 
tance of the Advance Work Program. The Day 
of Prayer, kept on the first Friday in Lent (this 
year March 7th), is one of those joint efforts in 
which we take part. This year it is to be of very 
special importance because we are asked to re- 
member that we are to celebrate the 1900 anni- 
versary of Pentecost. Surely we shall be glad to 
share in any plans the women of the different 
communions are making, and very often the 
President of the Woman's Auxiliary or some other 
officer must take the lead in those plans. 

GRACE LINDSEY. 



BOX WORK 



Washington, N. C, 

The Christmas Box work of the Church Schools 
has made rapid progress, and it has been possible, 
by the co-operation of our loyal church people. 
Some of the parishes and missions have not 
pledged themselves to this wonderful work. It 
is the desire of your Box Secretary that every 
Church School in our Diocese have all the infor- 
mation concerning the Christmas Boxes, and that 
each Church School will take an assignment for 
this year of 1930. 

Our new book, "The Christmas Box," gives very 
definite help to the new parish Supervisor, Super- 
intendent, or Rector, and you should have a copy 
now. This book may be ordered through your 
local book store, or write to 281 Fourth Avenue, 
New York. 

Our foreign assignment has been received, and 
we should feel interested in sending Christmas 
cheer to the Alaskan children. We send "Gifts" 
to Alaska, and please state on your pledge cards 
whether you prefer foreign or domestic work this 
year. 

You can help me if you will kindly fill in the 
enclosed card, saying how many children or sea- 
men you can provide for. Please return the cards 
to me at once. My assignments will be governed 
by your reply. 

I shall be so glad to hear from you about an 
assignment for another year or any information 
I might send you about this interesting and im- 
portant work. 

Thanking you for your help, and trusting that 
together we may be the means of helping our 



THE MISSION HERALD 



15 



boys and girls to a fuller sharing with others the 
Christmas message of joy and gladness. 

MARY G. VON EBERSTEIN, 



Almighty God, the Protector of all who are op- 
pressed, look with pity, we beseech thee, upon the 



servants in their adversity patience to endure to 
the end, and courage steadfastly to continue in 
the faith once delivered to the saints. Stretch 
forth the right hand of thy majesty to maintain 
their cause ; and finally bestow upon them faithful 
unto death the crown of everlasting life. Through 



sufferings of thy Church in Russia. Grant to thy Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen. 



FINANCI AL ST ATEMENT 

Statement of Amounts Paid on Apportionments for the Church's Program- 

and General to March 1, 1930 



-Diocesan 



Resolution of Executive Council at January, 1930, Meeting 

"On motion of the Chairman of the Committee on Apportionment and Appropriations, it was 
decided to accept for this year the 1929 apportionments, with the understanding that the matter 
will be sriven further consideration at the Annual Convention." 



FIRST 

Location Parish Apportionment 

Edenton. St. Paul's $ 3,000.00 

Wilmington, St. James" 13.380.00 

Woodville. Grace Church 500.00 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 100.00 

Winterville, St. Luke's ._. 200.00 

SECOND 

Creswell, St. David's 700.00 

Elizabeth City. Christ Church 2,415.00 

Fayettevllle, St. John's 4.300.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 1,500.00 

Greenville. St. Paul's 2,100.00 

Hertford. Holy Trinity __■ _ 1.000.00 

Kinston. St. Mary's 2,500.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 4,000.00 

Plymouth, Grace Church' 400.00 

Washington St. Peter's _ 4,500.00 

Wilmington St. John's 3,000.00 

Wilmington St. Paul's 1,995.00 

Windsor. St Thomas' 600.00 



THIRD 



Ayden, St. James' ._ 

Beaufort,, St. Paul's 
Belhaven. St. James' 

Bonnerfon, St. John's .... 

Clinton. St. Paul's 
Gatesville. St. Mary's 
Hamilton. St. Martin's 
Roper, St. Luke's 
Southport, St. Philip's 
Williamston. Advent 
Winton. St. John's 
Columbia. St. Andrew's 

Farmville. Emmanuel 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 
Snow Hill. St. Barnabas' 
Warsaw, Calvary 
Whiteville, Grace Church 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 

Morehead City, St. Andrews 
Swan Quarter, Calvary 



320.00 
600.00 
600.00 
100.00 
400.00 
200.00 
100.00 
360.00 
250.00 
300.00 
200.00 
300.00 
530.00 
125.00 
200.00 
80.00 
90.00 
100.00 
100.00 
70.00 
60.00 



FOURTH 

Atkinson. St. Thomas' 100.00 

Aurora, Holy Cross _ 500.00 

Bath. St. Thomas' 
Chocowinity. Trinity 
Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
Griftou. St. John's 
Hope Mills. Christ Church 

Jessania, Zion . _ 126.00 

Lake Landing, St. George's 125.00 

New Bern. St. Cyprian's 400.00 

Red Spring's. St. Stephen's 100.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 240.00 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 50.00 



100.00 
100.00 
200.00 
250.00 
150.00 



Paid by Paid by 

Parish Ch. School 

$ 217.30 $ 

1,219.30 



8.46 
40.00 



100.00 



275.00 
161.80 



28.40 



34.15 



20.84 



15.00 



26.00 



8.93 
22.50 
69.91 



Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

Wilmingto-i, St. Mark's 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 

Edenton, St. John-Evangelist 

Edward, Redeemer 

Elizabeth City, St. Philips'.. 

Fairfield, All Saint's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Lumberton, Trinity 

Maxton. St. Matthew's 

North West, All Souls' 

Sladesville. St. John's 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Washington, St. Paul's _ 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Kinston, Christ Church 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 

Pikeville, Mission .. 

Pollocksville, Mission .". 

Robersonville, Mission 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 

Campbelton, St. Phillip's 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn'', Mission 
Wrightsville. St. Augustine's 



300.00 

200.00 

105.00 

150.00 

25.00 

26.00 

20.00 

50.00 

50.00 

100.00 

25.00 

50.00 

30.00 

75.00 

126.00 

150.00 

100.00 

60.00 

40.00 

100.00 

50.00 

50.00 

75.00 

60.00 

10.00 

50.00 

48.00 

25.00 

26.00 

45.00 

100.00 

65.00 

30.00 

15.60 

20.00 



20.00 



10.00 



21.00 



2.00 



$56,033.00 $ 2,299.48 



OUR PROBLEM 
Receipts 

(To March 1, 1930) 
From Parishes and Missions on Appor- 
tionments $2,299.48 

Disbursements 

(To same date) 

General Church Quota $1,000.00 

Bishop's Salary 1,000.00 

Stipends of Missionary Clergy and others 4,098.20 
Other Budget Items 605.86 



Total $6,704.12 



The Parishes and Missions can help us solve 
this problem by remitting monthly. 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Virginia 
Episcopal School 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 

Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
lege and University. Modern 
equipment. Healthy location in 
the mountains of Virginia. Cost 
moderate, made possible through 
generosity of founders. For cat- 
alogue apply to 

Rev. Wm. G. Pendleton, 
D. D., Rector 






Church Furnishings 

Gold, Silver and Brass 

Church and Chancel 
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Write for Catalogue for 
Episcopal Churches. 

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SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 

Bank With Us By Mail 

JULIAN WOOD, President. 
W. 0. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



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AND JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 years' college 
An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter receive her 
education in a church sehool. 

Rev. Warren W. Way, A. M., Rector 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. Indoor 
work all fully accredited by the Southen Association. Also 
Courses in Music, Art, Expression, Home Economics, and Business. 
Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback Riding. 

For Catalogue and View Book address 
A. W. Tucker, Business Manager 



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Altars,Pulpits,Lecterns,Fonts,Fabrics,Embroideries r 

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For information call 837, or write 
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Embroideries, Clerical Suits, 
Silks, Cloths, Fringes 

HATS, RABATS, COLLARS 

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NORFOLK-SOUTHERN 

Passenger Schedules 
Effective December 29, 1929, via Norfolk 
Southern Railroad, Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Lv. 12:15 P. M.— Raleigh, New Bern, Golds- 
boro, Beaufort and inter- 
mediate points. 

Lv. 10 :25 P. M. — Raleigh, New Bern, Golds- 
boro, Beaufort, Charlotte, 
Fayetteville and intermed- 
iate points. Sleeper to Ra- 
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Lv. 5 :50 A. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. 

Lv. 2 :50 P. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Connections North 
and West. 
For further information, reservations, etc. 
apply to 

J. H. TUCKER, Ticket Agt. 

Elizabeth City. N. C. 



For all kinds of pipe organ work Write 

C. E. GRANT 

28 Washington Street, Portsmouth, Va. 

Twenty-seven years experience in Church organ 
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THE MISSION HERALD 



APRIL INDEX 

Page 

Bishop's Letter 3 

Bishop's Appointments 4 

"God's Neighbors and Ours" 4 

"From Strength to Strength" _.__: 7 

Annual Convention 9 

Sunday School Offerings to the Orphanage 9 

Editorials 10 

The New Apportionment 11 

St. Mary's, Kinston 14 

St. Matthew's, Yeatesville 1 14 

Christ Church, New Bern 16 

Woman's Auxiliary — 

Annu al Meeting 16 

Advance Work 17 

Education Work 17 

Elizabeth City Meeting 18 

Student Work at E. C. T. C 18 

In Memoriam, Dr. W. W. Dawson 18 

Financial Statement 19 



CHURCH CALENDAR 



April — 

20— Easter White 

27 — First Sunday after Easter White 

28— St. Mark Red 



May- 
1 



St. Philip and St. James Red 

4 — 2nd Sunday after Easter White 

11 — 3rd Sunday after Easter White 

18 — 4th Sunday after Easter White 

25 — 5th Sunday after Easter White 

26 — Rogation Monday ____ Purple 

27 — Rogation Tuesday Purple 

28 — Rogation Wednesday Purple 

29 — Ascension Day White 



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The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, APRIL, 1930 



No. 4 



Bishop's Letter 

ON Sunday, March the second, I visited the 
Church in the Aurora field and spent a most 
interesting day with my good friends in that 
splendid section of Beaufort County. 

At the morning service I preached, confirmed 
two persons and celebrated Holy Communion in 
the Church of the Holy Cross, Aurora. 

In the afternoon 1 
preached in St. John's 
Chuifh, Bonnerton, 
and baptized two in- 
fants. At night 1 
preached in the au- 
ditorium of the pub- 
lic school building in 
Edward. 

On Monday, the 
third, I attended a 
conference on the 
proposed Diocesan 
Camp in Washington. 

On Thursday, the 
sixth , I attended a 
meeting of the Com- 
mission on Evangel- 
ism and Life Service 
of the Federal Coun- 
cil of Churches i n 
New York. 

On Sunday, the 
ninth, I preached in 
St. Philip's Church, 
South port at 11 A. 
M., and addressed the 
Y. P. S. L. of St. 
James' Church, Wil- 
mington, at 7 P. M. 

On Tuesday, the 
eleventh, I preached 
Mount Pleasant, S. C. 



RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

Bishop of East Carolina 



On the evening of the sixteenth, I preached in 
St. Andrew's Church, Morehead. 

On Sunday, the twenty-third, I preached. Dedi- 
cated three memorial windows and confirmed eight 
persons, presented by the Rev. W. A. Pearman, 
in St. Mary's Church, Kinston. at 11 A. M. 

On the afternoon of the twenty-third, I preach- 
ed, and confirmed eight persons, presented by the 
Rev. James E. Holder, in St. Augustine's Church, 
Kinston. 

On Tuesday, the 
25th, I attended a 
memorial service to 
the late Presiding 
Bishop, Rt. Rev. C. 
P. Anderson, D. D.. 
in St. James' Cathe- 
dral, Chicago. 

On Wednesday, the 
twenty-sixth, I at- 
tended a meeting of 
the House of Bishops 
in St. James' Cathe- 
dral, Chicago, and 
participated in the 
election of a Presid- 
ing Bishop. The Rt. 
Rev. James De Wolf 
Perry, D. D., Bishop 
of Rhode Island, was 
elected Presiding 
Bishop on the seven- 
th ballot and I trust 
that the Clergy and 
people of East Caro- 
lina will join with me 
in praying that he 
may have the 
strength and wisdom 
to carry on his great 
work for Christ and 




in St. Andrew's Church, 
at 8 P. M. 

On Thursday, the twelfth, I preached at a Com- 
munity Lenten service in Grace Church, Charles- 
ton, S. C, at 8 P. M. 

On Sunday, the sixteenth, I celebrated Holy 
Communion in St. Paul's, Beaufort, at 8 A. M. 
and preached, confirmed eleven persons presented 
by the Rev. J. A. Vache, and received one from 
the Roman Catholic Church, at 11 A. M. 



His Church. Our new Presiding Bishop is earnest, 
willing and consecrated, and with the loyal sup- 
port of the Church, he should accomplish a great 
work. 

In response to a cordial and repeated request 
from my good friend, the Rev. Charles A. Ashby, 
I conducted a preaching mission in the beautiful 
new Church of the Good Shepherd, Jacksonville, 
Florida, from Sunday March 30th through Friday, 
April the 4th. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



On Sunday, April the sixth, at 11 A. M., I 
preached, and confirmed eleven persons, presented 
by the Rev. Alexander Miller, in St. Paul's Church, 
Wilmington. 

On Sunday night of the sixth, I preached, Dedi- 
cated a processional Cross, and confirmed eleven 
persons, presented by the Rev. E. W. Hallock, in 
St. John's Church, Wilmington. 

This issue of the Mission Herald will contain a 
very important article. "The New Apportion- 
ment and the New Program" and I earnestly urge 
the Clergy and people of the Diocese to read this 
article very carefully. 

It is especially important that the delegates to 
the coming Diocesan Convention should study the 
article in order that they may vote intelligently 
on the proposed plan. 

With best wishes for a bright and blessed 
Easter, I am, 

Faithfully and affectionately, your friend and 
Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



God's Neighbors and Oofs 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS 

From Easter to June 1. 



Easter Sunday, April 20 — 

Good Shepherd. Wilmington, 11 A. M. 
St. Mark's, Wilmington, 7:30 P. M. 

April — 

24. Executive Council and Clergy Conference, 
Camp Leach. 

27. Christ Church, New Bern, 11 A. M. 
St. Thomas', Jasper, 3:30 P. M. 
Christ Church, New Bern, 8 P. M. 

28. Grace Church, Trenton, 8 P. M. 

29. St. Paul's Church, Vanceboro, 8 P. M. 

May— 
4. Si. Peter's Church, Washington, 11 A. M. 
Zion, Jessama, 3 P. M. 
St. Peter's Church, Washington, 8 P. M, 
6. St. Paul's Church, Newport News, Va. 

11. St. John's Church, Fayetteville, 11 A. M. 
St. Joseph's Church, Fayetteville, 8 P. M. 

13. Diocesan Assembly Brotherhood of St. An- 
drew, St. Paul's, AVilmington, 8 P. M. 

14-15 Annual meeting of Diocesan Convention, 
St. Paul's Church, Wilmington. 

18. Holy Innocent's Church, Lenoir County, 
11 A. M. and 3 P. M. 

22. St. Cyprian's Church, New Bern, 8 P. M. 

25. Trinity Church, Lumberton, 11 A. M. 
St. Stephen's, Red Springs, 3 :30 P. M. 
St. Matthew's Church, Maxton, 8 P. M. 



Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D. 

"God so loved the world that He gave His only he-got- 
ten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him shoidd not 
perish, but have everlasting life." — John 111:16. 

THESE WORDS of our Lord to Nicodemus are, 
perhaps, the most comprehensive utterance 
of our Lord, and therefore of Christianity. They 
contain the whole of the Gospel. Almost every 
word, from article to proper noun, is pregnant 
with meaning, and revolutionary in teaching — 
any one of which would have turned the pagan, 
and even Jewish world, upside down. The utter- 
ance was revelation pure and simple; nothing like 
it had ever been spoken, or even conceived, before. 
Nothing like it could have come from below, from 
the uninspired lips of man; it had to come from 
above, and hence it fell naturally from the lips 
of the Son of God. 

The point that I wish you especially to note 
is that these words — this revelation of our Lord — 
are missionary in import, more missionary even 
than the words which constitute the parting com- 
mission of the Master to His disciples — "Go ye 
into all the world and preach the Gospel to every 
creature." And they are more missionary be- 
cause they are more distinctively Christian, not 
in spirit, but in substance. Mohammed might 
have said to his followers, "Go ye info all the 
world, and deliver my message to every crea- 
ture" : Buddha might have said it. Though the 
fact is that they never did ; although their fol- 
lowers in the present, roused by the missionary 
zeal of the Christian Church, are beginning to 
emulate the Church's activity along these lines as 
a mere policy of self preservation. 

But neither Mohammed nor Buddha, nor any 
other founder of heathen religions, could ever 
have declared that "God so loved the world that 
He gave His only-begotten Son, that whosoever 
believeth in Him should not perish, but have 
everlasting life." And, if for no other reason, 
because they did not believe it. They had no 
Gospel for the world at large. They had no con- 
ception of a love of God which included any other 
people than their own. In practice, they pro- 
claimed no message of everlasting life: they only 
preached conquest by the sword, and the other 
held out as the only hope annihilation. The su- 
preme interest of both was the here and the now. 
It was for Christ and Christianity alone, to pro- 
claim a Gospel and salvation for all, "Jew and 
Greek, Barbarian, Scythian, bond and free." It 
was for Christianity alone to exercise a world- 
wide ministry of love, that was based upon the 
crucifixion of God, and the self-crucifixion of man, 



THE MISSION HERALD 



for the sake of man. It was for Christianity alone 
to hold out the imperishable hope of a godliness, 
profitable not only for the life which now is, but 
for the life which is to come ; and to change the 
whole spirit and tenor of the present life by the 
illuminating influence of the future. 

But familiar as are these distinctively Christ- 
ian conceptions to the Christian world, the world 
which is heir of 19 centuries of perpetual teach- 
ing based upon such a Gospel as that contained 
in the words of this great text, every one who 
stops to think must realize how far even the 
Christian world is from any adequate apprecia- 
tion of the far-reaching meaning of such a de- 
claration as that before us — that "God so loved 
the WORLD." The world ! Not alone the privil- 
eged nations or communities or individuals, who 
have chanced to come within the charmed pale 
of Christian influence and are rich in the heritage 
of its blessings ; but the world — all men, every- 
where — the Gospel is to them and for them, re- 
gardless of all appearances to the contrary. Does 
the so-called Christian world believe it? Judged 
by our actions in the main, is not our practical 
faith rather, that God loves us, the people of 
Christendom, that He has a particular affection 
for the American portion of Christendom, and the 
love of a father only for that especial set in so- 
ciety, that favored portion of humanity, known 
as privileged classes? As to His attitude toward 
the submerged masses, even in our own borders, 
are we quite sure that He is seriously concerned 
for their own welfare? 

The truth is, I fear, as has been said, that 
"even to-day, with all the widening out of thought, 
with all the brilliant generalization of the philo- 
sophers, with all the hands of steel that girdle the 
planet and bring the continents together, with 
all the marvels of steam and printing and electri- 
city which make men masters of space and con- 
querers of time, so that we are all citizens of one 
city, having Central Asia and Central Africa for 
suburbs, still we are behind the thought of Jesus 
Christ. We are not yet as wide-minded as He 
was. We are still content with the limits of a 
provincial and parochial Christianity. We still 
need sermons on foreign missions." What we do 
not realize is that we need them, because we need 
sermons on Christianity. For foreign missions 
are only Christianity raised to its highest power. 
They simply mean our duty to our neighbor, when 
he is removed from the next door to across the 
seas. Our real trouble is that we do not love our 
neighbor as we should :when we do, it will make 
little difference in our attitude towards him 
whether he lives in the next house, or the next 
block, or at the ends of the earth. Our real trouble 



is, that we are too much in love with ourselves 
to bother much about where our neighbor lives, 
so long as he does not disturb us in our love for 
ourselves. When we learn to love him as our- 
selves, it will make little difference where he lives ; 
and the man who loves his next-door neighbor 
best and treats him accordingly, will love his 
neighbor across the seas best also. There is no 
such thing as a charity that really begins at home, 
ending there. It will expand until it covers the 
earth. 

If that be true then, we shall not be surprized, 
when we go back to a study of the circumstances 
and conditions under which Jesus spoke these 
words of our text, to find that He was not preach- 
ing what we would call a foreign missionary ser- 
mon at all. He was preaching on conversion, on 
regeneration, on the beginning of the Christian 
life in the experience of the individual. He was 
teaching the individual Nicodemus the first prin- 
ciples of the spiritual life, giving him his first 
lessons in the essential requirements of the 
Christian religion. And to this astounding phrase 
— the very name of whose religious sect meant 
"Separatist" — He gives, as the foundation princi- 
ple, on the Godward side of which religion rests, 
the statement, "God so loved the WORLD !" He 
declares the first step, as well as the last, in the 
realization of the Christian Gospel, to be faith in 
foreign missions; because Christianity is foreign 
missions, losing one's life for the sake of the other 
fellow, in order to find it for one's own sake. 

I wonder if any of us, when we say he does not 
believe in missions, or only takes a half-hearted 
interest in them to the extent of dropping a be- 
grudged offering on the plate for that object be- 
cause he cannot well get out of it, I wonder if he 
realizes how much like this Pharisee, Nicodemus. 
this "Separatist", this man who thought the world 
was made for him and his little religious sect, 
this narrow sectarian who thought that God's 
love was exhausted when it had made him com- 
fortable in this life and had provided for his 
eternal bliss in the next— I wonder if he realizes 
how much he himself is like this Pharisee in his 
habits of thought and action? Disbelief in mis- 
sions, luke-warmness or indifference towards the 
spread of the Gospel beyond one's own doors, does 
not begin with such disbelief, my friends. It has 
its roots far back in the individual's thought and 
life. It is part and parcel of the way in which he 
looks at life and its duties in all their relation.;. 

Who of us, for example, is altogether free from 
the feeling, whether encouraged or not, that the 
little circle in society into which his lot was cast 
by birth belongs to him by right ? That its privil- 
eges and comforts are his to use pretty much as 



THE MISSION HERALD 



he chooses ? That his money is his to spend wholly 
on himself, if he chooses, or that if he gives any 
of it away, he deserves unstinted praise for his 
generosity? That his time is his to flitter away 
if circumstances and fortune permit, or if he uses 
any of it for the good of others, that it is not at 
all by force of any obligation but only because his 
generous impulses have led him to give it? In 
fine, that he is so little indebted to the past to 
whose generosity to him he has hardly given a 
thought, that he has no debt to the present or 
future? 

You constantly hear individuals talking as 
though they had a perfect right to spend their 
money and their time and their strength just as 
they choose, provided they are guilty of no crime 
against society or the state. If they are rich, 
speaking of the poor, as though the poor should 
be grateful to them for the mere expenditure of 
their money, thus putting it into circulation, and 
enabling the poor to earn some of it by their 
toilsome service ; as though they were really help- 
ing the poor by their extravagance. These lines, 
homely enough, and bitter enough, touch the heart 
of the matter: 



Now Dives daily feasted and was gorgeously arrayed, 
Not at all because he liked it, but because 'twas good 

for trade; 
That the people might have calico, he clothed himself 

in silk, 
And surfeited himself with cream that they might 

have more milk. 

He fed five hundred servants, that the poor might 

not lack bread, 
And had his vessels made of gold that they might 

have more lead; 
And e'en to show his sympathy with the deserving 

poor, 
He did no useful work himself that they might do 

the more. 

You find the same sort of thing in the social 
and civic relationships among men. The uncon- 
scious attitude towards those who live outside 
the pale of the particular community or so- 
cial set in which these self-complacent individuals 
live ; towards whom they feel no social duty at all, 
looking upon whatever effort they choose to put 
forth for the betterment of the conditions under 
which the less-favored are forced to live, as purely 
gratuitous; thinking of their own protected and 
comfortable position as God-given for the sole 
benefit of their own welfare. Feeling towards 
themselves much as the selfish soul, depicted by 
Tennyson in "The Palace of Art", as it thus re- 
joices: 

God-like isolation which art mine, 

1 can but count thee perfect gain, 



What time I watch the darkening droves of swine 
That ramje on yonder plain. 

In filthy sloughs they roll a prurient skin, 
They graze and wallow, breed and sleep; 
And oft some brainless devil enters in, 
And drives them to the deep. 



Nor are the sacred relationships of the Church's 
life altogether free from this spirit of selfish pos- 
session, and as the result of an arbitrary election 
on the part of God of certain individuals and 
peoples to special privileges. And the difference 
between those who are possessed by this spirit 
is not at all one of kind ; their difference is merely 
one of degree. With some their religious horizon 
is bounded by their pew which they inherited 
along with their wealth, and about which they 
have the same sort of feeling of exclusive posses- 
sion that they have about the rest of their proper- 
ty; or the pew for which they pay in hard cash 
so much per quarter, and therefore guard with 
the same air of jealous ownership that they do 
the high wall which surrounds their town lot, and 
excludes all unwelcome intruders. With others, 
the parish Church is the extreme limit of their 
interest. To provide for its comfortable furnish- 
ing and service, to see that in all things it offends 
not. their sensative aesthetic tastes; to respond 
to whatever demands may reasonably emulate 
from its chancel for the work of the parish with- 
in their little community — that is all that invites 
their concern or disturbs their equanimity. With 
others it is the Church of their native State — 
dear to them because of a patriotic love of which 
they are proud- — or the Church of their mother 
country, sacred to the memiory of their fore- 
fathers, w T ho made it what it is, and which they 
would keep as it is for their children who are to 
come after them — these are the utmost limits of 
the little religious world which they love, and 
which, they therefore draw the conclusion, is the 
only world which God loves. 

This is not sarcasm, my friends, at least not 
intentionally so. I have only tried to put matters 
in their true light, and to trace any conception 
of Christianity that is short of taking the whole 
habitable world within the scope of its operations, 
to its real roots, in a mistaken conception of 
Christianity altogether, not only in its larger re- 
lations to mankind but to its demands upon the 
individual in his smallest circle of experience and 
association. What I have tried to show you from 
what you see in your everyday experience and 
observation, is that disbelief in our indifference 
toward what we call "Foreign Missions" — our duty 
towards the fartherest member of the race — is 
at its bottom disbelief in Christianity and begins 
with more or less indifference towards the needs 



THE MISSION HERALD 



of the man who lives in the next house to you. 
It has its roots in a selfishness, which character- 
izes the individual's conduct in the simplest re- 
lationship of life. 

Many years ago, when only an annual offering 
for general missions was taken with the supreme 
desire to get the largest offering possible, with 
the least friction, for that most impoverished 
work of the Church, I followed the plan of sending 
envelopes for "Foreign Missions" only to those I 
felt quite certain had a hearty interest in that 
object. Their number was comparative small. To 
a larger number, who I feared were indifferent on 
the subject, I sent envelopes for "General Mis- 
sions." While to the few who I had reasons to 
believe were opposed to foreign missions, I sent 
envelopes for "Domestic Missions." This was the 
result: Few of the "Domestic Missions" envel- 
opes came back at all; the response from the 
"General Missions" envelopes while good was not 
large; while the "Foreign Missions" envelopes 
were all returned, and their contents were almost 
equal to the combined offerings of all the others 
which largely exceeded them in number. And, 
I make bold to say, that had I carried the compar- 
ison fqrther, I should have found that those who 
gave most generously for "Foreign Missions" were 
the main stay in parochial support. 

Pardon me for this discursion into practical 
experience. Pardon me still further if I have 
seemed harsh or ungenerous. It has only been 
in your interest if I have been either. Not pri- 
marily in the interest of the family to which you 
belong, the whole family of mankind of whom 
Jesus Christ is the Elder Brother and God the 
Father, but in your own individual interest. Be- 
cause I would have you Christians in every sense, 
in the larger sense by the possession of the 
larger Charity toward all man kind, as well as in 
the little sense in which you strive to live in love 
and Charity toward him who is your next-door 
neighbor. Because I desire for you the largest 
conception of the love of God — such a love as that 
of which Jesus spoke when He said "God so loved 
the world that He gave His only-begotten Son, that 
whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but 
have everlasting life." Because only so you build 
the loftiest and the truest and the richest char- 
acter ; only so can you ever rise to the heights that 
you were destined to attain-the plane upon which 
He stands of whom it is written that "He died for 
our sins and not for our sins only, but for the sins 
of the whole world." Because I would have your 
help in doing what you can to change the con- 
dition confronting our Church to-day, of a world 
with open doors through which the Church's wait- 
ing ambassadors must delay to pass because of 



the meager offerings of her members. 

How long-aye how long-will the Church's poets 
need to pen such lines as these, ere the Church's 
children heed their plaintive cry and give no long- 
er of their self-calculating parsimony, but of their 
self-sacrificing abundance ? 

"If I have eaten my moi-sel alone!" 

The patriarch spoke in scorn ; 

What would he think of the Church were he shown 

Heathendom, huge, forlorn. 

Godless, Christless, with soul unfed, 

While the Church's ailment is fullness of bread, 

Eating her morsel alone? 

"I am debtor alike to the Jew and the Greek." 
The mighty Apostle cried; 
Travesting continents souls to seek, 
For the love of the Crucified. * 

Centuries, centuries since have sped; 
Millions are famishing; we have bread, 
But we eat our morsel alone. 

Ever of them who have largest dower 

Shall heaven require the more. 

Ours is affluence, knowledge, power, 

Ocean from shore to shore; 

And East and West in our ears have said; 

"Give us, give us, your living Bread." 

Yet we eat our morsel alone. 

"Freely, as ye have received, so give," 

He bade, who hath given us all. 

How shall the soul in us longer live, 

Deaf to the starving call; 

For whom the blood of the Lord was shed 

And His Body broken to give us bread. 

If we eat our morsel alone? 



From Strength it© Sitreeith 



"Small things become great when a great soul 
sees them." 

It was a little thing for the janitor to see a 
lamp swinging in the Cathedral at Pisa, but in 
that steady swaying motion the boy Galileo saw 
the pendulum and conceived the idea of thus 
measuring time. 

Bits of glass arranged to amuse children led to 
the discovery of the kaleidoscope. A ship-worm 
boring a piece of wood suggested to Sir Isambard 
the idea of a tunnel under the Thames at London. 
Tracks of extinct animals in the old red sand 
stone led Hugh Miller on and on until he became 
the greatest geologist of his time. 

"All life comes from microscopic beginnings. 
In nature there is nothing small. The microscope 
reveals as great a world below as the telescope. 
All of nature's laws govern the smallest atoms 
and a single drop of water is a miniature ocean." 

As Emerson has said: 



8 



THE MISSION HERALD 



"The creation of a thousand forests is in one 
acorn." 

In his book, "The Training of the Twelve", 
Bruce says: 

"All beginnings are more or less obscure in ap- 
pearance but none were ever more obscure than 
those o f Christianity. What a n insignificant 
event in the history of the Church, not to say of 
the world, this first meeting of Jesus of Nazareth 
with five humble men, Andrew, Peter, Philip, Na- 
thanael and another unnamed ! It actually seems 
almost too trivial to find a place even in the evan- 
gelic narrative." But the Master could look be- 
yond this little group and see a great work to be 
done and a bright future for His Church. He 
said to them : "Lift up your eyes and look on the 
fields for they are white already to harvest." 

Since that day, the work of the Church has 
spread to all parts of the world. It has been 
small at first - a mission here and there, and in 
our country or missionary district to care for 
them, but the missions have become parishes and 
the districts dioceses when there were great souls 
to see the opportunities and take advantage of 
them. 

In July 1912, two great souls, the Bishop of the 
Diocese and his faithful Archdeacon saw much 
opportunity at Lumberton, the County seat of 
Robeson. 

Only a few members of the Church, seven in 
number, could be found in Lumberton and the 
immediate vicinity at the time, but they were 
called together and arrangements were made for 
the Archdeacon to hold a service each month. The 
pastor and congregation of the Presbyterian 
Church very kindly offered their Church building 
for these services and for the first six months they 
were held there. 

Then services were held in the homes of some 
of our people for a short period. 

It was soon realized that a Church building of 
our own would be necessary. Our people were 
few in number, but they were also great souls, 
and could see the wonderful opportunities all a- 
round them. 

In January 1913, arrangements were made to 
purchase land and construct a simple wooden 
building. The building was completed in 1915 
and was consecrated by Bishop Darst, the first 
Church in the Diocese to be consecrated by him. 

After the completion of the Church building, a 
lay reader was appointed and from that time 
Sunday services have been held regularly in the 
Church. 

At this time a branch of the Woman's Auxiliary 
with three members was organized. For many 
years these three women held regular meetings 



and did their part of the work — then others mov- 
ed to the town and became members. There are 
now ten members of this organization, and they 
are still doing their full part of the work. 

On February 28, 1928, the Brotherhood of St. 
Andrew was established with eleven members. 
This chapter has been very active from that date 
and has been largely instrumental in establishing 
chapters at Fayetteville and Southport and then 
in practically all the self-sustaining parishes of 
the Diocese. For a period of nearly twelve months 
this organization held services at Lumberton, 
Maxton and other points. 

A few weeks ago, a Young People's Service 
League was organized. These boys and girls 
read the service each Sunday evening and pre- 
sent a very interesting program to the whole 
congregation. 

Since the work was started at Lumberton, there 
have been periods when the people -were without 
the services of a clergyman for months at a time. 
There have been other things to discourage them 
but they have had vision enough to hold on and 
to see that services were held l-egularly. 

This mission has become one of the outstanding 
pieces of missionary work in the Diocese. ' Great 
souls there have made it a great work. There 
are now over 40 confirmed persons in the City 
and about 25 in the Church School. 

The members of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew 
and of the Young People's Service League are 
holding daily services, including most of the Sun- 
day services, during this Lent and they are re- 
ceiving the support of the other members of the 
congregation. 

The Mission has given one of its fine young 
men to the ministry. He is now a student at the 
Virginia Seminary and will probably be ordained 
Deacon this year. 

In his book, "Pushing to the Front", Mr. Mar- 
den says : "What the age wants is men who have 
the nerve and the grit to work and wait, whether 
the world applaud and hiss ; a Mirabeau, who can 
struggle on for forty years before he has a chance 
to show the world his last reserve — a Michael 
Angelo, working seven long years decorating the 
Sistine Chapel with his matchless 'Creation' and 
the 'Last Judgment', refusing all remuneration 
therefor, lest his pencil might catch the taint of 
avarice — a Thackeray, struggling on cheerfully 
after his 'Vanity Fair' was refused by a dozen 
publishers — men whom neither poverty, debt, nor 
hunger could discourage or intimidate; not daunt- 
ed by privations, not hindered by discourage- 
ments. It wants men who can work and wait." 

At Trinity Church, Lumberton, we have men, 
women and young people who have been willing 



THE MISSION HERALD 



to work and wait. They have been lonely at 
times ; they have had many things to discourage 
them, but they have been faithful, with the usual 
result, that they have gone "from strength to 
strength." We have every reason to feel that 
this growth will continue and that the mission 
before very long will become a strong and useful 
Parish. 





nr^HE Forty-Seventh Annual Convention of the 
A Diocese of East Carolina will meet in St. 
Paul's Parish, Wilmington, May 14 and 15, 1930. 
PROGRAM 
Resolution of Convention of 1927. 
RESOLVED, That the Executive Secretary of the 
Diocese be requested to prepare, with the consent 
and approval of the Bishop and Executive Coun- 
cil, a program or agenda of the matters to come 
before the next Convention and have it type- 
written or printed and sent to each delegate at 
least two weeks before the meeting of the Con- 
vention, including report of Committee on the 
State of the Church. 

MAY 14, 1930. 

1. Celebration of the Holy Communion-7:30 
A.M. 

2. Organization of Convention - 10:00 A. M. 

3. Annual Address of the Bishop. 

4. Business Session. 

Special order 11 :00 A. M. - The Report of the 
Joint Committee. 

Regular oi'der of Business (See Rules of Or- 
der) . 

a. Committee on Elections. 

b. Committee on New Parishes. 

c. Standing Committee. 

d. Treasurer. 

e. Committee on Finance. 

f. Committee on Cartons. 

g. Committee on Unfinished Business, 
h. Committee on the State of the Church. 
i. Trustees of the Diocese. 
j. Trustees of the University of the South. 
k. Other Special Committees. 
]. Other reports, 
m. Petitions and Memorials. 
n. Motions and Resolutions. 
Among the important matters to come before 

the Convention are the following: 

1. Election of Delegates to the Provincial Synod. 

2. Discussion of the Report of the joint Com- 
mittee of the Executive Council on Ap- 
portionments, Appropriations and Expen- 
ditures. The Committee has recommended a 
change in the method of apportionment. 



3. The Bishop's Address will contain suggestions 

requiring the serious consideration of the 
Convention. 

4. Addresses by Mrs. W. J. Loaring Clark on 

the Work of the Daughters of the King and 
by a representative of the National Council 
on The Advance Work Program. 

5. Annual Address of President of Woman's 

Auxiliary. 

6. Report of Commission on Evangelism. 

7. Report of Special Committee on the Thompson 

Orphanage. 

8. Report of the Committee on the State of the 

Church. 

9. Report of Committee on Insurance. 

10. Election of Editor and Business Manager of 
the "Mission Herald." 

11. Report of Executive Council. 
NOTE:-There will be a meeting of the Diocesan 
Assembly of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew on 
Tuesday, May 13th, in St. Paul's Parish House. 

A Quiet Hour for the delegates and visitors to 
the meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary will be 
held Tuesday evening. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFERINGS TO 
ORPHANAGE 



RESOLVED: That the Treasurers of the 
Sunday schools be instructed to remit prompt- 
ly to the Treasurer of the Diocese of East 
Carolina and that the Mission Herald be re- 
quested to publish quarterly, the amounts 
sent in by each Sunday school. 
Offerings sent direct to the Treasurer of the 
Diocese to the end of the first quarter, March 31, 
1930. 

St. Paul's Sunday School, Greenville S 5.16 

St. Paul's Sunday School, Beaufort 11.89 

St. Mary's Sunday School, Gatesville 3.00 

St. Philip's Sunday School, Southport „ 2.00 

Christ Church Sunday School, Eliz. City 22.07 

Holy Tnnocents' Sunday School, S. Springs 4.00 
Zion Sunday School, Jessama 5.80 



Total ...$ 53.92 



OFFICES OF INSTRUCTION 



Churches will find a great deal of good in the 
frequent use of the Offices of Instruction found 
in the Prayer Book, beginning on page 283. This 
service could be used frequently at Morning or 
Evening Prayer. Many grown-ups have forgot- 
ten their catechism and know little of the real 
teachings of the Church. Frequent use of this 
service will greatly benefit the membership. Use 
it and find what a wonderful help it will give in 
instruction on what the Church teaches. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



<Pl* *1 



xbbxoix 



^Sentlfr 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



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Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMlLLAN 

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Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
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EASTER WISHES 



IT is the sincere wish of the Mission Herald 
that this Lent has been one of real spiritual 
value to all, and that the rest of the year will 
be blessed by the strength acquired through our 
Lenten devotions. May we grow in grace as the 
months unfold. May Easter find us truly happy 
as we rise with Christ and to go forth with Him 
stronger, steadier, with greater faith and love to 
do His will. 



THE NEW APPORTIONMENT 



^yr 7E urge every one to read carefully the ar- 
W tide "The New Apportionment", beginning 
on page 9. This should be read and studied es- 
pecially by the clergy and all delegates to the 
coming Diocesan Convention. 

This new plan will be the order of the day at 
eleven o'clock on May 14th. Another article on 
this proposed plan appeared in the February num- 
ber of the Mission Herald. "Honorandi Vel Dubit- 
andi". by Dr. Lay. This should also be read. 
Extra copies of both articles may be had at 8 
cents per copy, less in quantities of 10 or more. 
By a careful study of these two articles you will 
be able to vote intelligently upon this most im- 
portant subject at the Convention. 



GOD'S NEIGHBORS AND OURS 



GOD'S Neighbors and Ours", by Dr. Milton, 
beginning on page 4, should be read with 
care. Dr. Milton has taken what is, perhaps, the 
most familiar and loved text of the Bible and with 



it brought a message for the Church of enduring 
value. It should be read with especial care by 
those who find themselves luke warm toward 
"foreign missions." 



WORKING TOGETHER 



Ev^ERY rector and vestryman, as well as the 
membership of the parishes of the diocese, 
should turn to pagr. 19 and note the financial 
standing of his parish and especially read the 
paragraph following the full financial statement. 
If each parish and mission would see that a pay- 
ment is made EACH MONTH to the diocesan office 
it would not only greatly benefit the diocese in 
its work, but would also make it much easier for 
each Church to meet its diocesan quota. 



THE BROTHERHOOD ASSEMBLY 



IT is hoped that delegates from every chapter 
of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew in the dio- 
cese will be present at the Diocesan Brotherhood 
Assembly on the evening of May 13th, at St. 
Paul's Church, Wilmington. It is time, now to 
make preparations towards attending. 



ATTENDANCE AT CONVENTION 



EVERY parish that has entertained the Dio- 
cesan Convention knows only too well the 
difficulty encountered each year by the slow act- 
ion on the part of the parishes and missions in 
sending in names of delegates, when expected and 
how. 

An enormous amount of work is involved in 
entertaining the Convention. The clergy and 
presidents of the various woman's organizations 
could give a tremenduous amount of help to the 
entertaining parish by sending in the names of 
all delegates at the earliest possible moment and 
answering at once all information asked for by 
those in charge at St. Paul's, Wilmington. 



EACH PARISH AND MISSION MAY HELP 



IT is impossible for the clergy to visit other 
parishes to see what they are doing. To do so 
however, each rector would perhaps pick up some 
helpful schemes others have used with success, 
and thus he would be able to use same with good 
effect in his own parish. This is especially true 
with regard to Lent. 

The Mission Herald could serve each parish in 
this capacity if the rectors of the various parishes 
would write the Mission Herald about his Lenten 
activities, especially in regard to anything he is 
doing with marked success. Let us have your 
suggestions for the good of all. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



11 



The New Apportionment 
and the New Program 



AT a meeting of the Executive Council held 
in Wilmington in January 1929, a Joint Com- 
mittee was appointed, including the members of 
the Committee on Apportionment and Appropria- 
tions, the Chairman of the Committee on Evalu- 
ation, the Vice-Chairman of the Department of 
Missions and Church Extension, and the Vice- 
Chairman of the Department of Finance. The 
Bishop and Executive Secretary were members 
ex officio of the Committee. Three major tasks 
were submitted this Joint Committee for con- 
sideration, the Budget of the Diocese for 1929, 
the appropriations for Parishes and Missions for 
1929, and if it was deemed necessary, to prepare 
for presentation to the Convention a new method 
of apportionment for the Parishes and Missions 
of the Diocese. 

The Joint Committee gave considerable time 
to this work and presented its report to the Con- 
vention held in St. John's Church, Fayetteville, 
May 15, 16, 1929. It was the opinion of the 
Convention that more time was needed for the 
consideration and study of this report. It was 
referred to the next Convention and by resolution 
was made the order of business for eleven o'clock 
the first day of the Convention. The report has 
been in the hands of Clergy and people of the 
Diocese since* this Convention, and there is evi- 
dence it has received some consideration. It is 
the desire of the Joint Committee that the report 
be studied and understood by all, before the com- 
ing meeting of the Diocesan Convention to be 
held in St. Paul's Church, Wilmington, May 14, 
and 15. A meeting of the Clergy is scheduled for 
April 24th, at Camp Leach. This report is one 
matter to be presented for study. Following this 
conference, the clergy are requested to discuss 
the matter with their vestries and delegates to 
the Convention. This procedure should guaran- 
tee a thorough understanding of the report, and 
send delegates to the Convention prepared to 
speak and vote with understanding. The recom- 
mendations made in this report deal with matters 
of vital concern to the present and future of the 
Diocese. 

The purpose of this article is to restate certain 
outstanding features in the report, with com- 
ments thereon, and to correct certain erroneous 
impressions which may exist through failure to 
thoroughly understand these recommendations. 

First, let us give consideration to the apportion- 
ments of the Parishes and Missions of the Dio- 
cese. The present method of apportionment is 



based upon the number of communicants report- 
ed and the elected classifications of 5, 10, 15, and 
20 dollars per communicant. It is generally ac- 
cepted that this method is not a satisfactory 
one and it has little or no meaning today. The 
apportionments in force today, with few excep- 
tions, are based upon the number of communi- 
cants reported years ago. Regarding this matter 
the Joint Committee in its report makes the fol- 
lowing statement; "Your committee is of the 
opinion that it is necessary and urgent that a 
new method of apportionment for the Parishes 
and Missions be established." The experience of 
the past year has added meaning to this state- 
ment. 

The report proposes a new method of appor- 
tionment based upon the reported current ex- 
penses of the Parishes and Missions. (Current 
expenses being understood to include salaries of 
Rector, Organist, Chorister, Sexton, Lights, 
Water, Heat, etc., and not money spent for im- 
provements or increase in property holdings.) 
This method is used by the General Church in de- 
termining the amount the Diocese must pay for 
the general work of the Church, and it has been 
adopted by several Dioceses with satisfactory re- 
sults. It is based upon the ability of the Parish 
or Mission to pay. The following item taken 
from the report of the Joint Committee state its 
recommendations regarding this new method of 
apportionment and summarizes the advantages 
of the plan. 

FOR THE FUTURE 

That the Parishes and Missions of the Diocese 
accept as their goal an apportionment equal to 
100 per cent, of their reported Current Expenses. 

That the Parishes and Missions be classified 
using the reported current expenses for 1928 and 
the apportionments now in force as a basis for 
such classification. 

That five classifications be established: (A) 
those whose apportionments equal 90% or over 
of their reported current expenses; (B) those 
whose apportionments equal 70-90% of their re- 
ported current expenses; (C) those whose appor- 
tionments equal 50-70% of their reported current 
expenses; (D) those whose apportionments equal 
25-50 % of their reported current expenses; (E) 
those whose apportionments are below 25% of 
their reported current expenses. 

That all Parishes and Missions in Class A and 
B increase their apportionment for 1930 a like 
percentage as the reported increase in current 
expenses over the previous year indicates. 

That all Parishes and Missions in Class C in- 
crease their apportionment for 1930 — 5%. 

That all Parishes and Missions in Class D and 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



E increase their apportionments for 1930 — 10%. 

THE ADVANTAGES OF THE NEW 
METHOD 

1. The apportionment is based not upon the 
number of communicants but upon the ability 
to pay, as indicated in the amount spent for 
Current Expenses. 

2. The classification of the Parishes and Mis- 
. sions of the Diocese as presented shows where 

effort is needed and where effort must be made 
if the Diocese is to go forward. 

3. The Parish or Mission which has reached 
a high standard of giving has the assurance that 
a way is provided for those who have not reached 
such a standard to do so. 

4. If for good reasons a Parish or Mission 
must reduce its apportionment this method pro- 
vides that it immediately make the effort to ad- 
vance without undue strain or hardship. 

5. It is not a question of "Mow-Much" — it is 
a question of "As Miifch." 

6. Credit is given where credit is due, and re- 
sponsibility is placed where it belongs. 

7. This method provides for GROWTH— it 
shows the way — step by step. 

A splendid start has been made. Representa- 
tive Parishes and Missions already occupy envi- 
able positions in the new classifications. IT CAN 
BE DONE. 

The first statement "That the Parishes and 
Missions of the Diocese accept as their goal an 
apportionment equal to 100% of their reported 
current expenses" is a necessary one if the Dio- 
cese continues its present work, and makes some 
provision for the growth in the years to come. 

The recommendations that follow this first 
statement must be considered with this most im- 
portant fact in mind. 

On the basis of the reported current expenses 
of the Parishes and Missions of the Diocese the 
normal basis for every Parish and Mission paying 
its full share of the Budget is 70% of its reported 
current expenses. In this article we are using 
the reported current expenses for 1928 — approxi- 
mately $80,000 and the total apportionments of 
Parishes and Missions to care for the Budget for 
1929— approximately $56,000. 

This 70% of the reported current expenses of 
the Parishes and Missions of the Diocese, i. e., 
70% of $80,000 or $56,000 is necessary to provide 
the money required to care for the present ap- 
propriations as outlined in the Budget adopted by 
the Convention for 1929. In the light of this fact 
it is absolutely necessary for the Parishes and 
Missions to accept as their goal an apportionment 
equal to 100% of their reported current expenses, 



else there is no provision made for future growth. 

The eighteen Parishes and Missions that are 
today paying an apportionment of 70 to 150% and 
more of their reported current expenses must, of 
necessity, continue for the present, until the 69 
Parishes and Missions that pay below the normal 
basis increase their giving by the method pro- 
posed in this report. 

In this matter we are facing facts, 70% of the 
reported current expenses is needed for the ap- 
propriations made for 1929. Eighteen Parishes 
and Missions are giving on this basis, 69 are not. 
At this point we suggest you go back and re-read 
the recommendations of the committee. Based 
upon the need of the present alone without giving 
consideration for the future growth the reason- 
ableness and wisdom of the plan as outlined must 
be apparent. It is evident to all who study the 
Budget of the DioceSe that the Parishes and the 
Missions of the Diocese must accept as a mini- 
mum of responsibility an apportionment equal to 
70% of their reported current expenses if the 
work as outlined in the Budget be carried to com- 
pletion. 

The Parishes and Missions paying an apportion- 
ment below 70% should realize that other Parish- 
es and Missions must pay far above the normal 
basis of an average of 70%, the amount required 
for present apportionments, is obtained. 

IMPORTANT 

It should be noted that approximately 30% of 
the accepted apportionments of the Parishes and 
Missions is for the support of the Episcopate and 
other necessary Diocesan Expenses. This 30% 
we of necessity must pay — the remaining 70% we 
give for the support of our Diocesan Missions and 
for the work of the General Church. 

The second recommendation of the Committee 
is embodied in the following program: 

A PROGRAM 

Your Committee recognizes the fact that it 
should justify its request for the adoption of this 
plan which provides a gradual increase for the 
support of the Program of the Church. As re- 
lated to the work of the Diocese it presents for 
your consideration and adoption, the following : 

1. That in any Parish or Mission Field re- 
ceiving aid from the Diocese where a substantial 
increase is reported in Church School pupils and 
in the number of confirmations presented, and 
where the apportionments are paid in full each 
year, for a period of three years, the salary of the 
Rector or Missionary in charge be increased 
S300.00, the Diocese paying 50% and the Parish 
or Mission Field paying 50% of said increase. 

That a similar increase be made every three 



THE MISSION HERALD 



13 



years based upon the same requirements and plan 
until the Rector or Missionary shall have obtained 
an income equal to $3,000.00 a year. 

That the Parochial Reports received from the 
Parishes and Missions for 1928 be used as a 
starting point for this advance. 

That this increase apply to white and colored 
clergy alike. 

2. That any Parish or Mission Field receiving 
aid from the Diocese, failing to report an increase 
in Church School pupils and in confirmations pre- 
sented, and failing to pay its apportionment in 
full each year for a period of three years, the 
work in that Parish or Mission Field be referred 
to the Committees on Evaluation and Apportion- 
ment and Appropriations, who, after investiga- 
tion and study, shall report their findings and re- 
commendations to the Bishop and Executive 
Council. • 

Your Committee recommends that an increase 
of 20% for the three years should govern the 
action of the Diocese in making the increase sug- 
gested in its first proposal and a failure to report 
a 10% increase for the three years be sufficient 
evidence to warrant the action suggested in its 
second proposal. 

3. That money received for advance work be 
used, (A) for the development and extension of 
the Parishes and Mission Fields already establish- 
ed wherein the judgment of the Bishop and Exe- 
cutive Council, with an increased appropriation 
a more constructive work may be done; (B) For 
the planting and developing of the Church in such 
places where it is not established and where in the 
judgment of the Bishop and Executive Council a 
constructive work may be done. 

This plan rewards work well done. It gives to 
the man in the Mission Field who obtains results 
substantial encouragement. It provides for change 
in such fields where results have not justified the 
expenditures made. It provides for the opening 
of new fields. 

Your Committee is of the opinion that the adop- 
tion of this report provides: 1. The Diocese 
with a gradual increase in receipts— essential to 
its growth and expansion. 2. It gives the as- 
surance to contributors that the money will be 
spent to the best advantage in securing the de- 
sired results. 

There are 13 self-supporting Parishes and Mis- 
sions in the Diocese. The remaining 82 Parishes 
and Missions (a few Parochial Missions excepted) 
receive aid in some form from the Diocese. The 
money paid for the support of these fields helps 
to support 22 Mission Clergy. The Diocese has 
established a minimum salary basis for its. Mis- 
sionary Clergy, under present conditions this 



minimum is really the maximum. Strong men are 
needed in our Mission Fields. Strong men must 
be adequately supported. Strong men must be 
given assurance of increased support as necessity 
demands if they are to continue their work. The 
failure to make such provision has caused the loss 
of good men, and contributes to constant change 
in the personnel of the Missionary Clergy, a con- 
dition not conducive to the best interests of the 
Church. We must make it possible to obtain — 
to keep — and to advance the men who give them- 
selves to this work. 

The hope of the Committee is that the suggest- 
ed program will meet this need. Its one aim is 
to strengthen the missionary work of the Diocese. 
It would establish a standard of excellence with 
the hope that men would find joy in striving to 
reach it. It would commit the Diocese to a defin- 
ite policy, of recognition and advancement, for 
the men who prove their value and usefulness, 
and by their efforts contribute to the growth of 
the Church. 

The Committee recommends that certain per- 
centages govern the action of the Diocese in mak- 
ing the increases suggested in this program. The 
suggested percentages do not represent wild 
guesses or vain hopes. The .statistics of the Dio- 
cese, as a whole, measured by these requirements 
prove disappointing. There are certain fields in 
the Diocese where these requirements have been 
met, where marked progress has been made. 
These fields were studied and used by the Com- 
mittee in establishing its standard of excellence. 
One illustration is sufficient — and there are sever- 
al. In 1925 Columbia and Creswell, together, re- 
ported 92 communicants and 90 Church School 
pupils. In 1926-1927-1928, 29 were added by 
confirmation and 20 pupils were added to the 
Church School. In both cases more than the sug- 
gested increase. During the three years above 
mentioned these places paid their apportionments 
in full. The work in this field merits the increase 
of three hundred dollars suggested in the pro- 
posed program. The Diocese paying $150 and 
the field $150 of the said increase. 

The program provides that a similar increase 
be made every three years based upon the same 
requirements and plan until the Rector or Mis- 
sionary shall have obtained a salary equal to 
$3000 a year. 

It has been stated that this program would re- 
quire for the second Tri-ennium in any given case 
an increase of 44% and for the third Tri-ennium 
an increase of 79%. This is not the case. 

We cannot state definitely the percentage of in- 
crease for the second and third Tri-enniums. The 
increase suggested is 20%, based upon the num- 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ber of communicants reported at the end of the 
Tri-ennium. There are losses by death — remov- 
als — and transfers which might affect to a con- 
siderable degree the number of communicants re- 
ported at the end of the Tri-ennium, neverthe- 
less, this figure would be used as a basis for the 
next advance. 

There is sufficient evidence that the require- 
ments of this program have been met in one Tri- 
ennium — why not in the next — and the next — 
and the next ? We say it can be done. 

There is not and never has been any objection 
to growth. It is the business of the Church to 
get results. It is the work of the Clergy. It is 
"My Father's Business", "I came to seek and save 
the lost." The program of the Church has little 
meaning and it is questionable if the money ex- 
pended is justified if it fails to get results — and 
the meaning of results is the winning of souls to 
Christ. Results do come when men give them- 
selves to the task, and the Church must support 
and provide increased support as necessity re- 
quires to enable men to continue the work. 

If the Rector of a Parish succeeds in its recog- 
nized and usually in a substantial way. But it 
is not so in the Missionary Field. Regardless of 
the results obtained, the Missionary Clergy, under 
our present system, have no promise for the fu- 
ture. 

There is no shame in numbers. We rejoice and 
we should rejoice when increased * confirmations 
are reported — men and women, boys and girls, 
have accepted Jesus Christ as their Saviour. This 
is the work of the Church. At Pentecost there 
was rejoicing, and without doubt they counted 
the souls that day, for we have definite informa- 
tion that about 3000 souls were added to the 
Church. 

The one purpose of the program is to provide 
in a definite way for the present and future of the 
Missionary work of the Diocese. 

It has been suggested that a Clergyman might 
work for numbers and numbers only, in order to 
get the suggested increase. It is not likely that 
a man with such an outlook would work for three 
years to obtain an increase of $3000. There are 
other and more lucrative fields for such a person. 
A study of the report shows this to be unlikely 
if not impossible, for §150 of the $300 increase 
must be provided by the field in which the man 
works and from which the results are obtained. 
Such collusion for such a meager reward is past 
imagining. 

There may be Clergymen who are influenced 
by money and money only, but they are very, 
very few and very, very far between — if they ex- 
ist at all. But there are many cases where men 



have been handicapped and have suffered because 
of the failure of the Church to provide for their 
needs, and this is especially true of the Missionary 
Clergy of the Church. 

In conclusion, we must not measure the future 
by our short-comings of the past. We must es- 
tablish high standards and try to reach them. 
Such a program alone merits support — and only 
such a program will get it. 

(This article was prepared by the Chairman of 
the Joint Committee, the Rev. Alexander Miller, 
and the Executive Secretary of the Diocese, the 
Rev. W. R. Noe. A meeting of the Joint Com- 
mittee was held with the Chairman, the Executive 
Secretary, The Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., and Mr. 
Mc. B. Wilson, present. This article was read 
and approved. A few days later it was presented 
the Bishop and approved by him.) 



ST. MATTHEWS, YEATESVILLE 



Mrs. J. P. Bragg 

WE are having some beautiful and instructive 
Lenten services held by our Rector, Rev. 
Worth Wicker. Our congregations have been 
small, but those who do attend have had the privil- 
ege of hearing things worth while. 

Our Church School, although small in numbers, 
is a wide awake little school. They are all busy 
trying to make a big collection for Easter'offering. 

Our Woman's Auxiliary meets every week, if 
there is no rain, at the homes of the members. 

We are trying to keep a little spark of Christi- 
anity alive in our Community. Is that not what 
we should try to do? 



ST. MARY'S. KINSTON 



Leon H. Sugg 

HYMAN E. RICE, 50, died of heart trouble 
shortly after mid-night on April 1st. Mr. 
Rice was widely known and highly esteemed. He 
was, for many years, a member of St. Mary's 
Episcopal Church and also a member and secre- 
tary of the Men's Bible Class for a long time and 
was a faithful attendant. 

Hyman Rice will be greatly missed by the Men's 
Bible Class of St. Mary's. Members of his family 
have our deepest sympathy in their great loss. 



Bishop Darst was at St. Mary's on March 23, 
for Confirmation. He Confirmed a class of eight, 
presented by the Rev. Mr. Pearman, and dedicated 
three memorial windows and preached to almost 
an overflow congregation at the 11:00 o'clock ser- 
vice. Good many attended from other parishes 
in the Diocese to be present at the dedication 
services. 

The Bishop told the congregation Dr. Bartholo- 



THE MISSION HERALD 



15 



mew Fuller Huske would come to St. Mary's and 
take up the work as rector of the parish on May 
1st. I think our people are very much delighted 
and many put at ease to know he is really going 
to be our rector. We are looking forward to his 
coming with great pleasure and feeling that we 
are going to have just exactly what we want and 
have been needing for a long time, judging from 
all the good things I have heard about him. I 
trust every member of St. Mary's will give him 
every bit of the cooperation that is in their power 
to assist him in making this work here a glorious 
success. 



The many true friends of the Rev. H. J. Lewis 
were shocked and distressed at his sudden death 
at Marion S. C. He was a fine boy, with many 
fine traits of character. While rector of St. Mary's 
Church, Kinston, he was a real power among the 
young people, especially, and extremely popular 
generally. He did more to build up the Sunday 
School and presented more candidates for Con- 
firmation than any other rector St. Mary's has 
had since I can remember, during his two years 
here as rector. I know he has many friends here 
who are very much grieved over his passing. He 
meant a great deal to me in my own church life; 
socially, he was a real Pal that I thoroughly en- 
joyed. He had a bright future and I do so regret 
it being brought to such a sudden ending. 



WASHINGTON-MARTIN CHURCHES 



Rev. Arthur H, Marshall 

THE Lenten Services of the Washington-Mar- 
tin Counties Group of Churches under the 
Rev. Arthur H. Marshall, are held on Tuesdays 
and Fridays at 4:30 P. M., at the Church of the 
Advent, Williamston, and a Holy Communion Ser- 
vice at Williamston, on Wednesday morning at 
10. Then at Grace Church, Plymouth, on Wed- 
nesday afternoon at 4:30 and also on Wednesday 
night at 7:30. St. Martin's Church, Hamilton, 
Tuesday evening at 7:30 and Roper, Thursday 
evening at 7:30 and Holy Trinity Mission, Will- 
iamston, Friday evening at 7:30 and from three 
to four services each Sunday makes a full week 
but reports from those Churches tell us that 
great interest is being maintained and good con- 
gregations are in evidence at every service. 

St. Martin's Church, Hamilton 

St. Martin's Church was presented with fifty 
of the new Prayer Books and an Altar Service 
Book recently by Mr. T. F. Darden, of Wilmington. 
The Altar Book is a memorial to Mr. Darden's 
mother who was a communicant of St. Martin's 



Church and Mr. Darden keeps his interest in the 
old Church. The thanks of the congregation was 
sent to him for the very nice Memorial and gift 
which are greatly appreciated. 

St. Luke's, Roper 

The ladies of St. Luke's Auxiliary under the 
leadership of Miss Augusta Carstarphen, are very 
busy during Lent and are attending the Services 
as well as working for the General Church by 
serving dinners and banquets to the different 
school societies. Quite a sum of money has come 
in because of the interest and energy of these 
women but they very properly place the emphasis 
upon the Spiritual and as a result the Services 
of the Church are well attended not only by the 
members of the Parish but by many who are in- 
vited to attend by the Parishioners. 

Holy Trinity Mission 

Holy Trinity Mission, Near Williamston, reports 
wonderful congregations from six to eight at the 
Friday evening service as well as at the Sunday 
service and this is remarkable in view of the fact 
that only one family belong to the Church in that 
section and those who come are of the Primitive 
Baptist or Disciple but largely belonging to no 
Church, but the Mission is bearing fruit which is 
shown by the fact that several of the children of 
the public schools, in filling out a questionaire, 
said that they preferred the Episcopal Church 
and would join it when they joined any church. 
The services are made interesting and the people 
are enthusiastic. 

The Church of the Advent, Williamston 

There are services held at this Church during 
each week in addition to the regular Sunday ser- 
vices and the Woman's Auxiliary which are weH 
attended. This Church in conjunction with the 
other Churches of the town made a survey of the 
town recently with every house in town reporting 
and while the results of the survey are not yet 
ready, a great many people who are not members 
of a Church gave their preference and this Church 
will receive its full share of those who will be in- 
vited to both the Church and Sunday School Ser- 
vices. 

Grace Church, Plymouth 

The Woman's Auxiliary of Grace Church is 
holding weekly study classes in addition to attend- 
ing the two midweek Services at the Church 
which are all well attended and a real revival of 
interest and enthusiasm is manifested at every 
Service. We are sorry to lose the services of Mr. 
Frith Winslow as Lay Reader who gave services 
twice a month on Sunday mornings while the 
Rector was at other Churches as Mr Winslow is a 
great influence for good and a great leader both 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



in the Church and also in the Sunday school where 
he is Superintendent. We hope that he will be able 
to give the time to us again in the near future as 
we miss him and appreciate all that he has done 
for the Church by his faithful Ministry of service 
and leadership. 



CHRIST CHURCH, NEW BERN 



Rev. G. H. Madura 

DURING the last two years a Junior Choir 
has developed at Christ Church. It now 
takes its place in the regular organization of the 
Parish. Named for St. Cecilia, patroness of mu- 
sic, it hopes to combine worship with song to the 
glory of God. Vestments have been designed by 
Mrs. Madara, and are now being worn for the first 
time. They consist of a grey Puritan gown, full 
length, with large cape; white cord about the 
waist, white cuffs and cap, and Eton collar. 

The Lenten services have been better attended 
this year than for many years; due, in part, to 
the aid to worship given by the 18 girls who are 
members of this Choir. The faithful work of 
Mrs. Bertha Duffy at the organ has meant much 
to their progress. 

They are singing their first two-part anthem, 
and are greatly thrilled with this evidence of 
their progress. 



ST. THOMAS, BATH 



DEAR Old St. Thomas' Church is opened every 
Friday night for a Lenten service by the 
Rev. Sidney E. Matthews. Not only the members 
of the Church seem to appreciate this blessed 
privilege, but many of other religious bodies show 
their appreciation by regular attendance. 

The untiring effords of Mr. Mathews has 
awakened new life in the parish, which is seen by 
the large congregations at every service. 
May he stay with us. 

(Mrs.) M. E. Price 



PLEDGE $25,000 TO NEW BERN HOSPITAL 



That Amount Will Be Given By Episcopalians of 
Pennsylvania 

New Bern, March 17. — The Episcopal diocese of 
Pennsylvania has pledged $25,000 towards the 
building of the proposed Negro hospital here, 
leaving only §15,000 to be raised by the Eastern 
Carolina diocese or the general Protestant Epis- 
copal Church. Already 8135.000 of the needed 
$150,000 has been secured. 

Other contributions which have been promised 
are $75,000 by the Duke foundation and $35,000 
by the Rosenwald fund. No difficulty is expected 
in procuring the remaining $15,000 and it is hoped 



that work can be started on the structure during 
the summer. Pennsylvania Episcopalians are pre- 
paring a booklet about New Bern to assist them in 
raising the pledged amount during the Lenten 
season. Rev. R. I. Johnson, rector of St. Cyprians' 
colored church, has been appointed chairman of 
the movement by Bishop Thomas C. Darst, of 
Wilmington. 



5: 



Y 

£ Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. 

••• 

.*, Publicity Chairman 

ANNUAL MEETING 



THE annual meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary 
will take place at the same time that the 
Diocesan Convention will meet at St. Paul's 
Church, Wilmington, N. C. There will be a meet- 
ing of the Executive Board at 5:30 on May 13th. 

At 8 :00 o'clock there will be a Quiet Hour Ser- 
vice in preparation for the work of the Conven- 
tion. It is earnestly hoped that every delegate 
and visitor and all the Church women of vicinity 
will be present at this service. 

At the meeting which opens at ten o'clock on 
Wednesday, Mrs. W. J. Loring Clark of Sewanee, 
Tenn., and Mrs. James R. Cain of Columbia, S. C, 
will make addresses. Mrs. Clark will also address 
the Convention on the Work of the Daughters of 
the King. She will speak to the Auxiliary on the 
subject, '"The Young Woman in Relation to the 
Woman's Auxiliary." Mrs. Cain, who is Provin- 
cial President of the Woman's Auxiliary, will 
speak at the noon hour on "The Devotional Life." 
Mrs. Jennie Howard will tell of the work she is 
doing at the East Carolina Training College for 
Women, which is being sponsored by our organi- 
zation. These are a few of the speakers who will 
come with interesting and inspiring messages. 

For several years there has been no Old Gold 
and Silver offering but this year there will be a 
collection. Make the visits in your own parish 
and town and bring in all the old things that can 
be spared for St. Margaret's School at Tokyo. 

It was suggested in the program of the year 
that each society should send a young woman as 
a visitor to the meeting if not as delegate and if 
necessary pay her expenses. 

If you have questions which you want to have 
answered about the work of the Auxiliary or if 
you want certain subjects discussed, write them 
out and give them to the woman in charge of the 
registration desk when you arrive. Time will be 
arranged for discussion. These suggestions will 
also be a guide and help to the officers in the com- 



THE MISSION HERALD 



17 



ing months. 

At 9:00 o'clock on the 15th, there will be de- 
partmental conferences in charge of the Chair- 
man, a conference on the United Thank Offering, 
on the Box Work, etc. Mrs. Adams and Mrs. 
Shelburne will conduct a conference on the Mis- 
sion Work in the Five Fields of Service. This 
will give every one in touch to get in touch with 
any branch of the work in which she is engaged. 

Let us make this meeting a help and a real in- 
spiration to all who attend. Come for the Quiet 
Hour and stay until the meeting is over. 



ADVANCE WORK PROGRAM— 1929-1931 



ADVANCE WORK is new work, not mainten- 
ance. In the Advance Work Program, there 
is provision for new church buildings, parish 
h o u se s , hospitals, student centers, rectories, 
mission buildings, land, equipment, dormitories 
and schools, as well as such miscellaneous neces- 
sities as a water system, a heating plant and a 
motor launch for the use of a missionary Bishop 
and his helpers. 

The present Program is the direct outcome of 
action taken by General Convention of 1928, in 
adopting a specific plan for providing these new 
buildings and equipment. The first step in this 
plan was the appointment of a Committee to se- 
lect from the needs presented by the Bishop of 
the Church and others, the projects most deserv- 
ing and the most needed at this time. 

The Advance Work Program as finally revised 
and approved includes approximately 170 separate 
and definite projects of much-needed work, rang- 
ing from an item of $70,000 for new buildings and 
equipment for St. Luke's Hospital, Shanghai, 
China, down to 8200 for land and outstations 
among the Tirurai, at Upi in the Philippine Is- 
lands. 

The decision was then reached that this Pro- 
gram should be presented to the Church early in 
1930 with an effort to conclude the endeavor dur- 
ing the Epiphany season of 1931. 

There is to be no assignment of quotas to dio- 
ceses, but each diocese is to be requested to under- 
take certain definite projects of the Program, and 
to hold itself responsible for their completion by 
the end of the Epiphany season, 1931. Doubtless 
dioceses, after accepting their groups of projects, 
will ask parishes, missions and individuals to un- 
dertake, in like manner, the completion of definite 
pieces of work within the time designated. Many 
opportunities are offered for memorial gifts by 
parishes or individuals. 

Our National Council, through its Field De- 
partment, will be prepared to submit suggestions 
for promoting the Advance Work Program, as 



well as detailed information concerning each pro- 
ject, in order that the people of the Church may 
be thoroughly informed. Thus the people will be 
able to visualize their accepted projects in terms 
of bricks, mortar, tile, plumbing and the other 
physical constituents making up each complete 
structure. 

The Church has responded, always, to appeals 
for definite things in its missionary enterprise. 
The Advance Work Program affords the opportu- 
nity of supplying actual, tangible equipment — 
tools, — for the promotion of the Church's Mission 
in all the fields in which she is at work. 

The needs are real needs, vitally affecting the 
work. They have the authority of General Con- 
vention behind them. Any of them may be in- 
vestigated by interested persons. They are of- 
fered to the Church as opportunities to Go For- 
ward; opportunities, not onerous tasks. It is 
believed that as dioceses accept their projects, 
this unified effort to advance the world work of 
Christ's Church will result not only in new life 
in the mission field, but in a revival of interest 
and consecration in every parish and mission at 
home. This is Evangelism^ — the will to work for 
the extension of Christ's Kingdom throughout 
the whole world. 



EDUCATIONAL WORK 



THE Educational Work for 1929 made advances 
along some lines as shown by the reports 
for the year. "Following Christ" seems to be 
the most popular book that we have used as it 
was the most widely read. "Roads to the City of 
God" which was selected by the National Educa- 
tional Secretary seemed not very suitable for our 
needs. So we thought it would be well to have 
an alternative, and "Spiritual Adventuring" was 
chosen for this purpose. 

As the season of Lent is here I hope more of us 
will be able to attend and take part in the study 
course. "Christ in the Common Ways of Life" 
by C. S. Woodward has been suggested for our 
use at this time. Miss Boyer has prepared a 
discussion course on this book. Both may be ob- 
tained either from The Daughters of the King, 
room 305, 150 Fifth Avenue, New York, or our 
own book store, 281 Fourth Avenue, New York. 
The price of the book is $1.00 and of the sugges- 
tions, 25 cents. Bible study may be substituted 
by any group who prefers to do so. We do urge 
each branch of the Auxiliary to hold weekly meet- 
ings during Lent and to have some devotional 
work at these meetings. 

As the work of the Church School is closely al- 
lied with this department it seems to me that we 
can be of real service there, particularly in the 



18 



THE MISSION HERALD 



rural fields is our help needed. A real service 
will be to offer one's self as a Church School Teach- 
er or a substitute teacher. To work with the 
pupils of the Church School is one way of spending 
Lent. 



STUDENT WORK AT EAST CAROLINA 
TEACHER COLLEGE 



ELIZABETH CITY MEETING 



THE women of Christ Church Parish, Elizabeth 
City, had a most interesting meeting on 
March 10, in the Parish House. It was a meeting 
well attended, with four Diocesan Officers and 
two Diocesan Chairmen present. 

Mrs. Victor Shelburn of Washington, Pres. of 
the Convocation of Edenton: Mrs. Fred Outland 
of Washington, Chr. Christian Social Service: 
Miss Elizabeth Griffin, of New Bern, Box Sec: 
Mrs. A. H. Worth, of Elizabeth City, Diocesan 
Treasurer, and Mrs. Geo. F. Hill, Publicity Chair- 
man. 

The meeting was opened by the Rector, Rev. 
Geo. F. Hill who welcomed the visitors to the Par- 
ish in a most gracious way. Mrs. C. W. Melick, 
President of the Woman's Auxiliary of Christ 
Church Parish, then introduced each speaker in 
turn and in her always charming manner, welcom- 
ed them on behalf of the women of the Parish. 

Mrs. Shelburn was the first to talk to the 
women. She very clearly and definitely explained 
the objectives of the Women of the Diocese — 
taking up each object and explaining it in detail. 
Her talk was instructive and interesting and 
through it all a high spiritual note was sounded. 

Following this talk, Mrs. Melick asked for a 
free discussion. An informal discussion followed 
with many questions asked and answered. 

Mrs. Outland spoke next, making a strong 
appeal for more Christian Social Service, telling 
of the beauty of the work, the joy of doing and 
stressing the spirit of love and fellowship. She 
urged the daily use of Dean Lathrop's "Medita- 
tions on the Lord's Prayer." 

Miss Elizabeth Griffin, introduced as a pro- 
duct of Christ Church Parish, where she lived 
before going to New Bern, then gave a brief talk 
on the importance of the Box Work. She urged us 
to inform ourselves about the places and people to 
whom we send Boxes, thus creating a keener in- 
terest in the work. 

The girls of the Young People's Service League 
served tea and dainty sandwiches. Expressions 
were heard from all that it had been a real in- 
spiration to be present and to hear the wonder- 
fully helpful messages given. 

Christ Church Parish always welcomes an oc- 
casion to have the Diocesan Officers and it is sin- 
cerely hoped that they will come to us again in the 
near future. 



WITH the beginning of Lent our student group 
at E. C. T. C. decided to carry out a definite 
program during these weeks. First, they had a 
sincere desire to understand more fully the true 
meaning of this season of the Christian Year. 
That the effort has been shown by an increase in 
the Bible Class attendance and the spirit of self 
denial. Secondly, the Life of Christ was selected 
as the subject of their Lenten study. 

Thirdly, they decided to contribute to the fund 
being raised among students for the purpose of 
helping Chinese students at St. John's Medical 
School. Shanghai, China. 



The members of the Student Group wishes to 
thank the Diocese of East Carolina for its loving 
interest in them as shown by the splendid gift 
made to them at the last meeting of the Executive 
Council. This gift will take the form of a Student 
Center in Greenville, in St. Paul's Parish House 
soon to be erected. It is with hearts full of love 
and appreciation that we thank Bishop Darst, Mrs. 
McMillan and Rev. W. A. Lillycrop and the other 
members of the Council who formulated the plans 
that made a Student Center possible at E. C. T. C. 



Miss Betty Uzzell graduated at the end of the 
last term. She served as Secretary of the Bible 
Class and was also a faithful member of the Club. 
She leaves in the near future for Bonita Springs, 
Fla., where she will join her family who have 
recentlv moved there. We all miss Betty. 



We give a loving welcome to all the new girls 
who entered E. C. T. C. at the beginning of this 
new term. A place is waiting in our group for 
each one of them and we want them to share in 
all our activities. 



^ftt jHemarhtm 



WALTER WOOTEN DAWSON, M. D. 



In the death of Dr. W. W. Dawson, our com- 
munity has lost a skilled and kind Physician and 
Surgeon; our Church, a devoted member and Ves- 
tryman; our County, a valuable officer and our 
State a splendid and patriotic citizen. Born and 
raised here almost within the shadow of Old St. 
John's Church, he was brought up under her in- 
fluence and trained in her service. He loved her 
much and did all he could to promote her welfare. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



19 



A born leader, he did much to further the in- 
terest of his County and section, in fact, the af- 
fairs of the whole State. By unusual ability, 
thrift and good management, he acquired a goodly 
fortune and failed not to share it with others less 
fortunate. Had he lived, he bid fair to become a 
master financier and a great philanthropist. Peace 
to his ashes and may all his good deeds be long 
remembered. 

We suggest that this slight token of our high 



regard and sincere admiration be placed on our 
Churck Record, published in the Mission Herald 
and a copy, with our warmest love and tenderest 
sympathy, be sent to his bereaved family. 
Signed : 

DR. WM. COBB WHITFIELD, Chmn. 

W. C. MEWBORN, 

W. J. H. LAUGHINGHOUSE, 

0. W. MAY, 

S. G. BARRINGTON. 



FINANCI AL STA TEMENT 

Statement of Amounts Paid on Apportionments for the Church's Program — Diocesan 

and General to April 1st, 1930 

Resolution of Executive Council at January, 1930, Meeting 

"On motion of the Chairman of the Committee on Apportionment and Appropriations, it was 
decided to accept for this year the 1929 apportionments, with the understanding that the matter 
will be given further consideration at the Annual Convention." 



FIRST 

Location Parish Apportionment 

Edenton, St. Paul's $ 3,000.00 

Wilmington. St. James' 13,380.00 

Woodville, Grace Church 500.00 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 100.00 

Winterville, St. Luke's 200.00 

SECOND 

Creswell, St. David's 700.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 2,415.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 4,300.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 1,500.00 

Greenville. St. Paul's 2,100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1,000.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 2,500.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 4,000.00 

Plymouth. Grace Church 400.00 

Washington St. Peter's 4,500.00 

Wilmington St. John's -... 3,000.00 

Wilmington St. Paul's 1,995.00 

Windsor. St Thomas' _ 600.00 

THIRD 

Ayden, St. James' 320.00 

Beaufort,. St. Paul's _ 600.00 

Belhaven, St. James' - 500.00 

Bonnerlon, St. John's _ 100.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's 400.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 200.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 100.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 350.00 

Southport, St. Philip's 250.00 

Williamston, Advent 300.00 

Winton, St. John's 200.00 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 300.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 530.00 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 125.00 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 200.00 

Warsaw, Calvary 80.00 

Whiteville, Grace Church 90.00 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 100.00 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 100.00 

Morehead City, St. Andrew*! 70.00 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 60.00 



FOURTH 



Atkinson, St. Thomas' 

Aurora, Holy Cross 

Bath. St. Thomas' 

Chocowinity, Trinity 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's .... 

Grifton, St. John's 

Hope Mills, Christ Church .. 

Jessama, Zion _ 

Lake Landing, St. George's 



100.00 
500.00 
100.00 
100.00 
200.00 
250.00 
150.00 
125.00 
125.00 



Paid by Paid by 
Parish Ch. School 

$ 817.30 $ 

1,814.24 



16.75 
60.00 



176.05 
375.00 



495.00 
412.65 



49.05 

49.60 

8.00 



53.65 
16.70 



41.68 
25.00 



25.00 
5.00 



16.88 
43.70 



New Bern, St. Cyprian's 

Red Spring's, St. Stephen's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' .... 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 

Wilmingtoi, St. Mark's . 

Belhaven, St. Mary's — 

Edenton, St. John-Evangelist 

Edward, Redeemer 

Elizabeth City, St. Philips' 

Fairfield, All Saint's 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Lumberton, Trinity ._ 

Maxton, St. Matthew's 

North West, All Souls' 

Sladesville, St. John's 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Washington, St. Paul's 

WrightsviUe, St. Andrew's 

Aurora, St. Jude's 

Beaufort, St. Clement's — 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's __ 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Kinston, Christ Church 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 

Oriental, St. Thomas' - 

Pikeville, Mission -.. 

PoIIocksville, Mission — 

Robersonville, Mission 

Roper, St. Ann's .... 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 

Campbelton, St. Phillip's 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn"', Mission 
Wrightsville. St. Augustine's 



400.00 

100.00 

240.00 

60.00 

300.00 

200.00 

105.00 

150.00 

25.00 

25.00 

20.00 

50.00 

50.00 

100.00 

26.00 

50.00 

30.00 

75.00 

125.00 

160.00 

100.00 

60.00 

40.00 

100.00 

60.00 

50.00 

76.00 

60.00 

10.00 

50.00 

48.00 

25.00 

25.00 

45.00 

100.00 

65.00 

30.00 

15.80 

20.00 



69.91 
15.00 



23.62 



25.00 



20.00 



10.00 
16.70 



31.50 



8.00 



2.00 
5.00 
5.00 



$56,033.00 $.4,747.8 



Please note that only 32 of the 87 Parishes and 
Missions have remitted this year. The Diocese 
needs the support of all the people each month. 
It is hoped that each Parish and Mission will make 
a special effort to carry out the following resolu- 
tion of the Executive Council: "That all Parishes 
and Missions be requested to remit MONTHLY 
to the Treasurer of the Diocdse, the funds receiv- 
ed for Diocesan and General Church purposes." 



20 



THE MISSION HERALD 



JL^ •—•—***♦*—•**•*.•****-**-*••*******«*♦•**♦*♦**••*•♦*••*•»*♦+**♦****«*•-•**-•*♦ AW*M*M*^uVAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 



S 



Virginia 
Episcopal School 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 



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Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
lege and University. Modern 
equipment. Healthy location in 
the mountains of Virginia. Cost 
moderate, made possible through 
generosity of founders. For cat- 
alogue apply to 

Rev. Wm. G. Pendleton, 
D. D., Rector 



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Church Furnishings 

Gold, Silver and Brass 

II Church and Chancel 
Furniture 

Write for Catalogue for 
Episcopal Churches. 

W. & E. Schmidt Co. 

308 Third Street 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 






SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 
AND JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter receive her 
education in a church sehool. 

Rev. Warren W. Way, A.M., D.D., Rector 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 years' college 
work all fully accredited by the Southen Association. Also 
Courses in Music, Art, Expression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. Indoor 
Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback Riding. 

For Catalogue and View Book address 
A. W. Tucker, Business Manager 





Altars,Pulpits,Lecterns,Font$,Fabrics,Embroideries 

Memorial Table ts, Stained Gla ss Windows.JJ 



56 WEST 8TH ST. NEW YORK. 



THE 

Bank of Edenton 

SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 



f 



Bank With Us By Mail 

JULIAN WOOD, President. 
W. O. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 

j^»x~»:~x-x-x-XtX-x~x~x*«: 
x~XK~XK~x~x~x~XK~x~x~x~:~i 
CHURCH VESTMENTS 

Cassocks. Surplices, Stoles 

Embroideries, Clerical Suits, 
Silks, Cloths, Fringes 

HATS, RABATS, COLLARS 

Cox Sons & Vining 

131-133 East 23rd Street 
New York 




NORFOLK-SOUTHERN 

Passenger Schedules 
Effective December 29, 1929, via Norfolk 
Southern Railroad, Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Lv. 12:15 P. M.— Raleigh, New Bern, Golds- 
boro, Beaufort and inter- 
mediate points. 

-Raleigh, New Bern, Golds- 
boro, Beaufort, Charlotte. 
Fayetteville and intermed- 
iate points. Sleeper to Ra- 
leigh and New Bern. 



Lv. 10:25 P. M.- 



Lv. 5:50 A. M. 



Norfolk and intermediate 
points. 

Lv. 2:50 P. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Connections North 
and West, 
nformation, reservations, etc. 



For further 
apply to 



USE THE 

Mcpherson bus lines 

Between Norfolk, South Mills, Moyock, Elizabeth City, Hertford, 
Edenton, Windsor, Williamston and Washington, N. C. 

TWO ROUND TRIPS DAILY 

For information call 837, or write 
18 N. MARTIN ST., ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. 



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VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV 



For all kinds of pipe organ work Write 

C. E. GRANT 

28 Washington Street, Portsmouth, Va. 

Twenty-seven years experience in Church organ 
building 



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»*^*.**^'..****»«*^*******«**^*^****^*^ 



J. H. TUCKER, Ticket Agt. 
Elizabeth City, N. 



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IS PRINTED BY THE 

Franklin Print Shop 

PARTICULAR 

JLRINTERS 

Colonial Avenue Elizabeth City, N. C. 

juyuhAAAAAJUL*iAAAAAAAA AAA A ( »i/tA»V«*t«*« AA AAA AAAAAA AAA /.A«* 



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Library U. of N. C. , 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Jan. '29 






VOL. XLIV 






No. 5 




ark 



isston 

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TLrt^ira^fl)farrt()$ay'CDmf-lRm22:i7 




QPontJcntt an 
dumber 

Mav, 1930 




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2 THE MISSION HERALD^ 

MAY INDEX ->*»«<»>«H~>.XK"M«<»x->«w.>.!-w»^>'X»^W";»^X"» 

Page •{• $ 

Bishop's Convention -Address : & 3 ? TT? lU^TTTTD T1^ 9( S. 

Report Special Committee 5 jf 1P^ IP 11 \V\ \ ]) Q 

Resolution of Thanks 5 % $ 

New Method of Apportionment 6 I Wilmington's Largest and 

Editorials 8 £ J 

Advance Work' of church 8 | Finest Department Store ! 

Faith and Prayer 9 f t 

In Japan _„ 9 Y y 

Delegates to Synod _ 10 | I>H0NE 2580 X 

Executive Council Members . 10 w W) , vw w»ww»w»w^ wk&w • w >mmJ 

Colored Hospital Committee 10 

„. T , , nr] , ■^hC^XKK^XKKKKK^XKKKK^XK^X^XK^X^K^XK'^KK* 

E 25t Ki:= ton ::::::::-:::::::!: I zo^le^^studio | 

Good Shepherd, Wilmington ____. 10 y Photographs anythine. anywhere, anytime, day or night. A 

St. George's Lake Landing 11 •!• j tt v v *j [' pm tit r«- oi *!♦ 

. A . . /A Send Us Your Kodak Films — We Give 24 .». 

An Appreciation ..11 | Hours Service | 

In Memoriam 12 «mm»>^ m x~xkkk~xkkkk~X"X~x-x~xkkk^^ 

Christ School, Arden 12 

Report on Social Service ._.>. 15 | j& ^511 j^W 

Conference Center of the Episcopal Church H lififl "6 /I lnttL^tfH ^ 

Will open its third season Barjl llJl f fcP*tng«fl 8'?6ijS 

\ oung People's Service League Group (age 1 1 and up) '.'.., T^^^^Fl .. . . ."'* 

June 14-27. 820.00, plus 81.00 registration. 

Adult Groups (Clergy, Church School Workers and ♦^~X~XK"XK~X~X~XK"XKKK~X~X~XKKKKKK~X~X~> 

Woman's Auxiliary) June 28-July 11. 821.00, plus §1.00 X tt IJITRIT Kr RRO^l *:* 

registration. X ' ' X 

Special Woman's Auxiliary Day, July 2. % Goldsboro, N. C. £ 

' X X 

Special Clergy and Lay Conferences on Evangelism, ,% ,t» 

Field Department, July 3-6, $5.00, plus 81.00 registration. £ Specialists in apparel for Men, Women and Children .*. 

Junior Groups (age 12-14) July 12-25, S15.00, plus X~X"X«*XKKK-<K"XK«*X^KKK~X~XKK"X«*'X~X~X«:* 

SI. 00 registration. 

<^KKKKKKKKK"X~X~X"XK"X"X«X»*X«X"X»»X« < X"X"X« 

I< rom July 25. the property will be operated on the a a 

guest basis, 'under Church auspices. % \ty\ B. THORPE & CO. X 

The property includes a hotel, four annexes and thirty- X Wilmington, N. C. X 

nine cottages All rooms are well furnished. Electric | Q j j Building . Material 

lights and hot and cold water throughout. •{♦ /r* * 

«|> CALL ON US •:» 

Boating and Swimming on 18 acre lake. <♦ 4? 

„ ,.-,,. , , -i o i i- , . tt 4«>*4^^^<^"X«<^^«X~XKKKK~X~X»»X»»X~X»*X~X~X^X« 

Beautiful drives and hikes. Splendid roads. Horse- 
back riding during guest period. Tennis. Golf. W»>#^»>M<<^<^^^»HH»W H » » »»H»»» 

Kanuga is .situated six miles from Hendersonville and $ When in Elizabeth City, N. C. & 

thirty miles from Asheville. j« CALL ON % 

Board, 8200 a Uy; 81200 a week | pj rst an( | Citizens National Bank I 

Children under twelve years, 81.50 a day; S8.00 a week. j. Thfiy wU , be glad to serye you | 

Lodging in hot: 1 and annexes 81.00 and 81.25 a day; Y RESOURCES OVER FOUR MILLION DOLLARS J 

85.00 and 87.00 a week. tc~X^X^XX^X^X~X-X-X^X~X^X-X-.X~X~X-t 

Two in a room, 80.75 a day ; S4.00 a week each. Cottages 

815.00 to 835.00 a week, according to number of rooms. *<m>^>*<mX~X~X~XK"XK~X~XK"X~X~XKK~X~X~X«X* 

Nurses and maids, $1 .50 a day. All meals served in y y 

hote j V We take pleasure in selling Book*. L«t at quot« v 

For further information apply to X y° u on y° ur need » or wish « g - 

RT. REV. K. G. FINLAY | p. W. MELICK Co. 

Trinity Parish House, Columbia, S. C, to June 7th. After * Elizabeth citt. n. c. X 

that date, Kanuga Lake, Hendersonville, N. C. ♦<X^"><^~X^~X«'X^^~:"X^X*<~X~XK*-X~X~X~X~X*'X~> 



The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, MAY, 1930 



No. 5 



Bishop's Address - 1930 



Brethren of the Clergy and Laity of the Diocese 
of East Carolina: 

"Grace be unto you, and peace from God, our 
Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ." 

I welcome you to the Forty-seventh Annual 
Convention of our Diocese, and I pray that the 
blessing of God may rest upon us, and that the 
Holy Spirit may guide us in all our deliberations. 

Since our last Convention, nine Bishops of the 
Church have entered into the Larger Life. 

May we stand in reverent tribute as I read their 
names: 

Rt. Rev. John Gardner Murray, Bishop of Mary- 
land, Presiding Bishop; Rt. Rev. Theodore N. 
Morrison, Bishop of Iowa; Rt. Rev. Davis Ses- 
sums, Bishop of Louisiana; Rt. Rev. Beverly D. 
Tucker, Bishop of Southern Virginia; Rt. Rev. 
Lucien Lee Kinsolving, retired Bishop of Brazil; 
Rt. Rev. Charles P. Anderson, Bishop of Chicago. 
Presiding Bishop; Rt. Rev. Arthur C. A. Hall, 
Bishop of Vermont; Rt. Rev. Charles L. Slattery, 
Bishop of Massachusetts ; Rt. Rev. Herbert Ship- 
man, Suffragan Bishop of New York. 

"May they rest in peace, and may light per- 
petual shine upon them." 

"Remember thy servants, Lord, according to 
the favour which Thou bearest unto Thy people, 
and grant that increasing in knowledge and love 
of Thee, they may go from strength to strength. 
in the life of perfect service, in Thy Heavenly 
Kingdom, through Jesus Christ our Lord, Who 
liveth and reigneth with Thee and the Holy Ghost 
ever, One God, would without end." AMEN. 



On the Feast of the Epiphany, January sixth, 
in the year of our Lord, Nineteen Hundred and 
thirty, I celebrated the fifteenth anniversary of 
my Consecration as Bishop of East Carolina, and 
while it is not my purpose to even attempt to 
give a resume of the busy, happy years in which 
I have been permitted to serve you, the following 
information may be of some value. 

Since my Consecration as Bishop, I have con- 
firmed 5542 persons, received forty-four Postu- 
lants, admitted thirty-seven Candidates for Holy 
Orders, Ordained thirty-three men to the Diacon- 
ate, and thirty-two to the Priesthood. 

To some this information may be nothing more 



than a list of figures, but to me it represents 
high spiritual privilege, and it is with profound 
gratitude to God that I recall the solemn joy that 
was mine as I laid my hands upon the heads of 
each one of these thousands who came forward 
for Confirmation, or as 1, in the name of Christ 
and His Church, commissioned those eager sol- 
diers of the Cross and sent them out to administer 
His Sacraments and preach His Gospel. 

I will not, in this address, attempt to tell of the 
progress and development of the Diocese during 
the past fifteen years. God has blessed our labors. 
We have been able to accomplish something. We 
have been able to maintain our standards of Mis- 
sionary interest year after year, but I am sure 
that we are all conscious of our failure to reach 
our ideals, and of the absolute necessity for great- 
er zeal and loyalty and devotion if we are to bring 
our poor strivings into line with our glorious 
opportunities. 

For your patience and sympathy and gracious 
kindness from the first day until now, I desire to 
thank you with all my heart. You have over- 
looked my many mistakes, you have magnified 
my little achievements, you have made such suc- 
cess as has come to us possible by your cooper- 
ation, and you have made me humbly proud to 
be the leader of such a people. 



In reporting on the work of the Diocese during 
the past year, I mention first, as is my usual 
custom, 

The Negro Work 

In many respects the past year was hopeful 
and encouraging, with many signs of renewed 
life and genuine progress. 

Of the six thousand Communicants in the Dio- 
cese, eight hundred are colored, or about one- 
seventh of the total number, and it is interesting 
to note that one-fourth of all Confirmed last year 
were presented by our Colored Clergy. 

With practically no exceptions, the Colored 
Parishes and Missions paid their apportionments 
to the Diocese and National Church in full, and in 
many other ways proved their loving interest in 
the Program of the Church. 

The outstanding event in connection with the 
Negro work was the successful launching of a 



THE MISSION HERALD 



plan to build an adequate and greatly needed Hos- 
pital for the Colored people of East Carolina. 
This plan, so vigorously fostered by the Rev. 
Robert I. Johnson, Rector of St. Cyprian's Church, 
New Bern, has won the approval and generous 
support of those in charge of the Duke Founda- 
tion and of the Rosenwald Fund, and as concrete 
evidence of this interest, we have been promised 
a gift of seventy-five thousand dollars from the 
Rosenwald Fund, contingent upon a total amount 
of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars being 
raised. We are happy to report that the Diocese 
of Pennsylvania has accepted twenty-five thous- 
and dollars of this additional amount as a part of 
its Advance Work, leaving but fifteen thousand 
dollars to be raised in order to erect and equip 
the building. I commend this worthy cause to 
the generous and sympathetic support of our 
people. 



In turning from this particular department of 
our Diocesan life to 

The Diocese as a Whole 

We ha\ e many reasons to feel encouraged, and 
yet iron' the standpoint of material prosperity, 
it has been the most depressing year of my Epis- 
copate. All of our people have felt the pinch of 
tV's financial depression, and many of them have 
suffered actual poverty. Many of our rural people 
have faced the calamity that came from the fail- 
ure of crops for one, two, and sometimes three 
years in succession. Banks have failed, bringing 
disaster to the depositors and financial ruin to 
faithful officials who lost their all -in vain efforts 
to save their customers. In addition to this seri- 
ous situation, there has been the inevitable psy- 
chological depression that always accompanies 
genuine depression. Fully conscious of this situ- 
ation. I wondered at times if we could weather 
the storm, and perhaps my courage and faith were 
just a little weak as I compared our task with our 
seeming lack of resources. 

Thanks, however, to the tireless energy and 
unconquerable faith of our undismayed Executive 
Secretary, Rev. Walter R. Noe, the cooperation of 
the Clergy, and, above all, the sacrificial devotion 
of our people, defeat was turned into victory, and 
a possible ten thousand dollar deficit was changed 
into a deficit of not more than fifteen hundred dol- 
lars for the year 1929. 

Naturally, this result was not obtained without 
sacrifice of work that needed to be done, vacancies 
that should have been filled were not filled, and 
opportunities for Advance Work had to be neg- 
lected. 

We held our own, but at considerable cost, and 
it is my earnest hope that, having weathered the 
storm, we may be able to equip the Diocese for 



more efficient service and go forward to greater- 
usefulness. 

Notwithstanding, or perhaps because of, the 
financial depression that characterized the life of 
the Diocese during the past year, the spiritual 
activities of the Parishes and Missions were never 
finer or more wholesome. In the number of Con- 
firmations, we were able to maintain our good re- 
cord of the previous year, in spite of the fact that 
several Missions were vacant. 

The activities of our Laymen in Wilmington 
and in other places have been constructive and 
helpful. The Brotherhood of St. Andrew, under 
the enthusiastic leadership of our National Coun- 
cil member, Mr. John Q. Beckwith, has been re- 
vived, and we now have the proud distinction of 
having a live Chapter of the Brotherhood in every 
Parish of the Diocese. 

On yesterday, we organized a Diocesan Assem- 
bly of the Brotherhood with Mr. Champion McD. 
Davis as President, and we have every reason to 
feel that this spiritual organization will contribute 
much toward the development of the latent powers 
of the laymen of East Carolina. 

During the past year, the Church Army Van 
has been in constant use, and under the direction, 
first of Captain Hurworth, and later of Captain 
Turner, has gone to many places where the Gospel 
of Christ has been truly preached and truly lived 
by those radiant young laymen of the Church 
Army who had been assigned to this Diocese. 

Another important event since the last meeting 
of the Convention was the acquisition of a valu- 
able piece of property on the Pamlico River, near 
Washington, for a Summer Conference and Train- 
ing Center. ' Thanks to the generous kindness of 
the original owners of the property, and the unsel- 
fish action of the Executive Committee in charge 
of Camp I -each, this well equipped and attrac- 
tively locate i property, valued at seven or eight 
thousand dollars, has been turned ever to the 
Diocese for the nominal sum of fourteen hundred 
dollars. It Mill fill a long felt need in our Diocesan 
life, and I commend it to the sympathetic interest 
and active cooperation of our Clergy and Laity. 



The Diocese will gladly cooperate in the Advance 
Work Program of the National Church, and has 
already accepted an item of three thousand dollars 
for the erection of a home for native workers in 
Nanking, China. In addition to this item, St. 
James' Parish, Wilmington, with characteristic 
generosity, has accepted an item of ten thousand 
dollars for the erection of a dormitory at the 
Vorhees School for Colored Youth, Denmark, S. 
Carolina. 

The Woman's Auxiliary of the Diocese, which 
has had an unusually helpful year, and which con- 



THE MISSION HERALD 



tinues to be a source of power and inspiration, 
has generously agreed to raise seven hundred 
dollars toward the Nanking project as its share 
pf the Advance Work Program. 



Report of Special Committee on the 15th Anni- 
versary of the Consecration of 
Bishop Darst 



The Executive Council has functioned efficiently 
during the past year, and, through its Depart- 
ments, has kept in sympathetic and helpful touch 
with every phase of our Diocesan life. 

The rural Clergy have faced a difficult situation 
with courage and self denial, and have emphasiz- 
ed anew the wisdom of placing strong consecrated 
men in our rural fields. 

In this connection, it is interesting to note that 
of the three hundred and thirty four persons 
Confirmed in 1929, two hundred and eight of that 
number were presented by the Missionary Clergy. 



Through the thoughtful kindness and loyal co- 
operation of the members of the Girls' Friendly 
Society in the Diocese of East Carolina, the in- 
surance money on the burned Holiday House has 
been turned over to the Trustees of the Diocese 
to be used in the erection of a Student Center in 
Greenville. 

This Center will constitute a unit of the new 
Parish House of St. Paul's, Greenville, but will 
be devoted to the exclusive use of the students of 
the East Carolina Training College. 

You will be called upon to discuss matters of 
great importance to the future life of our beloved 
Diocese during the meeting of this Convention, 
and it is hardly necessary for me to urge you to 
give your serious consideration to these matters. 
We are not satisfied with "hold our own", but 
must plan to go forward to greater achievements. 
Looking back over the past fifteen years, I thank 
God ; looking forward to the years that lie ahead, 
I take courage ; for, knowing your loyalty and de- 
votion during those years of our fellowship, I am 
confident that you will go forward, looking upon 
each barrier as a challenge to service, and re- 
garding each stumbling block as a new stepping 
stone upward and onward toward the fulfillment 
of God's plans for us, and through us, for the 
world. 

In conclusion, may I say that I desire to conse- 
crate myself anew today to the service to which 
you called me fifteen years ago, and to pledge 
myself once more to the high and holy task com- 
mitted to our hands. 

I love to feel that you are mine, and I know- 
that I am yours. 

In this spirit of loving fellowship with each 
other and with our Master, Christ, we will go 
forward from this mile stone to more sacrificial 
devotion to God and His Church, to a more per- 
fect surrender of our lives to His blessed will. 



ON January 6, 1915, the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. 
Darst was consecrated Bishop of the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina. 

On January 6th, 1930, occurred the 15th Anni- 
versary of the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D. 

When Bishop Darst came to the Diocese of 
East Carolina as its Diocesan, we were living in 
another age that has since passed away. A trans- 
formation has taken place all over East Carolina. 
Bishop Darst, the bishop of an obscure, small, 
rural diocese, has become a national figure in the 
Church. His diocese is known everywhere. Some 
of the greatest movements in the Church during 
the past fifteen years had their beginnings in 
his diocese under his leadership. Not only has 
the Bishop become a national figure in the Church, 
but he is known and loved by his own people in 
the diocese and by the people of other religious 
communions, not only in the Diocese, but through- 
out the State. Under his leadership he has kept 
his diocese in the forefront of all the construct- 
ive movements which the whole Church has a- 
dopted. Words could not adequately express the 
love and appreciation which the people of the 
diocese of East Carolina have for him. 

Be it resolved, therefore: That this Forty- 
Seventh Annual Convention of the Diocese of East 
Carolina go on record as expressing the love, es- 
teem and devotion that the people of the whole 
diocese have for our beloved Bishop who has been 
our overseer for these fifteen years. And let us 
ask God's blessing on the remaining years that 
in His wise providence He permits us to have him 
for our leader. 

Be it further resolved: That this resolution 
occupy the space of a page in the next diocesan 
Journal. 



RESOLUTION OF THANKS 



"Resolved, That we, the delegates of the Forty- 
seventh Annual Convention of the Diocese of East 
Carolina, here assembled, do hereby extend our 
very sincere thanks to the Rev. Alexander Miller, 
Rector, the Vestry and to the congregation of St. 
Paul's Parish, as well as to the clergy and the 
members of the other Churches of Wilmington 
for the very gracious hospitality which has made 
our stay in their city such a delightful one. We 
wish also to thank the newspapers of Wilmington 
for the courtesies shown our Convention. In every 
way it has been a happy privilege to hold this 
Convention in your lovely City." 



THE MISSION HERALD 



New Method of Apportion- 

meant Adopted by Dio= 

eesae Coevenntloe 



PROPOSED BUDGET— 1930 

General Church Quota S 13,000.00 

Salary for Bishop ..._._ 6.000.00 

Pension Premium, for Bishop 200.00 

Salaries of Missionary Clergy 27,097.12 

Pension — Missionary Clergy 1,700.00 

Office Expense — Bishop 275.00 

Travel Expense — Bishop 450.00 

Maintenance Bishop's House 400.00 

Salary of Treasurer 500.00 

Printing and Postage 275.00 

Salary Secretary Annual Convention 250.00 

Expenses of Annual Convention 375.00 

Printing Journal 450.00 

Expenses — Committees 250.00 

Maintenance — Diocesan Office 450.00 

Travel Expense — Executive Secretary 300.00 

Insurance 500.00 

Provincal Synod Assessment . 433.00 

General Convention Assessment 200.00 

Interest 250.00 

S.lary of Executive Secretary 3,000.00 

Salary of Office Secretary ,_ 1,500.00 

Auditing Books and Bond _. 50.00 

Mission Herald 600.00 

Student Secretary, N. C. C. W. 80.00 

Deficit— 1929 1,000.00 

Repairs to Bishop's House and int. - 1,500.00 

Total ...|.61,085.12 



ADVANCE WORK— 1930 

Convocation of Edenton — Appropria- 
tion supplementary to present ap- 
propriation f o r additional service 
and equipment of field .$ 1,200.00 

Salary for teacher, St. John's Paro- 
chial School. Edenton, N. C. 225.00 

Additional salary — teacher "Brooklyn" 

Mission 120.00 

Total 8 1,545.00 

Grand total $ 62,630.12 

EXPECTATIONS— 1930 

Apportionments of Parishes and Mis- 
sions now in force . S 50,303.00 

Special and interest..-. 4,000.00 

Appropriation — General Church 5,700.00 

Lapsed Balances 2,000.00 



Total 



862,003.00 



APPORTIONMENTS NEEDED FOR 1930 
BUDGET REQUIREMENTS 



< I 

* Atkinson, St. Thomas' $ 100.00 

§Ayden, St. James' 320.00 

- Aurora, Holy Cross .. 500.00 

Bath. St. Thomas' 100.00 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 600.00 

Belhaven, St. James 500.00 

Bonnerton, St. John's _ 100.00 

Chocowinity, Trinity 100.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's 400.00 

Creswell. St. David's 700.00 

Edenton, St. Paul's . 2,500.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church ... 2,000.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 400.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's ...... 3,300.00 

§Fayetteville, St. Joseph's . 200.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 200.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's ... 1,200.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's 1,500.00 

§Grifton, St. John's .... 250.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 100.00 
Hertford, Holy Trinity ...... 1,000.00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 150.00 

Jessama, Zion 125,00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 1,800.00 

§Lake Landing, St. George's 125.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 3,000.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 400.00 

Plymouth, Grace Church 400.00 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's... 100.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 350.00 

§Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 240.00 

Southport, St. Philip's . 250.00 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's 50.00 

Washington, St.. Peter's 3,500.00 

Williamston, Advent 300.00 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 300.00 
Wilmington, St. James' 13,380.00 

Wilmington. St. John's 3,000.00 

§Wilmington, St. Mark's 200.00 

Wilmington, St. Paul's . 2,000.00 

Windsor, St. Thomas' . 600.00 

§Winton. St. John's 200.00 

Woodville, Grace Church 500.00 

ORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Ahoskie, Mission 

Belhayen, St. Mary's 105.00 

Burgaw, St. Mary's 100.00 

Columbia, St. Andrew's 300.00 

Edenton, St. John-Evangelist . 150.00 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 25.00 

Fairfield, All Saints' . 20.00 



FOR 



cS ^ S 



£u g. 



82 
50 
91 
52 

100 
46 
65 
95 

100 
74 
45 
62 
68 
9 
41 
48 
54 
55 
27 
64 
86 
71 
62 
27 
50 
39 
77 
48 

100 
81 
91 
29 
68 
96 
13 
95 
62 
9 
44 
71 
62 

100 



91 
100 
100 
55 
39 
20 



T HE MISSION HERALD _J_ 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 50.00 31 reported current expenses and the apportion- 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's _„. 100.00 55 ments. 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 50.00 32 3. All Parishes and Missions whose apportion- 

Lumberton, Trinity 100.00 27 ments are above the normal basis increase their 

§Maxton, St. Matthew's .. 25.00 23 apportionments a like percentage as the reported 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's 70.00 21 increase in current expenses over the previous 

♦North West, All Souls' 50.00 — year indicates. 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 10.00 100 4. All Parishes and Missions whose apportion- 

Pikeville, St. George's 50.00 15 ments are below the normal basis but more than 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 125.00 59 50% of their reported current expenses increase 

*Sladesville, St. John's 30.00 — their apportionment each year 5% until the nor- 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 200.00 50 mal basis is reached. 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 75.00 87 5. All Parishes and Missions whose apportion- 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 60.00 50 ments are below the normal basis but less than 

Trenton, Grace Church 125.00 90 50% of their reported current expenses increase 

Warsaw, Calvary 40.00 23 their apportionments each year 10 % until the 

Washington, St. Paul's 150.00 100 normal basis is reached. 

gWhiteville, Grace Church 90.00 54 THE AD VANTAGES OF THE NEW METHOD 

§Winterville, St. Luke's 200.00 100 L The apportionmen t is based not upon the 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 100.00 46 number of communicants but upon the ability to 

lYeatesville, St. Matthew's 100.00 47 payj ag indicated in the amount spent for current 

UNORGANIZED MISSIONS expenses. 

Aurora, St. Jude's 50.00 100 2 - Tne Present arrangement of the Parishes 

Avoca, Holv Innocents' 100.00 100 and Missions of the Diocese as presented shows 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 40.00 100 where effort is needed and where effort must be 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 50.00 50 made if the Diocese is to go forward. 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 65.00 100 3 - The p arish or Mission which has reached 

* Jasper St Thomas' 50 00 a mgn standard of giving has the assurance that 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 5o'oO 40 a wa - v is Provided for those who have not reached 

Pollocksville, Mission 48.00 100 such a standard to do so. 

*Robersonville, Mission . 25.00 — 4 - If for £ ood reasons a Parish or Mission 

Roper St Ann's 25 00 100 mus t reduce its apportionment this method pro- 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' Z 30*00 29 vides that jt immediately make the effort to ad- 

*Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Mission 15.00 — vance without undue strain or hardship. 

^Wrightsville, St. Augustine's .... 20.00 — 5 - !t is not a question of "How-Much"— it is 

a question of "As Much." 

PAROCHIAL MISSIONS 6. Credit is given where credit is due and re- 

Campbellton, St. Philip's 100.00 100 sponsibility is placed where is belongs. 

*Kinston, Christ Church 50.00 — 7. This method provides for GROWTH— it 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 45.00 13 shows the way — step by step. 

A splendid start has been made. Representative 

Total .. 850,303.00 Parishes and Missions already occupy enviable 

* No current expenses reported. positions in the new arrangement. IT CAN BE 
§ Current expenses from 1928 report. DONE. 

-§These parishes became self-sustaining a few FQR INFORMATION 

years ago and were g 1V en small apportionments. ^ ^ gtatement .^ ^ parighes and 

FOR 1930 Missions of the Diocese accept as their goal an 

The Parishes and Missions of the Diocese ac- apportionment equal to 100% of their reported 

cept as a minimum of responsibility for 1930, (a) current expenses" is a necessary one if the Dio- 

the Budget, (b) the apportionments presented cese continues its present work, and makes some 

herewith. provision for the growth in the years to come. 

On the basis of the reported current expenses 

FOR THE FUTURE of the Parishes and Missions of the Diocese the 

1. The Parishes and Missions of the Diocese normal basis for every Parish and Mission pay- 
accept as their goal an apportionment equal to 100 i n g its share of the Budget is approximately 
per cent, of their reported Current Expenses. 70% of its reported current expenses. 

2. A normal basis be determined by using the (Continued on page 9) 



THE MISSION HERALD 



<$k* M 



tsstmt 



teral£> 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



Subscription SI. 00 a Year. Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal. resolutions, one cent pei word. 



Enterci as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. 



THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS 

IT is hoped that every member of the Church in 
the Diocese will read carefully the Bishop's 
Address to the recent Convention, beginning on 
page 3. The Bishop sees the Diocese as a whole, 
whereas most of us see but the work of a single 
parish or mission. 



OUR BISHOP 

IT was a joy to every delegate attending the 
recent Convention to have expressed for them, 
in the resolution found on page 5, their sincere 
love for the Bishop of this Diocese. This expres- 
sion of love not only comes from the few dele- 
gates at the Convention, but from all the members 
of the Church throughout the whole Diocese. Our 
Diocese is truly blessed in having Bishop Darst 
as our Diocesan, and it must be the will of the 
membership of the Church in this Diocese to show 
forth our thankfulness "not only with our lips, 
but in our lives" by more truly following our be- 
loved leader in the vears before us. 



CONVENTION NEXT YEAR 

THE next Diocesan Convention will meet the 
fourth Wednesday of January, 1931, in St. 
Paul's Church, Greenville. The new parish house 
is now under construction and is expected to be 
completed by the late fall. 

When the Convention meets in 1931, it will 
probably be the first time it has met in Greenville 
since May. 1890. At this 1890 meeting the Rt. 
Rev. A. A. Watson, D. D., was Bishop, the Rev. 
Thomas Atkinson was rector of St. John's, Fay- 
etteville, and the Rev. Robert Strange was rector 



of St. James', Wilmington. At that time the 
total "assessment" on the "parishes, missions and 
congregations" was 82,167.00. 



OMITTED ARTICLES 

ON account of the Diocesan Convention re- 
ports taking so much space it is impossible 
to print in this number of the Mission Herald all 
the material on hand. The articles omitted will 
be used in the June and July numbers. 



MRS. MacMILLAN'S ADDRESS 

IT may be the habit of the male readers of the 
Mission Herald not to read the articles ap- 
pearing under the head of the Woman's Auxiliary. 
We would like to call the attention of the men 
to Mrs. MacMillan's address to the Woman's Aux- 
iliary at the recent Convention. It begins on 
page 13, and is well worth your while to read. 
Most of it applies, not only to the women at work 
in the Church, but also to the men. The men of 
the Church will do well to read it most thought- 
fully. 



NEW PLAN OF APPORTIONMENT 

IN this number, beginning on page 6, the New 
Apportionment Plan is printed. This new plan 
for apportioning the parishes and missions was 
adopted unanimously at the recent Convention. 
Every vestryman should study this plan carefully 
and each congregation should have it thoroughly 
explained to them and kept before them through- 
out the year. It is a most intelligent and pro- 
gressive step over the plan used for many years. 



ADVANCE WORK OF THE CHURCH 



THE Advance program of the Church, as adopt- 
ed by the National Council under the author- 
ity of the General Convention, is one of our im- 
portant obligations for this year, to the cause of 
the Church's Mission. 

It was therefore decided by General Convention 
in 1928 that the quotas should thereafter include 
only what was necessary for maintenance and that 
a special effort should be made during this tri- 
ennium between the sessions of General Conven- 
tion, to secure a sum of money necessary for the 
new equipment, buildings, etc., which are neces- 
sary for the growth and development of our mis- 
sionary enterprise. 

It is manifest that if our bishops and other 
missionaries are successful in their labors, there 
must be growth, and this growth in the preach- 
ing of the Gospel must mean more churches, 
larger schools and hospitals, and increased facil- 
ities and equipment. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



New iMethod of Apportionment 

(Continued frvm page 7) 



This 70% of the reported current expenses of 
the Parishes and Missions of the Diocese is nec- 
essary to provide the money required to care for 
the present appropriations as outlined in the Bud- 
get. In the light of this fact it is absolutely 
necessary for the Parishes and Missions to ac- 
cept as their goal an apportionment equal to 100% 
of their reported current expenses, else there is 
no provision made for future growth. 

The Parishes and Missions that are today pay- 
ing an apportionment of 70 to 100% of their re- 
ported current expenses must, of necessity, con- 
ttinue for the present, until the Parishes and Mis- 
sions that pay below the normal basis increase 
their giving by the method given. 

In this matter we are facing facts, 70% of the 
reported current expenses is needed for present 
appropriations. Based upon the need of the pre- 
sent alone without giving consideration for the 
future growth the reasonableness and wisdom of 
the plan as outlined must be apparent. It is evi- 
dent to all who study the Budget of the Diocese 
■that the Parishes and the Missions of the Diocese 
must accept as a minimum of responsibility an 
apportionment equal to 70% of their reported cur- 
rent expenses if the work as outlined in the Bud- 
get be carried to completion. 

The Parishes and Missions paying an apportion- 
ment below 70% should realize that other Parishes 
and Missions must pay far above the normal basis 
if an average of 70%, the amount required for 
present appropriations, is obtained. 

IMPORTANT 

It should be noted that approximately 30% of 
the accepted apportionments of the Parishes and 
Missions is for the support of the Episcopate and 
other necessary Diocesan Expenses. This 30% 
we, of necessity, must pay — the balance we give 
for the support of our Diocesan Missions and for 
the work of the Genei'al Church. 

A PROGRAM 

1. That in any Mission Field receiving aid 
from the Diocese where satisfactory increase is 
reported for a period of three years, as compared 
with the previous triennium, in Church School 
pupils and in the number of confirmations, and 
where the apportionments are paid in full each 
year for the same period of three years, the salary 
of the Minister-in-charge be increased $300, the 
Diocese paying 50% and the Mission Field 50% 
of said increase. That a similar increase be made 
every three years based upon the same require- 
ments and plan until the Minister-in-charge shall 
have obtained an income equal to $3,000.00 a year. 



That the Parochial Reports received from the 
Parishes and Missions for the triennium 1927 to 
1929 be used as a starting point for this advance. 
That this increase apply to white and colored 
alike. 

2. That if any Mission Field receiving aid 
from the Diocese fails to report an increase for 
three years in comparison with the previous tri- 
ennium in Church School pupils and in confirma- 
tions and fails to pay its apportionment in full 
each year for the same period of three years, the 
work in that Mission Field shall be studied by the 
Committees on Evaluation and on Apportionment 
and Appropriations, who, after such study shall 
report their findings and recommendations to the 
Bishop and Executive Council. 

3. That money received for advance work be 
used (a) for the development and extension of 
the Mission Fields already established where in 
the judgment of the Bishop and Executive Coun- 
cil, with an increased appropriation a more con- 
structive work may be done; (b) for the planting 
and developing of the Church in such places where 
it is not established and where in the judgment 
of the Bishop and Executive Council a construc- 
tive work may be done. 

This plan rewards work well done. It provides 
for change in such fields where results have not 
justified the expenditures made. It provides for 
the opening of new fields. 

The adoption of this report provides: 1. The 
Diocese with a gradual increase in receipts — es- 
sential to its growth and expansion. 2. It gives 
the assurance to contributors that the money will 
be spent to the best advantage in securing the 
desired results. 



FAITH AND PRAYER 

A WOMAN came to a missionary at Bengalore, 
India, asking him to stop a certain Christian 
from praying for her. "I used to perform my 
worship to the idols comfortably," she is reported 
as saying, "but now I cannot do so. He told me 
he was praying for my family, and now my son 
and two daughters have become Christian. He 
is always bringing things to pass with his prayers. 
Somebody must make him stop!" 



IN JAPAN 

ONE of the most distinguished officials of the 
Japanese Court is the Vice-Minister of the 
Imperial Household. His wife and children have 
been church people for some time and he himself 
has become a catechumen. His son, a graduate 
of the Imperial University, has been a student 
at the Church's Theological School, at Ikebukuro, 
and goes next fall to England to continue his pre- 
paration for the ministry. 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



DELEGATES TO PROVINCIAL SYNOD 

Rev. W. R. Noe Mr. John R. Tolar 

Rev. B. F. Huske, D. D. Mr. John G. Dawson 

Rev. G. F. Hill Mr. G. R. Little 

Rev. Alexander Miller Dr. C. J. Sawyer 

Rev. Stephen Gardner Mr. Joseph Huske 

Rev. W. A. Lillycrop Mr. J. Q. Beckwith 

Alternate Delegates 

Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D. Rev. C. E. Williams 
Rev. I deL. Brayshaw Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D. 
Rev. Jean A. Vache Rev. F. D. Dean 

MEMBERS OF EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Bishop, Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

Rev. Wm. H. Milton. D. D.. Vice-Chairman, Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

Rev. Walter R. Noe, Member Ex-officio Secretary 
and Treasurer. Wilmington, N. C. 

For One Year: 

Rev. C. E. Williams, Creswell, N. C. 
Rev. Archer Boogher, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Mr. John R. Tolar, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Mr. J. V. Grainger, Wilmington, N. C. 
Mrs. Victor Shelbume, Washington, N. C. 

For Two Years : 

Rev. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Rev. Alexander Miller. Wilmington, N. C. 
Major B. R. Huske, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Dr. Robert L. Carr, Greenville, N. C. 
Mrs. S. P. Adams, Wilmington, N. C. 

For Three Years : 

Rev. Wm. H. Milton, D. D., Wilmington, N. C. 
Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, Greenville, N. C. 
Mr. George C. Royall, Goldsboro, N. C. 
Mr. George B. Elliott, Wilmington, N. C. 
Mrs. H. J. MacMillan, Wilmington, N. C. 

COMMITTEE ON COLORED HOSPITAL 

Mrs. J. D. Whitford, Rev. R. I. Johnson, Dr. D. 
E. Ford, Mr. George C. Royall, Mrs. R. N. Duffey. 
Miss Charlotte S. Rhone, Isaac H. Smith, Rev. 
Stephen Gardner, Mr. Wm. Dunn, Rev. Guy H. 
Madara, Prof. J. T. Barber, Dr. Thomas M. Green. 
Dr. Ira M. Hardy. 



ST. JOHN'S, WILMINGTON 



ST. John's Church, Wilmington, was the scene of 
a beautiful service on Passion Sunday evening 
April sixth, when the rite of confirmation was 
administered by Bishop Darst, upon a large class 
presented by the Rector. The Junior Choir sang 
at this service, and Bishop Darst dedicated a 
beautiful Processional Cross presented by Mrs. 
H. F. Wilder, in loving memory of her brother, 



Nash E. Bunting. The Cross is to be used by the 
Junior Choir, and after the dedicatory prayers 
the Bishop spoke most tenderly and fittingly of 
Mr. Bunting as a life long and loyal member of 
St. John's Church and of his great love for child- 
ren and of the children's great love for him. 



ST. MARY'S, KINSTON 



THE Rev. W. A. Pearman, temporary rector 
of St. Mary's Church, has returned to Bed- 
ford City, Va., after five months here. The Ves- 
try called him to supply after the resignation of 
the Rev. Harrel J. Lewis, until Dr. Huske could 
take up the work. His services were most 
satisfactory and he made a great many friends 
while with us, also Mrs. Pearman was quite popu- 
lar and considered a most charming woman as 
well as very helpful to Mr. Pearman with the 
Church work, and was very popular socially. She 
was given several farewell parties by close friends. 
Our Sunday School at present is very active, 
we have a splendid attendance every Sunday 
morning. Also the Young People's Service League 
is well attended every Sunday evening at six- 
thirty. They meet in the Parish House and are 
served supper by some of the ladies in the Parish. 



GOOD SHEPHERD, WILMINGTON 



DURING Lent our Church School carried out 
the program sent out from National Head- 
quarters using the posters, stories and prayers 
each Sunday. In addition to these, to stimulate in- 
terest in the Lenten Offering, we had a large map 
of the world and two minature boats made of card- 
board, which were put on the map with push 
pins, so they could be moved each week. The 
stops were marked with large gold stars, and 
smaller red stars marked the course between. On 
Quinquagesima Sunday we started the two boats 
from New York in a race around the world. One 
boat was the "Good Shepherd", flying the Church 
flag. The other boat "Pleasure", flying the flag 
of self. The cost of the entire trip was $230.00, 
the goal set by the Church School. We worked 
on a basis of 4,000 miles, traveling 500 miles a 
week at the cost of $5.75 per 100 miles or $28.75 
for the 500 miles. 

The mite boxes were the furnace, and the money 
put in was the fuel. The children were told, all 
the money they spent for movies, candy, peanuts, 
ice cream, cold drinks, etc., would speed the pleas- 
ure boat on, while denying ourselves of these 
things would help the Good Shepherd boat (which 
was carrying the Gospel of Jesus Christ, to those 
who sit in darkness) to win. The pleasure boat 
was allowed to travel the allotted distance, 500 



THE MISSION HERALD 



11 



miles each week, and the Good Shepherd boat 
traveled according to the total amount of money 
in the boxes, an estimate was taken each Sunday. 
For Example, the first Sunday the estimate was 
only S16.25 from the boxes, therefore, the Good 
Shepherd boat could only go 300 miles instead of 
the 500 it was supposed to go. And so on through 
Lent the boats traveled. The Pleasure boat kept 
gaining ; at one time she was about 800 miles 
ahead. Our Rector, who is Superintendent of the 
school, created a great deal of interest'in the trip 
by a booster talk, before the boats were moved. 
One of the men was the Captain to move the boat 
after getting up steam and blowing, another man 
of the school (the only one knowing the estimate, 
all the classes handing him their slips) would 
after several guesses by the school, announce how 
far Good Shepherd boat was to go, and then it was 
moved forward. 

Under the splendid leadership of our Rector and 
his teaching and example of self sacrificing and 
giving, the school learned the truth that "it is 
more blessed to give than to receive". They were 
unwilling for Pleasure to win so with many self- 
denials they put fuel in the furnace, and on Easter 
Day, with an offering of $231.39, the Good Shep- 
herd boat steamed into the harbor at Seattle ahead 
of the Pleasure boat. Boxes coming in late 
brought the total offering to $260.00, and every 
class in the Church School went over its individual 
class goal. 

At the Church School Easter Festival at which 
time the offering was presented we had a large 
boat (a brig) at the foot of the Chancel Steps 
and as the classes were called up the offering was 
placed in the boat. Then the small boat on the 
map was moved as the total of the offering was 
announced. 

The following was our Itinerary : 

New york to Liberia, 500 miles at $5.75 per 100 
or $28.75 for 500 Quinquagesima ; Liberia to Ca- 
nal Zone, 500 miles at $5.75 per 100 or $28.75 for 
500, first Sunday in Lent; Canal Zone to Honolulu, 
500 miles at $5.75 per 100 or $28.75 for 500, second 
Sunday in Lent ; Honolulu to Alaska, 500 miles at 
$5.75 per 100 or 828.75 for 500, third Sunday in 
Lent ; Alaska to Japan, 500 miles at $5.75 per 100 
or $28.75 for 500, fourth Sunday in Lent; Japan 
to Philippine Islands, touching China, 500 miles 
at $5.75 per 100 or $28.75 for 500, fifth Sunday 
in Lent; Philippine Islands to Middle Pacific, 500 
miles at $5.75 per 100 or $28.75 for 500, sixth 
Sunday in Lent; Middle Pacific to Seattle, 500 
miles at $5.75 per 300 or $28.75 for 500, Easter 
Day. 

We had a very blessed Easter in Good Shepherd 
Parish. Two beautiful and worshipful services 



in the morning, and the Church School Festival 
in the afternoon, when a splendid progTam was 
presented by the Church School Service League. 
At the early celebration of the Holy Communion 
there was the benediction of two memorials, one 
an Altar Service given by the Altar Guild, in 
memory of Sister Cecelia, and a Chancel Prayer 
Book in memory of Mrs. Charlie Farrar Meier, 
by her family. In addition to these memorials 
a gold cross, the gift of the Lenten Junior Choir 
to the Rector and some new vestments were bless- 
ed. 

At the eleven o'clock service, our beloved Bishop 
was with us (as has been his custom for many 
Easters)and confirmed a class of fourteen. 

Since the sixteenth of March twenty children 
have been baptized in the Parish. At the cele- 
bration of the Holy Communion on the first Sun- 
day in May there will be the benediction of an- 
other memorial, a Litany Book, the gift of Mrs. 
W. B. Land, in memory of her husband, William 
Benjamin Land. 



PRESENT MADE TO ST. GEORGE'S CHURCH 



A MOST acceptable gift has recently been be- 
stowed upon St. George's Church by the 
good people of St. Peter's Church, Washington, 
N. C. It was through the sweet thoughtfulness 
of Mrs. L. S. Small, and the unlimited interest 
that was shown by Cadet William Hasking, that 
St. George's Church at Lake Landing, N. C, is 
made more beautiful by having been given two 
sets of lovely felt altar hangings. They were 
gratefully received, and the Parish at large wishes 
to express sincere thanks to all concerned who 
have so beautifully helped to make another place 
of worship more complete, and who so generously 
helped others who are less fortunate. 



AN APPRECIATION 

To George C. Royall on His Seventieth Birthday 

By A Friend From Boyhood 



(From the Goldsboro News-Argus, of May 17th) 
By Col. Jos. E. Robinson 

One of Goldsboro's native, most aggressive and 
appreciated citizens, Mr. George C. Royall, is to- 
day passing the mile stone in life's journey that 
marks him seventy years young, exemplifying as 
he does in his splendid personality, vigorous ac- 
tivity and every day achievement the virile prow- 
ess of Goldsboro that he has been such a potential 
factor in developing from its village days in his 
youth into "The Best Town in The State." 

George Royall's life in Goldsboro is an open 
book, every page of which chronicles public-spirit- 
ed ideals for the community, unselfish service to 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



his fellow citizens, untiring activity for achieve- 
ment, ready sympathy and uplifting words of 
cheer in ordeals of stress, and responsive generous 
help in cases of personal need. 

As an ideal parent, a loyal friend, an exemplary 
churchman, an upright citizen, an unostentatious 
philanthropist, a business man of broad vision and 
sagacious judgment, those who have been privi- 
leged to associate with him and enjoy his com- 
panionship and work with him in civic endeavors 
for community betterment appreciate him and 
realize what his example has meant to them in 
patterning their own individual lives. And so we 
feel that all Goldsboro today, as he stands on the 
threshold of "three-score-and-ten" and faces the 
future with undimmed eye and unfaltering pur- 
pose, will cordially wish George C. Royall yet 
many years of health and happiness in our midst 
— among the people he loves so well — his "home 
folks", who reciprocate his loyalty. 

And especially do those of us who have come 
along the road with him and who best know him 
at his real worth and are familiar with what he 
has meant to Goldsboro, realize that indeed "it 
is not all of life to live," and therefore, grateful 
for the gift of faith in the communion of saints, 
through which we are assured of "Life more a- 
bundantly" in "that sphere that holds the dis- 
embodied spirits of the just", we can — somewhat 
paraphrazing the beautiful lines of Anna Letitia 
Barbauld on "Life" — say of him: 

"We have been long together 
Through pleasant and through cloudy 
weather ; 
'Tis hard to part when friends are dear 
'Twill surely cast a sigh, a tear; 

Then steal away, give little warning, 

Choose thine own time; 

Say not goodnight — but in some brighter 

chime 
Bid us good morning." 

IN MEMORIAM 



At her home in Wilmington, North Carolina, 
on the 16th of May, 1930, in her hundreth year, 
Mary Wendell, daughter of the late Hannah Maria 
and Dr. Matthew Wendell, of Brooklyn, New York, 
and a half sister of the late Rt. Rev. A. A. Watson, 
the first Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina, 
entered into the calm of "Paradise the blest." 

Here was a great saint ! For with the humblest 
consciousness of her own unworthiness she pos- 
sessed the clearest aspirations after the highest 
in the Christian Life, and lived this out in every 
relation and association of a life of nearly a cen- 
tury. 



With an unswerving loyalty to the Church of 
her choice — its traditions, its creeds, its worship 
and sacred customs ; she coupled the largest char- 
ity for others not of her faith and fellowship. 

Truly it might be said of her in the words of 
St. Paul, "as poor yet making many rich, as hav- 
ing nothing and yet possessing all things ; as dy- 
ing and behold she lives." 



CHRIST SCHOOL. ARDEN 



THE year 1930 marks thirty years since Christ 
School was founded by the Rev. Thomas C. 
Wetmoi*e. The manifold blessings of these years 
have been ever increasing. God has cared for His 
work here. 

Our aim has been to make Christ a Living 
Reality to all who have come to us, to help them 
to live the Christ Life. The Chapel, school rooms, 
farm, shop, gymnasium, dormitories and every- 
thing on the Christ School hill are essential means 
to this end. Practical Christianity is best de- 
veloped through Christian education. The Joy 
of the Lord has been the strength of the past 
thirty years. This might truly be called the "Hill 
of Happiness." 

Christ School is only for boys who have no other 
opportunity, whose environment precludes de- 
velopment. 

The total enrollment has numbered many thous- 
ands, the earlier pupils are middle aged men and 
women now. Very many of those who have gone 
out from Christ School into their mountain coun- 
try are making good, they are showing forth the 
praise of God with both their lips and their lives. 
They stand for the best and highest. There are 
now one hundred and ten boarding pupils at Christ 
School. There are about six million native people 
in the Southern Appalachan Mountains. So we 
are training our boys to be leaders among their 
own people. They are helping many whom we 
cannot reach. "Christ is All and in All." 

I wish I could stop here but I feel like the 
mountain woman who came to me a short time 
ago and said: "There's trouble up the branch 
and I'm plum Weeded to tell yer bout hit." 

The financial anxiety of carrying on this work 
in the school and in the contmunity increases, be- 
cause each year the Department of Missions in 
the National Executive Council is obliged to de- 
crease the appropriation for all the Missions of the 
Church. There is a very general impression that 
Christ School is entirely supported by the De- 
partment of Missions. This is not so. 

During 1929 Christ School received only $2.- 
989.20 through the Department of Missions. 

Some of our one hundred and ten boarding pu- 
pils can pay nothing, some can pay a little, a few 



THE MISSION HERALD 



13 



pay the whole $200.00 which it cost for board and 
tuition for each pupil for a school year. There 
are many additional expenses such as insurance, 
equipment, repairs, etc. We have eight salaried 
workers. The reason why the school can be car- 
ried on with so few workers is that each one is 
doing the work of two people. 

There has never been one cent of debt at Christ 
School. We closed the year 1929 with everything 
paid, but with very little to carry on. 

I ask you, who have been so unfailingly loyal 
and generous, to give here what you have given 
in former years — and to interest others in Christ 
School. I ask all who receive this message to 
help us. With God there is neither much nor 
little only the offering of Love. 

SUSAN WETMORE, Principal 



A A A A A A A Ail A AA A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A 

Wommae 9 § A naxiliary 

*:* Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. V 

X ,. X 

.}. Publicity Chairman ¥ 



ADDRESS TO WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 



IT has been four years since we have had an 
annual meeting in Wilmington and since it 
is my home, I want to add to that of the Parish 
my personal word of welcome to each and every 
one of you. As many of you know that last 
meeting meant a great deal to me as I took up the 
duties of an officer in East Carolina. I did it with 
fear and trembling at my own inability, only de- 
siring to be used in the service of our Lord and 
Master. I did not realize how much your fellow- 
ship and your loving assistance would mean to 
me as the days went on. I want to thank you 
for your generous loyalty in spite of my short- 
comings and. tell you that I realize that I have had 
the prayers of many of you and that I appreciate 
it. My work has taught me many things and has 
given me a new sense of spiritual fellowship. 

In many places in East Carolina this has been a 
very trying financial year. The successive crop 
failures, along with general depression has caused 
worry, heartaches and even disaster among our 
people in some sections. As you all know the 
Northern part of the Diocese has been more af- 
fected than the Southern part. 

In spite of this situation, most of the Auxiliary 
apportionments were paid early in the year, the 
work went forward and a great deal of additional 
money was raised. The total amount was not 
quite as much as in 1928 as during that year an 
unusual amount was provided for the Church 
Army Van, which is still in use in our Diocese. 
The Convocation of Wilmington went ahead this 



year $497.54, which brought up the total splendid- 
ly. I feel very much gi*atified over the results 
as it has been a year which has tried many of you. 
As we will possibly have the same conditions this 
year, I want to beg of you not to loose sight of the 
program of the whole church because you are 
having a struggle in your own parish. It may be 
difficult to continue this high standard but we 
must set our goals not only intelligently, but un- 
selfishly. 

After the Diocesan Conference in September I 
was away from the Diocese for some time but the 
work did not suffer in any way as Mrs. Adams 
was at the helm and she did my work better than 
I could have done it and in addition to it, carried 
on her own convocational duties. I cannot begin 
to express my gratitude to her for her cheerful 
and loving assistance. 

During my stay in France, I endeavored to get 
in touch with some of the Social Service work 
being done in and around the city of Paris. This 
study was well worth while and I enjoyed it. I 
like to feel that the French people are benefitting 
greatly today by the methods which they learned 
from American reconstruction work during and 
after the war. Since we have been trying to take 
a part in the Church's work in colleges, we have 
all become more or less familiar with the questions 
that are absorbing and interesting college stu- 
dents. Consequently I found it worth while to 
learn'something of the work being done by church 
women among the students in the Latin Quarter 
in Paris. The various students of different nation- 
alities and the unusual and fascinating individuals 
with whom these women work create an interest- 
ing field and they certainly supply opportunities 
for definite work for the church. 

All phases of Auxiliary work was brought be- 
fore you in your Program for the year. The 
Findings of the Triennial Meeting was used as its 
basis and special stress was laid on the Findings 
of the Committee on Personal Religion and Evan- 
gelism. You will recall the Ministry of Prayer, 
the Ministry of Books, the Ministry of Spoken 
Word, the Ministry of the Holy Communion, the 
Ministry of Example to which we added the Min- 
istry of Service. It was also planned that greater 
effort should be made in the study of the Mission 
Fields at home and abroad, and this has been 
done. Many copies of the Church's Program have 
been distributed and used. With the exception 
of a very few parishes, little or no increased vision 
of the opportunity for rural work seems to have 
been acquired. We need to take a fresh start, 
gain our rector's cooperation and find out some of 
the many things that are waiting for us in this 
field. 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The Provincial Objectives are the Advance Work, 

Training, and Enlistment for Service 

and Personal Evangelism. 

You all know that instead of a separate Cor- 
porate Gift, the women of the Church will work 
for the advance work program. We are pledged 
to raise $700.00 this year for the residence of 
native Chinese workers in Nanking. The Diocese 
has taken $3,000.00 for this objective. St. James, 
Wilmington, has taken in addition §10,000.00 for 
a Girl's Trade Building at the Voorhees School in 
South Carolina. Every woman should understand 
exactly how the General Church budget is being 
paid and lend their most intelligent interest to 
the Advance Work Program. 

The Maintenance budget has not yet been rais- 
ed. We have redeemed our promise to pay but 
we have not met the budget once. The Children's 
Church School Offerings and the woman's offer- 
ings ought to be used entirely for advance work 
or the work they are specially pledged to, never 
to simply pay expenses. 

If our Church is in any effective way to do 
this work we must cease to regard it as a tax or 
as a goal. If we regard it as a tax, we will al- 
ways be seeking to have it reduced, if as a goal 
we shall never be free of the danger of a deficit. 
The budget quota is the starting point. It is the 
minimum which is set by the General Convention 
for the continuance of work for which we have al- 
ready obligated ourselves. The work will begin 
to be in a healthy condition when our love for the 
cause of Christ calls forth our utmost generosity 
and when each Diocese and parish and mission 
shall set itself to see how much it can give beyond 
the quota. For four years we have been marking 
time and this is weary work. The time has come 
to move forward, to conquer new territory in the 
name of our Lord and Master. And only a for- 
ward move can bring enthusiasm. The question 
is up to us, what can the women of the Church 
do about it? They have been most enthusiastic 
about their specials and their Corporate Gift. 
Can they not encourage, educate, and work for 
the advance program with even greater enthusi- 
asm? The two words "Advance Work" are pack- 
ed full of possibilities. Look for the romance in 
them, look for the adventure, the courage, the 
faith, the love, look for splendor of great accom- 
plishments. Let's make our advance work in East 
Carolina mean much more than an apportionment. 
Let's make it a thrilling adventure. 

I want to urge that there be a better organiza- 
tion of the district lines, more regular district 
meetings, that each district has a full set of of- 
ficers and that the Diocesan officers attend these 
meetings when they are invited and that a real 



effort be made to link the churches work more 
closely together. It was decided at our meeting 
in Fayetteville that any organization that felt in 
need of it, could have the visit of their diocesan 
officers with no expense to them if they desire it. 
Of course the officers have made many visits but 
they are all desirous of increasing their useful- 
ness. Call on them in any department if you 
want them. I believe that through these contacts 
and through the district work, we can make the 
two greatest steps forward. The district meet- 
ings would bring the smaller places encourage- 
ment ; it will make all sections of the Diocese feel 
more responsibility for the whole program. It 
will also be productive of developing leadership 
and in giving more opportunities for individual 
service. 

Neither the Bishop nor I knew that Miss Mae 
Bonner had a scholarship at the Deaconess Train- 
ing School in Philadelphia until she had been there 
for some time. The Executive Board has been 
much interested in her since we knew about it 
and we are anxious to give her the assistance 
which she will be obliged to have before she fin- 
ishes her training. She is to enter a hospital for 
training as a nurse in September and Deaconess 
Stewart has called on us to stand back of her. 
Money was sent her out of the general expense 
fund this year and she has been very grateful to 
you. We must see her through. We need only 
to look back on the interest and assistance that the 
Auxiliary has given to Dr. Dissosway, Miss Cox 
and others to realize how important it is to do 
this type of work. We have a right to be proud 
of the women we have as missionaries and we 
must do our best for the training and equipment 
of others. 

As you know a fund was raised during the year 
with Miss Lona Weatherly, who teaches at Lake 
Phelps, was able to go to St. Faith's Training 
School in New York, for special study. She is 
also most appreciative of your help. 

My record of the work of the Auxiliary is read 
to the Convention, the other officers cover the 
same ground and I want to make this message to 
you brief. However, I want to bring you three 
distinct pictures, one of every church woman en- 
listed oi- re-enlisted for some part in Auxiliary 
work, one of the actual number of women who 
are carrying on the work in East Carolina and one 
of the individual woman w r ho is realizing her own 
particular responsibility for the establishment of 
the Kingdom. 

One thousand, seven hundred and thirty six 
women ! Did you realize that we have that many 
women in East Carolina actually on record this 
year as members of the Woman's Auxiliary to 



THE MISSION HERALD 



15 



the National Council? Can you visualize some 
of the opportunities we might have if none of this 
number were inactive? Suppose there was no 
lukewarmness or indifference on the part of our 
nominal members and that each one did whatever 
her circumstances or ability allowed her to do. 
At some time or other every single one of this 
number must have been interested in our work 
and for various reasons through the years slipped 
out of actual contact. There is much work to be 
clone and there is something every single one of 
them can do, even the busiest or the most feeble. 
But some one will have to establish these contacts 
again and revitalize them. In every parish and 
mission, there are also other women who have 
never been numbered in any organization, girls, 
young married women, strangers, business wo- 
men, college girls. It is our place to show them 
what a fellowship such as we have can mean. We 
can show them the opportunities for service and 
we can tell them about the great cause in which 
we have enlisted. With such a number as we 
might have, with Christ as our Leader and Com- 
rade, in the midst of our gatherings working His 
great purpose out in our lives and through our 
work for His Kingdom, we could do such marvel- 
ous things. My friends, let's go out and find, 
these women. 

There are reported eight hundred and sixty 
eight women actively interested in the meetings 
and in the results accomplished and although this 
is only one-half of the membership, it is still a 
large number. I know that many of you do splen- 
did work with serious handicaps and surmount 
many difficulties. Many of you give up social 
pleasures and make other sacrifices but I am sure 
you receive much joy in your service. Even with 
the number of inactive women, your officers feel 
no discouragement for the simple reason that we 
know there are so many among you who are filled 
with the Holy Spirit and that He is working in 
and through you. We know there are others 
keenly desiring His more intimate companionship 
and who will attain it through perseverance. We 
know that there are many who will eventually 
realize that service in His name need not be a 
duty but a joy and a privilege. Christ demands 
absolute surrender to His will for us and we find 
it hard to comply, but He gives us always encour- 
agement and love. It has always been a com- 
forting thought to me that in Christ's service, 
mental and physical drawbacks are no hindrances 
and He tells us that He has a special place for each 
one of us and that when we do His will He gives 
us power beyond our comprehension. So let us, 
in this meeting, pray for greater usefulness, great- 
er submission, greater loyalty and the ability to 



bring others in closer touch with our Master. 

After all it is the individual woman who is 
the second important factor in this fellowship. 
First, there must come to her the desire for ser- 
vice, then, a willingness to put it into the proper 
place in her life and to make the sacrifices it en- 
tails and ultimately there comes to her the abid- 
ing sense of the presence of the Holy Ghost. 

As your president, I have attended a large num- 
ber of meetings during the year and one meeting 
stands out in my mind particularly, because I was 
permitted to pay my tribute to one woman's life 
of simple beauty in her Master's service. At St. 
Mark's Church, in Wilmington, an elderly colored 
woman, Fannie Norwood, was especially honored 
by the people of her parish. They, who were 
gathered in the church heard unfolded, a record of 
service which it would be hard to equal. She had 
been the originator of the Missionary Society and 
then the president of the Auxiliary for over fifty 
years. She had also been the first among them 
to get an instinctive understanding of the mean- 
ing of Christian Social Service. One by one, stories 
were told of her love for her neighbors, her faith 
in God, her unwavering loyalty to her rector, her 
auxiliary and her parish. They were all stories 
of obedience to the two great commandments. 
At the close of the evening, it was lovely to see 
the humble gracious acknowledgement she made 
of her people's love for her. 

Let us take every means of increasing our 
knowledge of Christ as He moves in our lives to- 
day. Let us strive to realize that he is living 
among us, guiding and encouraging us as we make 
so many mistakes, only asking that we endeavor 
to have His mind in us. Let us try to become 
more and more conscious of His mystical com- 
panionship until we have completely given our- 
selves to Him and become obedient in all our re- 
lationships. Then, indeed, we will go forward 
with flaming hearts and steadfast purposes to 
have our places in the establishment of His King- 
dom. 

JANIE WILLIAMS MacMILLAN 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN 
SOCIAL SERVICE 



THE Christian Social Service Department in 
conference today, has asked that this Annual 
Meeting of the East Carolina Branch of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary present to the Diocesan Conven- 
tion now in session, a resolution in regard to the 
present condition of unemployment; i-equesting 
the clergy to do all in their power to deal with, 
and where possible, correct this condition in their 
communities. 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



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D. D.. Rector 



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VOL. XLIV 








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2 ; THE MISSION HE RALD 

JUNE INDEX read the Epistle and the Rev. Ilbert deL. Bray- 

Page shaw read the Gospel. The new Priest will have 

Bishop's Letter 3 charge of Trinity, Lumberton ; St. Stephen's, Red 

Young People's Camp 4 Springs and St. Matthew's, Maxton, beginning 

Diocesan Assembly, B. S. A. I 6 September 1st. 

Diocesan News 7 

Editorials 8 *«^*********^^ 

Advance Work __ 9 | JUfc iisi 1 «_ I 

Your Daughter., 9 | fMMflllttm I 

Prayer Leaflet .„__ : 10 A <^^ .*. 

St. Augustine's, England .. 10 | IF IT IS WEATHERLY'S CANDY IT IS GOOD £ 

May at the Orphanage „._,_.. 11 X w R WEATH ERLY & COMPANY | 

In Memonam 11 J ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. $ 

Woman's Auxiliary: .*. X 

Report to Convention _12 *—+*—*•+•+—+*+*——+—+*+**•+—* 

Letter from Miss Bonner 13 +++6&&&&&Mrfriri&4rt^&rt&&&&&&&&&<*&&&<*&&&&*> 

Church Periodical Club ...14 J ZOELLER'S STUDIO $ 

w , ^ w , , 1/1 X ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. % 

WOrKerS Wanted „14 t Photographs anything, anywhere, anytime, day or nieht, .*. 

Financial Statement 15 % dea<l or alive * 

| Send Us Your Kodak Films— We Give 24 { 

DIOCESAN NEWS S Hours Service % 

Wilmington, N. C. 
The Rev. Thomas H. Wright, II, who was recent- .j. .«. 

ly ordained priest, will give a part of his time *•* H. WjcjIIj & BROS. 

to college work under the direction of the Nation- * Goldsboro, N. C. X 

al Department of Religious Education. He will •{• ^ 

be at the Blue Ridge Conference, June 15th to % Specialists in apparel for Men, Women and Children .*. 

24th ; Camp Bonsall, where he will be Director, .x„x~x**':~:~x~mk~:~:~:~:^^^ 

June 25th to August 1st ; Conference at Sewanee, ««4>««^^^m^^«^&^<^^h>^i4m^<s>^<^i<^>^><>^m^ 

Tenn August 1st to 15th He will take charge | W. B. THORPE & CO. ! 

of the Lumberton field September 1st, and will .*. Wilmington N C *:* 

then give one week each month to college work. X _, , - _ ., ,. ■_ _- . , X 

Hertford, n. c. :| Coal and Building Material | 

The Rev. E. T. Jillson, Rector of Holy Trinity X " CALL 0N US X 

Church, and his wife will spend their vacation in •*—— —***—*— V— ——**—+— 

Rhode Island, Mr. Jillson's former home. ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

^ j -ii -vr r* h When in Elizabeth City, N. C. A 

Gatesville, N. C. & TATT ON *!' 

On June 11th, in St. Mary's Church, the Rev. | _ , — .. J National Rank ? 

Reginald W. Eastman, Minister-in-charge of Gali- X * irSt a * a ™\ Zei ? S , f SaUOnal CanK X 

lee Mission, Virginia Beach, Diocese of Southern j RES0U RCES OVER FOUR MILLION DOLLARS * 

Virginia, and Miss Isabelle Hofler were married. %^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^i^^^^^ 

The ceremony was performed by Bishop Darst 4h9«404»4$$$$4^^>4m^$$$$<h > ^$$$$<&$$$$$$<H > <&'S' 

of East Carolina, assisted by Bishop Thomas of | We take pleagure in seUing Books Let ug quote | 

Southern Virginia and the Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D., X you on your needs or wishes. } 

Rector of St. Paul's Church, Edenton. X „ „ T „__ T „„ _ X 

Wilmington, N. C. f P. W. MELICK Co. J 

On June 15th, 1930, in St. James' Church, the X Elizabeth city. n. c. y 

Rev. Thomas H. Wright, II, was ordained Priest ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 

by the Rt. Rev. i 'nomas C. Darst, D. D., Bishop \ rfMIWI llttLL .t. 

sermon was preached by the Rev. II. A. Woolfall, .f jMrH&jLta 9|Ml!4|\|Ja 

John A. Bryant of the Diocese of Washington, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^.^ 



The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, JUNE, 1930 



No. 6 



Bi§hop 9 § Letter 




On Thursday night, May the 
first, I paid my first official visit 
to our newest Mission, situated 
in Delgado Mill Village, in the 
suburbs of Wilmington. 

This Mission which is housed 
in one of the mill cottages, has 
shown great promise under the 
direction of Mr. Ashley T. St. Amand, one of our 
Diocesan Lay Readers. My visit followed a Mis- 
sion conducted by the Church Army, during which 
Mission many were brought to Baptism, and as 
a result of the Mission and of Mr. St. Amand's 
faithful efforts, I had the privilege of Confirming 
fourteen persons. 

On Saturday, the third, I Confirmed one person 
in St. Peter's Church, Washington. 

On Sunday, the fourth, I preached and cele- 
brated Holy Communion in St. Peter's Church, 
Washington, at 11 A. M. 

In the afternoon I preached and Confirmed six 
persons, presented by the Rev. Sidney E. Mat- 
thews, in Zion Church, Jessama. 

On the night of the fourth, I preached and 
Confirmed twenty-seven persons, presented by the 
Rev. Stephen Gardner, in St. Peter's Church, 
Washington. 

On the night of the fifth, I preached, and Con- 
firmed two persons, presented by the Rev. S. N. 
Griffith, in St. Philips Church, Elizabeth City. 

On the night of the sixth, I preached at an anni- 
versary service in my old parish, St. Paul's, New- 
port News, Va. 

On Sunday, the eleventh, at 11 A. M., I preach- 
ed and Confirmed six persons, presented by the 
Rev. Archer Boogher, in St. John's Church, Fay- 
etteville. 

On the night of the eleventh I preached and 
Confirmed nineteen persons, presented by the Rev. 
John W. Herritage, D. D., in St. Joseph's Church, 
Fayetteville. 

On Tuesday, the thirteenth, I presided at the 
first meeting of the Diocesan Assembly of the 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew, in St. Paul's Parish 
House, Wilmington. 

On the fourteenth and fifteenth, I presided over 



the Annual Meeting of the Diocesan Convention 
in St. Paul's Church, Wilmington. 

On Sunday, the eighteenth, I preached, cele- 
brated Holy Communion and Confirmed four per- 
sons, presented by the Rev. A. C. D. Noe, in Holy 
Innocent's Church, Lenoir County. Following this 
service a bountiful lunch was served on the 
grounds, and at two-thirty in the afternoon, the 
Rev. B. F. Huske. D. D., the new rector of St. 
Mary's Church, Kinston, preached. 

On Thursday afternoon, the twenty-second, I 
attended and took part in the funeral service of 
my dear friend, Mr. Samuel S. Nash, in Calvary 
Church, Tarboro. In the death of Mr. Nash, the 
Church in North Carolina has lost one of its most 
devoted and loyal soldiers and servants and the 
Church Triumphant has gained a radiant soul. 

On the night of the twenty-second I preached 
and Confirmed twelve persons, presented by the 
Rev. Robert I. Johnson, in St. Cyprian's Church, 
New Bern. 

On Sunday, the twenty-fifth, at 11 A. M., I 
preached and celebrated Holy Communion in 
Trinity Church, Lumberton. 

On the afternoon of the twenty-fifth, I preached 
and Confirmed one person, presented by the Rev. 
W. R. Noe, in St. Stephen's Church, Red Springs. 

On Sunday, June first, I preached the Baccalau- 
reate Sermon in Christ Church School, Middlesex 
County, Virginia. 

On Tuesday, the third, I attended the Com- 
mencement exercises of St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
in the morning and a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of the School in the afternoon. 

This letter is being written on June the seventh 
and am to be in Goldsboro and Pikeville for ser- 
vice in St. Stephen's and St. George's on Sunday, 
the eighth. 

On Sunday, the fifteenth, I am to ordain the 
Rev. Thomas H. Wright, II, to the Priesthood in 
St. James' Church, Wilmington, and on Tuesday, 
the seventeenth, I am to ordain Mr. John Q. Beck- 
with, Jr., to the Diaconate in Trinity Church, 
Lumberton. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Yoeog People's Gamp 

A CAMP for all young' people of the Diocese, 
between the ages of 14 and 25, is going to 
be held at Camp Leach, the recently acquired 
camping ground fourteen miles below Washington 




REV. I. deL. BRAYSHAW, Director 

on the Pamlico river. These grounds have been 
used for a period of years as Camp grounds, and 
while improvements and additions are necessary, 




(which are being done at the present time) will 
make a most excellent center for the gathering 
together of our young people and we hope a train- 
ing center for our older people in the future. 

In order to clarify our position, it may be stat- 
ed at the outset, that there is no spirit of opposit- 
ion or competition, to or with the Lake Kanuga 




MAIN BUILDING 



REV. F. D. DEAN, M. D. 
Camp Physician. In Charge of Junior Camp 

Conferences. Through the kindness of the leaders 
of the Kanuga Conferences we have for the past 
several years had a number of our boys and girls 
present each Summer at the Young People's Camp. 
But it has always been felt that Kanuga could not 
reach our young people as we wish them reached 
because of the distance and expense incident to 
their attendance. Nearly every Diocese in the 
Province of Sewanee realizes the importance of 
a Diocesan Camp, especially for the first two years 
of Camp life, looking toward Kanuga and Sewanee 
for more advanced work with the maturer boys 
and girls. In fact, a program of studies for five 
years is now being worked out on this basis and 
this year some of the required studies which will 
be given in the Diocesan Camps will not be offered 
at Sewanee. 

Those who are interested in developing the work 
among the young people believe that they have a 
real opportunity, such as has not been presented 
before. We have a superb location which in every 
way lends itself to the purpose to which it is to be 
put. The location of the Camp makes for a healthy 
state of body, the water has been analysed and 
found pure, and we can guarantee well balanced 
and satisfying meals. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



The camp directors have had some years of 
experience in this work and are in touch with 
every phase of camp life and every precaution is 
taken to safeguard our young people. 

Beginning our preparations for this Summer's 
Camp at a late date we will need the earnest co- 




ENTRANCE TO CAMP— RIVER IN BACKGROUND 

operation of all, clergy and laity alike, to make 
this year's camp a success. We can take Care of 
125 to 150, and it is most necessary that we have 
at least 100 young people at the first camp and 
as near that number as possible for the Junior 
Camps which will open immediately on the clos- 
ing of the older boys and girls camp. 

Special descriptive and illustrated folders have 
been sent to all the clergy in the Diocese, or copies 
may be procured from the Rev. I. deL. Brayshaw, 
St. James' Parish House. Wilmington. N. C. 

WHO WILL GIVE A SCHOLARSHIP? 
There are many boys and girls in the Diocese 
v> no would like to go to Camp, and who would be 




good material to work on. who will lie unable 
because of finances to enjoy the privilege. Their 
Churches or Service Leagues are not able to send 
them. 

Perhaps there are some readers who have no 
boys or girls that they can send. Why not furn- 
ish a scholarship for some other boy or girl? You 
may designate the Camper, or leave the selection 
to the Camp Directors. 

Checks should be sent to the Rev. I. deL. Bray- 
shaw, St. .Tames' Parish House. Wilmington, N. C. 



THE STAFF 
Rev. I. deL. Brayshaw. Director. 
Director of Religious Education and Young 
People's work in the Diocese of East Carolina. 
Assistant Director of Kanuga Conference for 
Young People and Joint Diocesan Camps in South 
Carolina for seven vears. 




PAMLICO RIVER AND PIER 



BARRACKS 

Rev. Frank D. Dean. M. D„ Associate Director 

Formerly in charge of Young People's work and 
Physician at the Camps for past four or five years. 
Known to everybody in the Diocese. 

Rev. W. A. Lillycrop. Chaplain 

Rector at Greenville, N. C, and in charge of 
student work at East Carolina Teachers' College. 
Instructor in Personal Religion. 

Rev. Walter R. Noe 

Executive Secretary of the Diocese. Instruct- 
or in The Church's Program. 

Rev. Worth Wicker 

Rector at Belhaven, Fairfield and Lake Landing. 
Instructor in the Life of Christ. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Rev. Jean Vache 

Rector of Beaufort and Morehead City. In- 
structor in Prayer Book and Church Music. 

The list of Counsellors and Associates is not 
yet complete, but it includes Mrs. C. C. Branch, 
Camp Mother of several years experience, Jack 
Beckwith. Theological Seminary student, and 
Evangeline Beckwith. who has several years of 
Camping experience. 



Dioeesae Assembly 

BROTHERHOOD OF ST. ANDREW 

THE first Annual Meeting of the Assembly of 
the Brotherhood of St. Andrew in the Dio- 
cese of East Carolina was held at St. Paul's Parish 
House at Wilmington, N. C, on Tuesday, May 13, 
1930, at 4:00 P. M. 

The Assembly was opened with the singing of 
the St. Andrew's Hymn and Prayer by the Rt. 
Rev. Thomas C. Darst, Bishop of East Carolina. 
Mr. C. McD. Davis, President of the Assembly, 
presided and Mr. J. Q. Beckwith was appointed 
acting Secretary. The roll was called as follows : 

Elizabeth City, N. C, Christ Church 

Mr. W. H. Zoeller, Mr. G. R. Little, Rev. Geo. 

F. Hill, Mr. Wm. P. Skinner. 

Greenville, N. C, St. Paul's Church 

Mr. P. W. Picklesimer. Mr. Paul Hill, Mr. Lin- 
wood Jones, Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, Mr. R. L. Totten, 
Mr. W. F. Cherry, Mr. Staff Kasey, Mr. P. H. 
Kasey. 

Washington, N. C., St. Peter's Church 
Mr. Wm. Harding, Mr. S. F. Alligood, Mr. John 

G. Bragaw, Mr. Thomas G. Moore, Rev. Stephen 
Gardner. 

Lumberton, N. C, Trinity Church 

Mr. D. R. Shaw, Mr. R. C. Lawrence, Mr. James 

D. Beckwith. Mr. E. T. LaGrone, Mr. J. Q. Beck- 
wit li. 

Wilmington, N. C, St. James' Church 

Dr. John B. Cranmer, Mr. Geo. B. Elliott, Rev. 
W. H. Milton. 

Wilmington, N. G, Good Shepherd Church 

Rev. John Benners Gibble. 

Wilmington, N. C, St. John's Church 
Mr. McC. B. Wilson, Mr. M. M. Hinnant, Rev. 

E. W. Halleck, Mr. C. McD. Davis, Mr. T. B. Ander- 
son. 

Wilmington, N. C, St. Paul's Church 

Mr. John L. Hazelhurst, Rt. Rev. Thomas C. 
Darst. Mr. J. H. Hinton, Rev. W. R. Noe, Mr. W. 



0. S. Southerland, Mr. John L. Hazelhurst, Sr., 
Mr. C. L. Myers, Rev. Alexander Miller. 

Belhaven. N. C. 

Rev. Woi-th Wicker. 

Washington, D. C. 

Mr. H. Lawrence Choate. 

Mr. W. P. Skinner made a very favorable re- 
port from Christ Church, Elizabeth City, N.- C, 
and stated that his chapter would arrange to call 
in a body on nearby chapters reported as inactive. 

Mr. P. H. Kasey reported considerable interest 
and regular meetings at St. Paul's Church, Green- 
ville, N. C. Of the eleven members of that chap- 
ter, eight were present in the Assembly. 

Mr. John G. Bragaw reported active work at 
St. Peter's Church, Washington, N. C, and the 
Rev. Stephen Gardner reported that the chapter 
was doing definite, active work in the parish. 

Mr. D. R. Shaw, Lumberton, N. C, stated that 
each male member of the Church was a member 
of the Brotherhood. 

Dr. Cranmer reported that while the B. S. A. 
was not functioning actively at St. James' Church, 
a part of the work of the Brotherhood was done 
by the men in the Brotherhood of St. James', 
which organization enacted the establishing of the 
present chapter in St. James' and while he could 
not report progress it was felt both by Dr. Cran- 
mer and Dr. Milton as well as by Mr. George B. 
Elliott, that the spirit of the B. S. A. was being 
actively carried out by the twelve laymen of that 
parish. Dr. Cranmer stated that he hoped that 
later they would come into the Brotherhood of 
St. Andrew and receive the benefits of the Nation- 
al Organization. 

Mr. Gibble reported from the Good Shepherd 
six live members of the chapter who had become 
a real force in the work of the Church. During 
Lent these men posted cards advertising lenten 
services in all the churches. The result of that 
work materially increased the attendance, certain- 
ly at the Good Shepherd, and probably in other 
churches in the city. 

Mr. Hazelhurst reported for St. Paul's Church, 
Wilmington, N. C. This chapter is concentrating 
on individual work. In one case the result of the 
work of one member of the chapter led twenty- 
seven baptisms and eleven confirmations. 

Mr. Troy B. Anderson reported for St. John's 
Church, stating that they have in this chapter 
twenty members, the largest chapter in the Dio- 
cese. Five layreaders are studying under the 
Rector. Hotel Committees and other definite 
work is being done by this chapter. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Bishop Darst spoke very helpfully on reviving 
interest among the inactive chapters, and Mr. 
Choate, National President, suggested two me- 
thods, one for a nearby chapter to call in a body 
on the inactive chapter and the other method for 
members of the Executive Committee to visit the 
various points. 

Mr. Choate spoke very feelingly on the belief 
in prayer and suggested that at the chapter meet- 
ings study be given to the Rev. Mr. Atwater's 
PBook on the Episcopal Church and the Hand 
Book. 

After a general discussion the following officers 
were elected for the ensuing year : 

Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, Honorary President ; 
Mr. C. McD. Davis, President; Mr. P. H. Kasey, 
Vice-President ; Mr. J. Q. Beckwith, Secretary and 
Treasurer ; Rev. Alexander Miller, Chaplain. 

Mr. Davis made a short and enthusiastic talk 
on the work for the coming year. The Rev. Mr. 
Miller closed the meeting with prayer. On mo- 
tion the meeting was adjourned and the Assembly 
retired to the dining room where they were served 
a delightful supper prepared by the ladies of St. 
Paul's Parish. 

Mr. P. H. Kasey, Vice-President, was appointed 
to express to the ladies, the appreciation of the 
Assembly, which he did in a few well chosen 
words. 

The Assembly reconvened at 8:00 P. M. with 
about one hundred and fifty men, who listened 
to three very inspiring addresses. The speakers 
were: Mr. John G. Bragaw, St. Peter's Church, 
Washington, N. C. ; Mr. H. Lawrence Choate, 
National President, B. S. A., Washington, D. C. ; 
and the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst. 

The Rev. W. R. Noe, Executive Secretary of 
the Diocese, stated that in his opinion this was 
the most helpful meeting of laymen that had been 
held in the Diocese in many years. Bishop Darst 
stated that it fulfilled a dream he had long had 
that he would be able to get together with a re- 
presentative body of laymen for the consideration 
of the Spread of Christ's Kingdom. 

It was the general concensus of opinion that 
the B. S. A. had found a definite place in the 
work of the Diocese, and under the leadership of 
Mr. C. McD. Davis, substantial increases will be 
shown in the work during the coming year. 



DIoeesae News 






A missionary who recently made a long journey 
into the interior of Brazil reported to the Bra- 
zilian Agency of the American Bible Society that 
at one place he met a man who purchased from 
a merchant one of the Society's seventy-four cent 
Portuguese Bibles but paid six dollars for it, so 
eager was he to own and read the book he had 
heard about but had never seen. 



Washington, N. C. 
The Rev. Stephen Gardner, Rector of St. Peter's 
Parish, will spend the summer months abroad. 
He will leave on June 14th on the "New Amster- 
dam" for London and will go from there to Paris, 
where he will join a party on June 29th for a trip 
to the Holy Land. He will return to his parish in 
September. During his absence the services and 
other work of the parish will be cared for by the 
Rev. William H. R. Jackson, a student in the The- 
ological Department of the University of the 
South. 

Wilmington, N. C. 
Rev. Ilbert deLacy Brayshaw, Assistant Rector 
of St. James' Parish, has been appointed Chaplain 
to the 252nd Coast Artiliery, Tractor Drawn, N. 
C. National Guard, which carries with it an ap- 
pointment to the Reserve Corps of the U. S. Army. 

Greenville, N. C. 

Work has been started on the Student Center, 
which will be provided by the Diocese of East 
Carolina for the use of the students at East Caro- 
lina College. This will be a part of the Parish 
House to be built by St. Paul's Parish, the Rev. 
W. A. Lillycrop, Rector. 

Beaufort, N. C. 

The Rev. Jean A. Vache, Rector of St. Paul's 
Parish, will assist Bishop Finlay in the operation 
of Kanuga Inn, Lake Kanuga, N. C. during the 
guest period in July and August. 

New Bern, N. C. 

At the initial meeting of the Committee on the 
proposed Hospital for Negroes, the following of- 
ficers were elected : Rev. Guy H. Madara, Rector 
of Christ Church, Chairman; Mr. E. K. Bishop, 
Senior Warden of Christ Church, Vice-Chairman ; 
Rev. R. I. Johnson, Rector of St. Cyprian's Church, 
Secretary; Rev. Walter R. Noe, Wilmington, 
Treasurer. Committees were then appointed on 
Site. Building, Finance, Incorporation, Name. The 
Committee will meet again on June 19th. 

Washington, N. C. 

The Y. P. S. L. Camp of the Diocese of East 
Carolina will be held at Camp Leach, about four 
miles East of here, June 30 to July 13. Courses 
will be given in Young People's Service League; 
Church's Program ; Prayer Book ; Life of Christ ; 
Personal Religion; Church Music; Parliamentary 
Law; Counsellors. The Rev. Ilbert deL. Bray- 
shaw, of Wilmington, is Director, and the Rev. 
Frank D. Dean, of Wilmington, Assistant. It is 
(Continued on pagre nine) 



THE MISSION HERALD 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



WHAT TO TAKE 



Subscription §1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent pel word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. 

OUR DIOCESAN CAMP 



THE future of the new diocesan camp, Camp 
Leach, depends largely on the first time it 
is used — this summer. It is hoped that the clergy 
and laity, especially the supervisors of the Y. P. 
S. L. and the C. S. S. L., in every parish and mis- 
sion, will do their utmost to have a representative 
group at the camp this summer. 

The site is truly a beautiful one, with a "sea 
shore" bathing beach of pure white sand, beauti- 
ful shaded walks, southern gray moss festooned 
trees, pine groves, a large level field for play — in 
fact, nearly everything to make a wonderful camp 
and conference center for the diocese. 

All modern conveniences have not been placed 
there as yet, but will be as soon as our people give 
their loyal support. We should all do everything 
possible to make this summer's camp a real suc- 
cess. 



SUMMER 



SUMMER is here. Many of our Church people 
will leave their parish Church for a vacation. 
A Aery important thing in planning one's vacation 
is to see. BEFORE ONE LEAVES, that every en- 
velope is properly filled and deposited with the 
treasurer, for the period of the vacation. This 
should be attended to before one leaves for his 
vacation. 

In the pleasure of planning a vacation and get- 
ting off, it is easy to forget that the expenses of 
the Church go on just the same. Fix up your 
envelopes before you pack your trunk. 



BESIDES your golf clubs, bathing suits and 
so on, what are you going to take on your va- 
cation? Or if you expect to take your vacation 
at home, are you planning to give all your atten- 
tion to the physical side of your life ? What about 
the mind and the soul? While giving your body 
special attention, why not give your mind and soul 
some special attention? 

There are excellent books to be had to take with 
you ; books on any phase of the Christian life you 
may be especially interested in: The EpiscopaL 
Church, its history, discipline, and worship, Pray- 
er, Faith, Conversion, Social Service, books of ali 
sorts on the Bible, its history, background and 
interpretation, sermons for adults and sermons 
for young people. What will you take besides 
your Bible and your Prayer Book? 



SUBSCRIPTIONS IN ARREARS 



TO maintain the second class mailing privileges 
given the Mission Herald by the Federaf. 
Government it is necessary that subscribers keep 
their subscriptions paid up. The Government al- 
lows a publication to mail a very limited number 
of free or unpaid copies each month. 

A report to the Government Post Office Depart- 
ment must be made in about thirty days regard- 
ing our mailing list. Before this report is made 
it will be necessary to drop from our subscription 
list the names of subscribers in arrears, unless 
same will be paid before the subscriber is in ai'- 
rears one year. 

It is hoped that our subscribers now in arrears 
will catch up during the month of June. The date 
of your subscription expiration shows either on 
the cover or on the wrapper. For example, ''Mrs. 
A. B. Blank. April 30" means that Mrs. Blank's 
subscription expired April 1930. SI. 00 must be 
sent in to The Mission Herald, Elizabeth City, N. 
C, to pay up and until April 1931. 

We hope for full cooperation in our endeavor 
to keep as large a subscription list as possible for 
our diocesan Church paper. 



For the fifth year in succession the American 
Bible Society is able to report an increase in the 
circulation of the Scriptures over that of the pre- 
ceding year. More than eleven million volumes 
of Bibles, Testaments and portions were circulat- 
ed by the Society in 1929. If the figures of the 
British and Foreign Bible Society and the Nation- 
al Bible Society of Scotland show a corresponding 
increase, the total circulation o f these three 
agencies for a single year will reach approximate- 
ly twenty-seven million copies. 



THE MISSION HERALD 



DIOCESAN NEWS 

(Continued on page seven) 

planned, if there are a sufficient number to war- 
rant such, to run two Junior Camps simultaneous- 
ly, boys and girls, 10 to 14. immediately following 
the Young People's Camp. 

Wilmington. N. C. 

At a recent meeting of the Trustees of St. Au- 
gustine's College, Raleigh, the Rev. W. R. Noe, 
Executive Secretary and Treasurer of the Diocese 
of East Carolina, was elected a member of the 
Executive Committee. 

New Bern, N. C. 

The Lenten Offering Banner has been won this 
year by St. Cyprian's Church School — the first 
time it has ever been won by a church school of 
the Colored Convocation since it was first offered 
several years ago. 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Mr. William G. Robertson, organist of St. 
James' Church, will have charge of the music at 
the Y. P. S. L. Conference at Lake Kanuga, June 
14-27. The Rev. W. R. Noe is a member of the 
faculty at this Conference. He is also Director 
of the Clergy Conference, to be held June 28-July 
11. 



Advaeee Work 

A BEAUTIFUL pattern of cooperation, edu- 
cation and enthusiasm is being woven by 
the give and take of Advance Work items through- 
out the Church. Mississippi is building a church 
in Haiti. Kentucky is erecting a building for 
Orleans, diocese of Sacramento, and doing some- 
thing else in Wuchang, China. South Dakota is 
putting up a building in Eastern Oregon and a 
church in Porto Rico. • Eastern Oregon is erecting 
a building in New Mexico. Northern Indiana is 
building a rectory in North Dakota. Western 
Michigan is providing a student center for Lub- 
bock, North Texas. Pennsylvania is doing many 
things, in Honolulu, East Carolina. Mexico, West- 
ern Nebraska, Wyoming, Oklahoma and Spokane. 
Arizona is helping with the girls' school in Haiti 
and putting up a rectory in Texas. Idaho is build- 
ing a parish house in Texas. The Woman's Aux- 
iliary of Albany is providing a residence for a 
catechist in Brazil. Erie is doing an item in its 
own diocese and two in the Philippines. San Joa- 
quin is building a church in Mississippi. Georgia 
and South Ohio are each building a chapel in 
Nevada ; Georgia is also repairing a rectory in the 
Virgin Islands, and Southern Ohio is also adding 
new wards to St. Luke's Hospital, Manila. South 



Carolina is erecting buildings in the district of 
Anking, China. Kansas is building a church at 
Odata in the Toboku district, Japan. Indianapolis 
and Atlanta are each putting up buildings in 
Alaska, and Atlanta is also helping with a school 
in Libera. Fond du Lac has a project somewhere. 
East Carolina is giving a residence in China, and 
in addition to this, the parish of St. James, Wil- 
mington, East Carolina, is providing a whole build- 
ing at the Voorhees School, for the American 
Church Institute for Negroes. 

The above items are incomplete and quite pos- 
sibly not all up to date in minor details, but the 
pattern is correct, and would be referred to in a 
school of design as a "discontinuous all-over." 



Yoer DaMifatteir 



YOU have one — a most precious possession — a 
sacred trust — a great responsibility. Why ? 
The Anglo Saxon people are great because they 
are a people of homes. The joy and stay of a. 
home is a mother. A country is made or de- 
stroyed by its ideals. The ideals of a country are 
controlled by women. 

"The world today needs as at no other time 
intelligent, cultured, Christlike, God-guided wo- 
men." 

It needs women of faith — -faith in themselves 
and faith in God. Faith in herself indicates that 
a woman has a glimpse of forces within her which 
either annihilate the obstacles in the way or make 
them seem insignificant in comparison with her 
ability to overcome them. Faith in God makes 
her life one triumphal march to the goal of her 
ambition. 

Faith is needed today. It is the prophet with- 
in us, the divine messenger appointed to accom- 
pany one through life to guide and direct and en- 
courage. Faith sees, recognizes the power that 
means accomplishment. It is a miracle worker, 
It looks beyond all boundaries, transcends all limi- 
tations, penetrates all obstacles and sees the goal. 

The world also needs today women who will 
keep the soul and mind responsive to beauty, 
which is a great refreshener, recuperator, life 
giver, health promoter. 

Beauty is a quality of divinity and to live much 
with the beautiful is to live close to the divine. 
"The more we see of beauty everywhere; in na- 
ture, in life, in man and child, in work and rest, 
in the outward and inward world, the more we 
see of God (good)." 

"Will your daughter be such a woman? Your 
home training has done much for her. The local 
school has helped. She graduated from high 
school and is now at the critical age. the age of 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



earnest and intelligent questioning and the next 
few years will fix her ideals and determine her 
character." 

Where Shall They be Sent? 

"Flora McDonald College was established and 
is maintained to help your daughter to a sane and 
safe conception of the call of today, lead her by 
precept and example to the fact of God — His love 
for us, His interest in us and His ability and will- 
ingness to help us build a worthy and worth- 
while life." 

The College is located in Red Springs, Robeson 
County, in the Diocese of East Carolina, a town 
on the Atlantic Coast Line Railway, twenty-five 
miles from Fayetteville, where direct connection 
is made with all points North and South. Red 
Springs, so called from the sulphur of its famous 
springs is in the longleaf pine section of the State 
and the climate is the same as that of the well- 
known resorts of Southern Pines and Pinehurst, 
about thirty-five miles distant. The town is com- 
posed of people who have gathered together large- 
ly on account of the social and intellectual advan- 
tages offered by the College and who desire a 
thorough education for their children. It is an 
exceptionally clean town both physically and 
morally. 

The College is distinctly Christian and the de- 
velopment of Christian character is the chief aim. 
It was founded by the Scotch Presbyterians for 
the purpose of offering to young women the best 
educational advantages, coupled with positive 
Christian instruction and training. The faculty 
is selected not only for scholarship, but especially 
for sympathetic co-operation in the carrying out 
of this purpose. 

It will not cost much, about $97.50 per quarter 
for boarding pupils, according to the Catalogue, 
to send your daughter to Flora MacDonald and it 
is our hope that a large number of our girls will 
attend. It will mean much to our Church there 
to have them, and it will mean even more to the 
girls to spend a few years in this CHRISTIAN 
atmosphere. 



PRAYER LEAFLET 



THE Division for Rural Work of the Depart- 
ment of Christian Social Service has just 
issued a leaflet entitled "Prayers for Rural Life 
and Work." 

The leaflet contains a Litany for the Church's 
work in rural fields, appropriate hymns and fif- 
teen prayers for special objects. Titles of prayers 
includes those for "Vision and Zeal in Rural Work" 
"Those who Sow and Reap," "The Isolated," the 
prayer of the Rural Fellowship, and many others 
of similar character. 



The leaflet is the exact size of the regular 
Prayer Book and is easy to carry and handle. The 
Division for Rural Work trusts that the Prayers 
will be used in private devotions, meetings of or- 
ganizations and in the services of the Church as 
opportunity and the Bishop's consent permit. 

Thanks partly to the generosity of certain in- 
dividuals, copies of the leaflet will be distributed 
gratis to all who wish them. Address The Book 
Store, Church Missions House. 218 Fourth Ave- 
nue. New York City. 



ST. AUGUSTINE'S COLLEGE, ENGLAND 

ON July 5th, the Bishops at Lambeth are to 
visit Canterbury and they will have lunch 
at St. Augustine's College. St. Augustine's is 
a college for the training of missionary clergy. 
It has about sixty students. There are 74 gradu- 
ates or former students now at work in 19 dioceses 
in Africa ; in 23 North and South American dio- 
ceses, excluding the United States, there are 83 
men variously scattered from Newfoundland to 
the Argentine ; there are 34 men in 17 dioceses 
in Asia, from Bombay to Seoul ; 54 men in 22 
Australian dioceses, and 2 in the diocese of Gi- 
braltar. 

The Warden, the Rev. J. W. S. Tomlin, writes: 
"We have a map of the world in our gateway be- 
sprinkled with little flags. These flags mark the 
places where Augustinians are working. Far to 
the north in Arctic Alaska, on the shores of the 
Behring Straits, a single flag bravely holds its 
own. The man indicated by that flag is Arch- 
deacon Goodman, and he ministers to a thousand 
Esquimeaux in that bleak and inhospitable region. 

"Last term we were visited by another Augus- 
tinian, the Rev. S. Lawton, who is playing almost 
as lonely a game along the coast of Labrador . . . 
During my stay in Australia I had many talks 
with the Rev. Ernest Gribble, who has been a 
great pioneer of missions to the Australian ab- 
originals ; and only last week I had a letter from 
the young lay mail who has just completed a so- 
journ of three years on the lonely, wind-swept 
island of Tristan da Cunha. 

"I have lately been reading the life of Bishop 
Stirling, who did such heroic work amongst the 
Fuegians on the stormy coasts round Cape Horn, 
a polished English gentleman giving himself in 
humble service to men who were considered by 
some utterly beyond the reach of saving grace. 
Add to these the men who. since the days of Fath- 
er Damien, have ministered to lepers in various 
parts of the world, and without going farther you 
have gained a powerful apologetic for the Christi- 
an faith. 

"From a worldly standpoint there is no justi- 



THE MISSION HERALD 



It 



fication for this expenditure of strength on people 
whose welfare cannot make any appreciable dif- 
ference to the cause of civilization. A rational 
husbanding of man power would lead to the with- 
drawal of these splendid men from their outposts, 
to strengthen the undermanned missions i n 
Africa, India or China. 

"But from, a Christian standpoint this flaming 
faith in the value of every soul, this evidence that 
Christ died literally for all men, this pouring out 
of precious nard puts to rout every captious criti- 
cism about the power of the Gospel. Is there any 
motive but that inspired by Christ, strong enough 
to drive men to such work?" 



MAY AT THE THOMPSON ORPHANAGE 



School Promotion 

The month of May marks the closing of the 
School Year, and we are glad to report that prac- 
tically all of our children were promoted, some 
of them with excellent marks. One boy gradu- 
ated from Central High School, and has already 
obtained a job with the Southern Public Utilities 
Co. Five of our girls are graduating from nurses 
training schools, one from St. Peter's, Charlotte, 
one from Vance County Hospital, Henderson, and 
three from the Episcopal Ear, Eye and Throat 
Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

One of our boys was elected Captain of the Cen- 
tral High School Track Team for next year. As 
our children attend the city schools we find that 
it is better for them to participate in the physical 
education courses as provided by the recreational 
directors of the several schools rather than main- 
tain our own athletic department. 

Our older children attend Sunday School at 
St. Peter's and after Commencement held Sunday, 
June 1, the following children won prizes and 
certificates for good work: Prizes — Mavis Har- 
rell, Floy Lee Brady, Tom Myers, George Powell. 
Kathleen Kissiah, Elizabeth Jones, Lucile Vincent, 
Oscar Gatlin, Wade Webb, Harry Potts, Edward 
Haislip, Paul Keever, Paul Harrell. Certificates- — 
Susie Hopson, Ella Louise Owens, Lydia Elliott, 
Gerelene Muse, Sadie Cahoon, Roslea Goodrich, 
Mai Guffey, Winifred Guffey, Vivian Phillips, Rosa 
Duffy, Mabel Smith, Fred McKee and J. D. Powell. 

A very fine oil painting, a copy of Rafael's Ma- 
donna, was recently received, a gift of Rev. Dr. 
Alburtis Hunter of Raleigh. This picture has 
been very much admired by everyone. Good pic- 
tures are a wonderful help in the training of the 
children. 

A good friend of the Orphanage has recently 



offered a prize of five dollars to the boy of the 
Scout Troup making the best bird house. We are 
especially grateful for this prize as we believe 
every boy and girl in our land should be taught 
the care and protection of our bird life. The 
menace from the insect world is yearly becoming 
more alarming. 



Ride 'Em Cowboy 

(Taken from the Connie Maxwell Paper) 
I used to think that there might be some chance 
of getting our Government interested in the child- 
ren, but'that was hoping too much. Being a ranch- 
man and farmer and also a child owner, I have 
wished that when one of my children got sick 
I could wire or call up some Government expert 
and have him come look after them, like I can 
do if one of my cows, or pigs get some disease. 

Course children are a lot of trouble, but we just 
don't seem to be smart enough to find something' 
that would be less thouble that would replace 
them. 

That's the only thing we are shy now is syn- 
thetic children. 

It's not a bad idea whoever thought of doing 
something for the children. 

If it works and you improve them, I will send 
you mine. 

Yours, 

WILL ROGERS. 

IN MEMORIAM 



Mrs. Robert Strange 

It has pleased Almighty God, in His infinite 
wisdom and love to call to a higher sphere of life 
and service, our beloved member of the Auxiliary 
of St. John's. She has passed into the nearer 
presence of her King. 

Mrs. Strange, affectionately known as "Miss 
Daisy" was the efficient custodian of the United 
Offering for many years. 

In appreciation of her beautiful Christian in- 
fluence, we extend to her family our heart-felt 
sympathy, praying that God may bless and com- 
fort them. 

Resolved,- that a copy of these resolutions be 
sent to the family, and recorded in the minutes 
of the Auxiliary. 

JANIE K. ROBINSON, 
PEARLE H. WAREN, 
ALICE S. HAIGH, 

Committee 



THE MISSION HERALD 



jf* 



Womae 9 § Auxiliary 

Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, X. C. 
Publicity Chairman 



OOOdQMAfitoAAAAAMAAu 



REPORT TO THE CONVENTION 

Eight Reverend Father in God: 

We respectfully submit this report of the work 
of the Woman's Auxiliary in East Carolina for 
the year 1929. You will find the report shows 
progress in several ways, particularly* in the 
growth of Christian Social Service and in the 
greater interest which has been shown in the 
work of the entire Church. Although the finan- 
cial depression was felt in many parts of the 
Diocese, the work of the women was not severely 
handicapped and the Convocation of Wilmington 
went ahead of last year $497.57. The work which 
you gave us to do amounting to §2,500.00 was 
completed early in the year, the Provincial and 
National Auxiliary pledges were paid and much 
additional work accomplished. The work is di- 
vided into the Five Fields of service as follows : 

Parish $ 9,841.79 

Community .. 1.968.81 

Diocese 3,849.68 

Nation 485.95 

World 1.035.90 

Total .. ..$17,182.13 

The Bishop's Fund was $777.80. The United 
Thank Offering was S4.693.81. The Supply work 
was $2,570.79, which included the national boxes 
as well as the clothing of the East Carolina child- 
ren at the Thompson Oi-phanage. In addition to 
this work and the regular contributions that the 
women make through their envelopes, many wo- 
men are working steadily to pay quota for their 
Parish. 

Through consistant effort on the part of the 
two convocation^] presidents the book on "The 
General Program" has been distributed and used. 
The program has been much more generally dis- 
cussed as a result and both Mrs. Adams and Mrs. 
.Shelburne feel that in many of the places, the world 
vision has become a much more familiar thing. 
Several Parishes, however, which have accom- 
plished fine mission work in the past will have to 
guard against becoming absorbed in Parish work. 
In every case of this kind it is because of heavy 
expense. The small parishes and missions, in 
doing their Auxiliary work still keep in the lead. 
fulfilling every obligation that comes to them. 
They lack the leadership of resident clergy and 
'hey carry out the Auxiliary program with fine 



enthusiasm as it supplies them with programs, 
etc. Summer meetings were increased and with 
more encouragement will go ahead still more. 
Missionary programs featured this summer at 
meetings in a number of places. There are seven- 
teen hundred and thirty-six women who are reg- 
istered in 1929 in the women's work of the Dio- 
cese. There are eight hundred and sixty-eight 
women who are the loyal band who accomplish 
the major part of .the work. If the district or- 
ganization could be perfected and the meetings 
held regularly it would probably increase the in- 
terest. It would be a forwart step in the Auxili- 
ary work. 

In a number of parishes in the Diocese a reor- 
ganization is advisable. Too often there are wo- 
men who are out of touch with the work and see 
no special place for them in the old arrangement 
and there are many who have never been connect- 
ed with the Church work in any way. In some 
places, organizations with much too large mem- 
bership give very little opportunity to the indi- 
vidual member for service. But these organi- 
zations will be the excuse for not doing more 
active work. 

The group, branch or circle plan of the Auxili- 
ary is working splendidly in an increasing number 
of parishes. If a change is made, a survey of 
every parish is advisable then a division into 
groups which have their own meetings each week 
with a general meeting once a month. The groups 
can be made according to age. Some places there 
could be a new business woman's branch, or a 
college group, or a young girl's branch. There 
can even be a branch among the old or shut-in 
women who can be made to feel that they are 
also doing important work. 

There are several branches of business women 
who are djing perfectly splendid work and the 
same thing can be true even in the smallest mis- 
sions with only two or three women who can not 
meet when the others do. 

The mission work continues to hold first place. 
The Corporate Gift which the women of the whole 
Church have given each year will now be discon- 
tinued and the women in every Diocese will take 
their share of the Advance work program. This 
means that the Auxiliary should work closer to 
the Diocesan Departments, particularly in Edu- 
cational work. To get the greatest benefit from 
this arrangement, the women's work should be 
planned and linked definitely first to the Diocesan 
Program and then to the Parish program. We 
have already found that the Auxiliary program 
which is published in September is of the greatest 
possible help and where there is no resident clergy- 
man, it is of inestimable value. We still have a 



THE MISSION HERALD 



13 



co-ordinating committee which has never funct- 
ioned. The Educational Department reports fine 
study classes and Bible Studies program meetings. 
The books studies were: "Following Christ", 
"Roads to the City of God", "Spiritual Adventur- 
ing", "The New Africa", and church periodicals, 
and the Church's program. The distribution of 
Church Kalendars and Daily Bible Readings have 
increased. 

We are trying to do something towards the 
education of young people for the Service of Christ 
at home and abroad. We are carrying two scholar- 
ships, one at St. Mary's and one at the Bishop 
Tuttle Training School at St. Augustine's. This 
is the last year that Inez Middleton has at St. 
Augustine's and we feel that she has benefitted 
herself greatly and will be able to do fine work 
as soon as she has finished. Voluntray contribu- 
tions have been made to the Student work at the 
University of North Carolina, North Carolina Col- 
lege for Women. During the Summer a fund of 
§315.50 was raised for the Student Secretary's 
work at the East Carolina College for Women. 

Miss Weatherly, whose work at Lake Phelps 
has been of especial interest to the Auxiliary was 
sent to St. Faith's Training School in New York 
for a period of study and preparation. She is 
very grateful. Miss Mae Bonner, an East Caro- 
lina girl, who has a scholarship at the Deaconess 
Training School in Philadelphia, was also assisted 
and the Auxiliary will see her through her term 
of work. Miss Bonner goes into the Pennsyl- 
vania Hospital for training as a nurse in Septem- 
ber. $300.00 was given the Diocese for the salary 
of a Young People's Field Secretary. 

The weakest part of the year's work is that 
we have such a small number of representatives 
at summer conferences. There were only two 
from the convocation of Wilmington and none 
from the convocation of Edenton. It is hoped that 
we can strengthen our line this year at this point. 
It would not be too high a goal to set to try to 
send some one from every single parish. 

There are forty six active committees doing 
Christian Social Service in their parishes, com- 
munities and in the Diocese. Many of them have 
become definitely linked up with other Commun- 
ions in this work and many of them with Social 
Service Agencies. We do not attempt to measure 
this work in dollars and cents. Some of it is 
reported as community work and there has been 
a splendid growth of the knowledge of the Spirit 
in which this work should be undertaken. 

You will be interested in a survey of one County 
which was used as a demonstration point by the 
chaimian of Rural work. Of the 530 families 
surveyed, 1320 persons were church members, 239 



never attended any church, 817 were non-church 
members, 1237 attend Sunday School but 719 do 
not. This is by no means an unusual county. 
This committee has been discouraged by a lack 
of interest and cooperation of the church people 
who are privileged themselves and of many of 
the Clergy. 

An effort was made to enlarge the usefulness 
of the Mission Herald and the Spirit of Missions 
to the women of the Diocese. The former carried 
more Auxiliary news than previously and the 
chairman hopes to make it more interesting all 
the time and to make it a reference paper for all 
the women's organizations. 

The Field Chairman brought the Report of the 
Committee on Evangelism and Personal Religion 
to the Triennial meeting, vividly before the women 
through letters on Ministry of Books, of Prayer, 
of the Spoken Work, of the Holy Communion, of 
Example and of Service. The Findings of the 
Triennial meeting formed the basis of the years 
program and every single phase of the work was 
emphasized at some time. 

More interest has been manifested in the Church 
Periodical Club but the Director has reports from 
only eight parishes. This branch of work ought 
to become a part of every parish's activities. 

The Auxiliary asks for your support for the 
following work during 1930 : We plan to make an 
effort to enlist and train more young women for 
service in the Church, in the mission ,field and in 
the Auxiliary. We plan also to try to enlist many 
women who have become lukewarm or who are out 
of touch with the Church to take part again in 
some branch of the work. 

We believe that through a better organization 
of the Districts and more frequent meetings that 
progress can be made in the two things mentioned 
above. We believe that this would also be pro- 
ductive of developing leadership, of presenting 
opportunities of individual service and of increas- 
ing the knowledge of the Program of the Whole 
Church. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JANIE WILLIAMS MacMILLAN 



Philadelphia, Pa., 
708 Spruce St., 
April 5, 1930. 
Dear Mrs. MacMillan : 

Deaconess Stewart has just given me your card. 
I appreciate your interest. You asked me if I 
would go as a missionary nurse, that is what I 
hope to do. I have been in touch with the Board 
of Missions for three years and in February of 
this year I sent in my application blank. I also 
passed the physical examination they require, but 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



I will not be appointed until 1 am trained either 
as a teacher or nurse, as you know I have chosen 
the nurses training. 

I will be deeply grateful to the women of the 
Diocese if they would help me with my training 
as a nurse. 

Very sincerely, 

MAE V. BONNER 

CHURCH PERIODICAL CLUB 

QUITE a number of branches are sending in 
names of newly appointed Secretaries for 
the Church Periodical Club Work, and it is very 
gratifying indeed to see interest in the work pick- 
ing up to such an extent. The tendency in the 
work seems to be leaning towards giving in bulk, 
that is, confining contributions of magazines, 
books, etc., to jails and institutions and while that 
is fine, and a worthy and a necessary part of the 
work, is is not the sole or prime purpose of the 
Church Periodical Club. In this month's letters 
from Headquarters an appeal is made to all C. P. 
C. workers, not to neglect the work of sending on 
magazines as we finish with them, or of providing 
new subscriptions to good magazines for Church 
institutions, missionaries, as well as individuals. 
The letter says: "Quantity gifts to institutions 
are more valuable than we shall ever know, but 
they cannot take the place of the personal sending 
from individual to individual." 

Let me again make a plea for contributions of 
cash to buy some Missionary Hymnals for use in 
the student work at East Carolina Teachers' Col- 
lege, at Greenville. If every branch would send 
in a small contribution, the job would be accomp- 
lished ! Here is a suggestion: Suppose a little 
book guessing or library party, or silver tea be 
given for this purpose and the proceeds sent to 
me, so that we can buy the Hymnals for the girls 
to use in their meetings. 

Sincerely yours, 

MRS. J. P. WATTERS, Director, 

Edenton, N. C. 



WORKERS WANTED 

Every Church Woman in the United States — 

Please Read. 

THE District of Kiangsu, China, is attempt- 
ing a very difficult thing. Will you help? 
We are appealing for ten educated young Chi- 
nese women to organize evangelistic work among 
their own countrywomen. Only so can the multi- 
tudes of Chinese women be reached — women 



working in the fields or washing clothes in the 
courtyards, women raising Silkworms or working 
in modern mills, women learning banking or 
teaching school — with all the old principles swept 
away by the revolution, with an amazing gift of 
freedom poured over their heads and no knowledge 
of good to show them the perfect law of liberty. 
We are appealing for ten Chinese girls, but for 
that we must have ten American girls to kindle 
the fire. 

There are many educated Chinese girls who are 
devoted Christians, loyal, hard-working and self- 
sacrificing, capable also and very charming. But 
they have had no experience of initiating me- 
thods, of organizing forces. Now and for many 
years to come they will doubtless do only the same 
kind of work they see done by others. The first 
thing needed therefore is to show these girls the 
possibilities open to them in the way of evangelis- 
tic achievement. 

American women have a priceless inheritance 
in their knowledge of their own power of ac- 
complishment when they bind themselves together 
heart and soul to do a thing. Suffrage is ours, 
prohibition is ours. There may be a hundred 
different opinions as to the value of prohibition to 
the United States. There can be no question as to 
the agency which brought it about. The women 
did it — because they believed in it. Now we believe 
in God more than we, or our mothers, ever believed 
in suffrage or prohibition. Causes are only causes 
but God is the Author of all good. The victory of 
the anti-opium movement and other social work 
in the future of this great land of China will be a 
by-product of the first essential achievement, the 
making known to the women of the country of the 
nature and the strength of the Holy Spirit. As 
God has worked through women in the past, so it 
is our privilege to reveal Him as working through 
us in China now. We have our Master's promise 
for the success of our work : "The gates- of hell 
shall not prevail against it," gates, you see, not 
armies, solid, inert barriers of pride and ignorance 
and selfishness, waiting for the attack. The task 
is gigantic, but God through history has given to 
the women of our nation the gift of faith. This 
faith we are now asked to share with the women 
of China. 

Tt is interesting to note that ever since the 
nationalist movement has brought about such a 
wave of patriotism throughout China, the most 
thoughtful of the Chinese clergy are still urging 
foreign missionaries to come to China and throw 
their energy and experience into the almost over- 
whelming job of evangelizing the great mass of 
the Chinese people. No talent, natural or acquired 
will be wasted here, normal training or business 



THE MISSION HERALD 



15 



equipment, love of literature or skill in music, 
public persuasiveness or a gift of friendship, ex- 
perience in promoting clubs or managing children. 
Much has already been accomplished — the pres- 
ence of educated Christian girls in the Church 
now is proof enough of this. But there have been 
too few workers to allow of the joyful enthusiasm 
which comes from corporate action. We want the 
Chinese girls to know this enthusiasm. We must 
first show it to them in operation. In city and 
country, among educated and uneducated women, 
there is no end to the development possible in 
this work — interesting outsiders to desire this 
new thing, teaching those who have came to desire 
it. It all depends upon whether you will come and 
help us. 

Ten Chinese girls, ten American girls — -shall 



we get them? If you cannot come yourself, will 
you pray that others may come? 

If you would like to hear further details of this 
work, write to Dr. John W. Wood, at the Church 
Missions House, 281 Fourth Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. He will be glad to answer all your inquiries. 

Lord of the Vineyard in Thy mercy 
receive now our prayer for Thy work 
among Chinese women in the District 
of Shanghai. Have respect to their great 
need, we beseech Thee, and send them 
twenty new workers, if this be Thy will, 
ten Chinese and ten Americans, such as 
Thou hast chosen. Through Jesus Christ 
Our Lord. Amen. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Statement of Amounts Paid on Apportionments for the Church's Program — Diocesan 

and General to June 2, 1930 



Location 



Parish Apportionment 

PARISHES 

Atkinson. St. Thomas' $ 100.00 

Ayden, St. James' - 320.00 

Aurora, Holy Cross 500.00 

Bath, St. Thomas' - 100.00 

Beaufort,. St. Paul's ... 600.00 

Belhaven, St. James' 500.00 

Bonnerlon, St. John's .. 100.00 

Chocowinity, Trinity . .. .. 100.00 

Clinton. St. Paul's 400.00 

Creswell, St. David's 700.00 

Edenton, St. Paul's 2,500.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 2,000.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 400.00 

Payetteville, St. John's 3,300.00 



Fayetteville, St. Joseph's 
Gatesville, St. Mary's 
Goldsboro, St. Stephen's .. - 
Greenville, St. Paul's . ..._ 
Griflon. St. John's 
Hamilton, St. Martin's 
Hertford, Holy Trinity 
Hope Mills. Christ Church 
Jessama, Zion ... 



200.00 

200.00 

1.200.00 

1,500.00 

250.00 

100.00 

1,000.00 

150.00 

125.00 



Paid by 
Parishes & 
:h. Schools 

$ 8.35 

24.35 
56.00 
26.50 

216.80 

197.15 
23.00 
13.65 
36.07 

111.07 
1,317.30 

747.18 
16.00 

922.64 
51.00 
14.20 

300.00 

840.30 



Due to 
June 1st 

S 33.30 

108.95 

152.30 

15.15 

33.20 

11.15 

18.65 

28.00 

130.58 

180.58 

86.12 
150.65 
452.36 

32.24 

69.10 

200.00 



Kinston, St. Mary's 1,800.00 

Lake Landine. St. George's 125. op 

New Bern, Christ Church 3.000.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 400.00 

Plymouth, Grace Church 400.00 

Red Spring's, St. Stephen's .... ....... 100.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 350.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' . 240.00 

Southport, St. Philip's 250.00 

Vap.ceboro, St. Paul's 50.00 

Washington, St. Peter's 3,500.00 

Williamston. Advent . 300.00 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd . 300.00 

Wilmington. Si. James'.. ... 13,380.00 

Wilmington St. John's 3,000.00 

Wilmingtoi, St. Mark's 200.00 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 2,000.00 

Windsor, St Thomas' 600.00 

Winton, St. John's 200.00 

Woodville, Grace Church 500.00 



Belhaven, St. Mary's 
Burgaw, St. Mary's . 



ORGANIZED MISSIONS 
_. _. 105.00 

100.00 



50.00 
175.00 

16.30 

67.12 
200.00 

98.88 
647.25 
254.91 
100.00 

30.00 
133.70 

4G.70 

7.50 

1.401.12 

25.07 

320.53 

4,604.62 

1,150.01 

172.75 

■ 273.47 

53.20 

67.13 



14.00 
33.40 



101.15 

241.65 
46.20 

550.00 

602.75 

66.65 
11.65 
9.30 
100.00 
57.45 
13.30 

99.93 

970.38 

99.99 

557.83 

196.80 

83.30 

141.17 





300.00 

150.00 

25.00 


50.00 
67.50 
8.80 


75.00 


Edenton, St. John-Evangelist 




Elizabeth City, St. Philips' 


1.65 


Fairfield, AH Saint's 


20.00 
50.00 


20.00 




Faison, St. Gabriel's 


20 80 


Goldsboro, St. Andrew's . 


100.00 




41.65 


Kinston, St. Augustine's .. 


50.00 

100.00 

25.00 

70.00 


35.00 
51.32 




Lumberton, Trinity ... 




Maxton, St. Matthew's 


10 45 


Morehead City, St. Andrew's 


22.42 


6.73 


North West, All Souls' 


50.00 




20.80 


Oriental, St. Thomas' 


10.00 
50.00 

125.00 
30.00 

200.00 


10.00 






20.80 


Roxobel, St. Mark's .. 


65.10 
30.00 
25.00 


Sladesville. St. John's 




Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' .. 


58.30 


Sunburv, St. Peter's 


75.00 

60.00 

125.00 




31 25 


Swan Quarter, Calvary 




25 00 


Trenlon, Grace Church 


64.40 






40.00 




16 65 




150.00 


50 00 


12.50 

37.50 


Whiteville, Grace Church ... 


90.00 




Winterville, St. Luke's 


200.00 
100.00 


106.00 
51.01 








Yeatcsville, St- Matthew's 


100.00 
ED MISSIONS 


50.00 




UNORGANIZ 




Aurora, St. Jude's 


50.00 




20.80 




100.00 


25.15 


16.50 


Beaufort, St. Clement's 


40.00 


11.00 


5.65 




50.00 




20. 8<* 


Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's .._ 
Jasper, St. Thomas' ... 


65.00 




29.10 


50.00 


17.53 


3.27 




50.00 


8.00 


12.80 


Pollocksville, Mission 


48.00 


7.90 


12.10 


Robersonville, Mission . 


25.00 




10.45 


Roper, St. Ann's ... 


25.00 


3.11 


7.34 


Wiliiamston, St. Ignatius' .... 


30.00 


14.65 




Wilmington, "Brooklyn'', Mission 


15.90 


10.00 


. 




20.00 


10.00 




PAROCHIAL 


MISSIONS 






Campbelton, St. Phillip's 


100.00 




41.65 


Kinston, Christ Church _ — 


50.00 


30.00 




45.00 


13.00 


5.75 


Total Apportionments — 1930 


S 50 


303.00 




Amount due to June 1st — 5 month 
Paid by Parishes, Missions and Chu 




$ 


20,959.60 


rch Schools 




15.785.17 


Balance due to June 1st .. 


5,174.45 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



-*. -* -.. ♦. J. -♦ - -*^ .*...*- -*- -•--♦--♦- -'tAAAAA/i .*♦■»*»»*»-•*•-.*»-***♦.»*»-•** -^- -♦■--♦- -♦ a ,*- .*- . ♦-..♦.. -♦- -♦ --♦- -♦- - ♦^-.♦- -♦..-♦, ..* . -*. .*_ .*. .•_ -». ^*. .*. .*. -•- -*--*- .*- .*. .«. -»- -». -*. .♦. _«. .*. .*- .*- .*- - ^, .*- -•- -♦- .*. .*- _«. -*- -*. -*- _»- -♦. 



Virginia 
Episcopal School 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 

Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
lege and University. Modern 
equipment. Healthy location in 
the mountains of Virginia. Cost 
moderate, made possible through 
generosity of founders. For cat- 
alogue apply to 

Rev. Wm. G. Pendleton, 
D. D., Rector 



| 



r ..... T 



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Church Furnishings 

Gold, Silver and Brass 

Church and Chancel 
Furniture 

Write for Catalogue for 
Episcopal Churches. 

W. & E. Schmidt Co. 

308 Third Street 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



THE 

Bank of Edenton 

SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 
Bank With Us By Mail 

JULIAN WOOD, President. 
W. O. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



CHURCH VESTMENTS 

Cassocks, Surplices. Stoles 

Embroideries. Clerical Suits, 
Silks, Cloths. Fringes 

HATS, RABATS. COLLARS 

Cox Sons & Vining 

131-133 East 23rd Street 
New York 



NORFOLK-SOUTHERN 

Passenger Schedules 
Effective December 29, 1929. via Norfolk 
Southern Railroad. Elizabeth City. N. C. 
!.v. 12:15 P. M.— Raleigh, New Bern, Golds- 
boro, Beaufort and inter- 
mediate points. 

Lv. 10:25 P. M.- Raleigh, New Bern. GoWe- 
boro, Beaufort. Charlotte 
l'ayetteville and intermed- 
iate points. Sleeper to Ra- 
leigh and New Bern. 

Lv. 5:50 A. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. 

I.v. 2:50 P. M.- Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Connections North 
and West. 
For further information, reservations, etc 
■pply to 

J. H. TUCKER, Ticket Atrt 

Elisabeth Oitj, N. < - 




5 

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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 
AND JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter receive her 
education in a church sehool. 

Rev. Warren W. Way. A.M., D.D.. Rector 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 years' college 
work all fully accredited by the Southen Association. Also 
Courses in Music, Art, Expression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. Indoor 
Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback Riding. 

.For Catalogue and View Book address 
A. W. Tucker, Business Manager 






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\TH AVE Si '.i< lO'i SINEVYO 



IHaflpi 



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IN CARVED WOOD AND ISi 
AIARBI.EBRASSSILVEB. 
FABRICS + WINDOWS \\\J 



The Ideal Place for a Day's Outing or a Summer Vacation 

BAYVIEW— ON-THE-PAMLICO 

19 Miles Below Washington. N. C. 

Splendid Hotel Facilities. Excellent Cuisine. Well Furn- 
ished Rooms. Moderate Rates. 
A FINE BATHING BEACH 
An ideal place to bring the children, where they can wade 

and bathe in perfect safety. 
Spend some time at Bayview while your children are at 

Camp Leach; they are only a few miles apart 
FINEST DANCE FLOOR IN EASTERN CAROLINA 
Boats for fishing or sailing parties. Make your plans now 

to visit Bayview this Summer. 
Season opens June 6. For Hotel Reservations, Address 

THE BAYVIEW HOTEL, BATH, N. C. 



IS PRINTED BY THE 

Franklin Point Shop 



P 



ARTICULAR 

RINTKRS 



& Colonial Avenue 



Elizabeth City, N. C. 



!^^***'*****t*******^**t' M C**«*****I**I****** , *I**I**I**2**4 



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Library U. of N. C. , 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Jan. '23 



& c 




V 




V 





2 THE MISSION HERAL D 

JULY- AUGUST INDEX »**««**+»+*»«W«**«4*««+»*««*»««+»+»«+m 

X - *** 

A Minister's Compensation 3 J VKR8@^{\@lfflfl^B I 

St. Mary's School 4 f , p „ Is WEATHERLY>S CAM ^ IT Is G00D | 

J. Q. Beckwith, Jr. Ordained .5 V w . H. WEATHRHLY * COMPANY I 

Thompson Orphanage 6 j ELIZABETH CITY, N C. ? 

X T 

Contributions to Orphanage 7 >X~HK~:"XKK~:«:~X^«:^^ 

Delgado Mission „_ ^.-. 7 

-,, , ~, , _ ♦**^~x^x~x~x~x~xk~x~x^~xk~xk~x^x^^^ 

Church Grounds 7 | ZOELLER'S STUDIO | 

Editorials 8 % Elizabeth city. n. c. % 

y Photographs anything, anywhere, anytime, day or nirht, & 

Dr. Disosway on Leave 8 2 dead or ■"*« ♦ 

A Send Us Your Kodak Films— We Give 24 X 

Evangelism 8 J Hours Service £ 

Liberian Prophet 9 ♦*« m> *<^>><^">><~X~X~xkk~xk^^^ 

Persia Today 9 

Christian School in Persia 10 f H. WEIL & BROS. ! 

Japan and Beauty 11 X Goldsboro, N. C. f 

Is a Poor House Needed? 11 j* S 

Church School by Mail 11 I S P ecialists in a PP arel for Men, Women and Children | 

<K~X~X~X~X~X~XK~XK~XKKK«X<KKK~XK~X~X~X^X» 

Near East 12 

Mexico : 13 <kk~xk~xk-"XKK~x~xkk~xkkk~x~x^ 

Philippine Islands 13 | W. B. THORPE & CO. | 

Liberia 13 g Wilmington, N. C. | 

Chinese Mission 14 t Coal and Building Material I 

Chinese Mission i* x 1<CALL QN ug „ ^ 

Worshipping 14 »<. < ■,» ♦» < ■«<■ . > x>»<-x-x^x-x-x-x-x-x->x-:-x-x-x 

Woman's Auxiliary — 

•xkk~x~x~xkkk~x~x~xk~>xk~xkkkk^^^x><*«^ 

Letter from Executive Secretary ..14 X When in Eli2abet h City, N. C. | 

Church Periodical Club 14 y* CALL ON | 

„ , „ . 1K ? First and Citizens National Bank x 

Book Review .15 x They wiU be glad to serve you | 

Financial Statement 15 X RESOURCES OVER FOUR MILLION DOLLARS $ 

PINELAND JUNIOR COLLEGE 

c, , , » T .. r, i- *<KKK~XKKK~XKK~XK^XKK«XK<K~XKKKKK~X»<~X~X« 

Salemburg, North Carolina a .:. 

Two years of State Accredited College Work ? We take pleasure in 8elHn « Book «- ^ »• <!<•<*• X 

y you on your needs or wishes. ♦ 

Piano, Voice, Art, Expression, Domestic Science, x •£ 

Bible and Commercial Course X p - w - MELICK Co. X 

Also a well equipped high school and elementary X Elizabeth city. n. c. ^ 

boarding school for little girls. •*—**—<»— *————— ————** 

Inter-Denominational *— ******•+**•*•**#——*+*—— — 

Christian Influences Throughout y ^^flflH MBH^kw 5 

Healthful Surroundings ^^ Wfm^ ^W 

Also splendid School lor growing girls and Young X A aP^itlUlP^^Vj jifc^lm 

Women — Inexpensive Rates tn*v~S2M& B^rlffitlWl'Q^iBk 

Write ns before deciding where to send your X Bpvl^Tj I f\ CiWzJa0ffi?R m 

daughter school. ^H ■ 1 1 Wl2flaH>S%UiHLfi W 

Salemburg, North Carolina j; ^^i fa3wafflfflJ!lv5£M P^ f 

<~X~XKKK"X~XKKK~XKKK"XKK~X"X"XKK"XK«<KKK~> ^♦<KK'<«XKK~X^XKKKKK~XK«X"X~X~XKKK~X«»X~X» 



The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, JULY-AUGUST, 1930 



No. 7 



A Mielsteir 9 § Compeesatioe 

1 Tim. W-6 — "// thou put the brethren in mind of these 
things thou shalt be a good minister of Jesus Christ." 

TWENTY YEARS in the ministry ; in prospect 
twenty years seems a long time, but in retro- 
spect the years have fairly flown. They have been 
years packed full of the goodness of God with just 
enough of discouragement to make a man realize 
his dependence upon God. Twenty years of friend- 
ship with those who under God are trying to make 
the world a little better, nobler and happier. 
Twenty years of delving into the great truths 
upon which civilization and religion rest. Twenty 
years of service with God in carrying out the 
great purpose He has in mind for men. 

Surely a minister must feel that a life spent in 
this way is a life well spent. It will carry with 
it an influence which will be felt long years after 
the minister himself has gone to the great beyond. 
He is in the service of the greatest of all profes- 
sions. He works at the springs of character and 
hammers at the foundations of life. He grasps 
humanity and toils upward with it toward heaven. 
He stands in populous cities and in waste places, 
in the towns and the jungles and brings a reve- 
lation of God. 

1. What compensation does a minister's life 
bring? Let us first look at the Godward side. A 
minister is in close partnership with Jesus Christ. 
His life is along the same lines as His who came 
to reveal the heart of God to suffering and sinning 
humanity. Christ's great commission to the Apos- 
tolic band was "as ye go, preach." They were to 
be His witnesses, His heralds and ambassadors. 
That is the very same commission given today 
to every man called into the ministry. As we 
stand in the pulpit in Christ's name, we try to 
set forth the eternal truths of the Spirit with 
such power as to build up our congregations in 
faith and hope and love. We uncover the deeper 
motive in such a fashion as to offer soul cheer, 
comfort and courage to those who come weary 
and heavy laden out of the rough work of the 
week. As we win souls to God we have the same 
joy Bunyan felt when he said, "I have regarded 
myself as having goodly buildings where my 
spiritual children were born. My heart has been 
so wrapped up in this excellent work that I count- 
ed myself more honored of God than if He had 



made me an emperor of all the nations and lord 
of all the glory of the earth." 

It is the same feeling that the great Apostle 
had when he addressed his spiritual children at 
Thessalonica. "What is your hope, your joy, your 
crown of rejoicing? Are not even ye in the pre- 
sence of our Lord Jesus Christ at His coming? 
For ye are our glory and joy." Rising above his 
poverty, his homelessness and his persecution, the 
old hero reaches out and grasps his royal diadem. 
It is a crown blazing with stars — every star an 
immortal soul plucked from the darkness of sin 
into the light and liberty of a child of God and an 
heir of heaven. Poor — he is making many rich. 
He would not change places with Caesar. And 
so for me every attentive hearer is a delight, and 
when a repentant soul is led by the Spirit to the 
Savior, there is not only joy in heaven, but joy in 
my own heart too deep for words. 

2. Then too there are sublime studies that 
occupy my mind as minister of God's Word. They 
enable me to live in the companionship of the 
greatest minds and thoughts and souls of the 
ages. The lawyer may keep to his Blackstone, 
the physician to his Materia Medica, but for the 
minister there can be but one subject — human 
life itself. We dare not confine ourselves to any 
class of books. We must read the great poetry 
of the world and the great books of fiction for 
their interpretation of life's problems, their an- 
alysis of moral and spiritual ethics. We must 
read history and biography for the purpose of 
Christianity is the lives and character it has pro- 
duced. Philosophy and theology we read, for 
they are the science of the ordered mind and the 
record of the soul's communion with God. Science 
we read for its latest revelation of the way in 
which God walks upon the sands of time. Above 
all we spend our time on the greatest Book of 
all — that library of the soul's aspirations, and 
God's thoughts toward man which as we read it 
year by year, becomes a world of joy unspeakable. 
We nurture our souls amid the pages where Milton 
fed — where he received his inspiration for "Para- 
dise Lost" and which taught Bunyan his immor- 
tal allegory. Every nugget of truth we discover 
makes us happier than is one who has found a 
golden spoil. The study in which a devout min- 
ister prays and pores over God's Word becomes 
an ante-chamber of the King, and he hears the 
cheering voices of infinite Love saying: "Lo I 
am with you always." 



THE MISSION HERALD 



3. On the human side there are three great 
compensations. 1 find I can enter into a larger 
measure than men in other activities into fellow- 
ship with all sorts and conditions of men — with 
the rich and the poor, the cultured and the uncul- 
tured, little children and men wise in years. When 
the baby is born, when the wedding is celebrated, 
when sickness comes and all walk softly in the 
house, when death hangs crepe upon the door the 
minister is there — the friend, the sharer of joy, 
the giver of loving congratulations, the sympa- 
thizer and comforter; in his own human way just 
what Christ was in the homes in Judea. Through 
it all there is the service of love. A lawyer does 
not need to love his client nor the physician his 
patients nor the teacher his pupils. But a minis- 
ter must love his people or his work is unavailing, 
for there can be no true ministry without love. 
This helps, especially with the children, who under 
our molding touch are being fashioned day by 
day into strong, servicable men and women. 

There is joy in the seiwice of the ministry. It 
is the joy of a gardener nourishing the seed into 
a fruitful tree intensified a thousand fold inas- 
much as the minister is dealing with human souls. 
The second great human compensation is the 
ministry of comfort. Death brings sorrow. 
Whether they be young or old — the death of our 
dear ones is a rude shaking of our lives. Long- 
fellow's familiar words are among the truest of 
human experience: 

There is-no flock however watched and tended, 

But one dead lamb is there. 

There is no fireside howsoever defended, 

But has one vacant chair. 
There are, however, deeper sorrows than that 
of death — the tragedies of moral failure. A child 
trained with the utmost care, takes the reins of 
life into his own hands and drives in the path of 
unrestrained desire. Then there is the sorrow of 
seeming failure. The ocean of faith is not always 
full. Sometimes the tide is out and the flats of 
life lie bare and ugly, oozing forth the malaria of 
the doubting spirit. How shall a minister be a 
comforter? The first thing to do, the best thing 
to do, the only thing to do, is to give the sense of 
God. We cannot explain all the mystery of suff- 
ering, but to make known the presence of God — 
that will still all fear and quiet the tumult of the 
heart. The fact of God is the greatest comfort 
men can have — and there is comfort nowhere else. 
The third great human compensation is found 
in the call for ministers who can intelligently and 
sympathetically apply Christian principles to so- 
cial conditions and industrial problems. We are 
making history in our day that will loom large on 
all after time. If the coming history is to be 



made aright it must be saturated with a worthier 
national soul than we find today in the troubled 
nations of the world. Hatred and scorn cannot 
banish and drive away the forces of ill-will, but 
the power of religion can. And the minister who 
is willing to lend and to wield the finer forms of 
energy which are contained in religion at its best 
has offered to him a source of human compensa- 
tion than which there is none greater known to 
the sons of men. 

The service of humanity for the love of Christ 
is the object of a minister's life. The service is 
noble and the motive impelling. The task is big 
enough to do and the motive for doing it is large 
enough to warrant any man giving his life to it. 
As the motive of the statesman must be animated 
by liberty, uplift and justice, so the motive of 
the minister must be sustained with sacrifice and 
service. Our symbol must be the Cross. And 
when we have that a career opens before us, sur- 
passing any other in life as the interests of man- 
kind surpass all other concerns, and the minister 
feels as I do today — "How beautiful upon the 
mountain are the feet of Him who publisheth 
glad tidings." 

Preached in St. John's Church, Wilmington, N. C, by 
Rev. E. W. Halleck, B. D., on the occasion of the Twenti- 
eth Anniversary of his ordination to the ministry — St. 
Peter's Day, June 29th, 1930. 



Colleie 



Raleigh 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL and JUNIOR COL- 
LEGE, Raleigh, North Carolina, is one of the 
oldest schools of the Episcopal Church in the 
United States. It is for girls and young women. 
Founded in 1842, St. Mary's has been from the 
first intimately bound up with the life of the 
South. The family of Jefferson Davis, some of 
them, found shelter within its walls for a time 
during the Civil War. One of the daughters of 
Robert E. Lee and a daughter of Woodrow Wilson 
were students here ; and almost ten thousand other 
girls besides. 

Saint Mary's Campus, one mile west of the 
State Capitol, occupies a site of twenty acres 
crowned with native oaks and other fine trees. 
There is plenty of air, sunshine, lawn, flowers, 
squirrels, and birds. 

The fourteen buildings with modern equipment 
provide all needful comforts for wholesome living. 
We have an attractive auditorium, seating six 
hundred, a library of five thousand volumes, a 
beautiful old parlor, thirty by sixty feet, a large 
sunny dining room, a gymnasium the same size, 
with a wonderful new white-tiled swimming pool 



THE MISSION HERALD 



adjoining the gymnasium. This sunny pool is 
electrically lighted, steam-heated, the water filter- 
ed and purified by the ultra-violet ray process. 
Shower baths and dressing booths are provided. 
The Chapel, much admired, has recently had the 
addition of a splendid three-manual organ. 

Saint Mary's is a junior college, recognized as 
one of the best of its kind in America. Four 
years of high school or preparatory work are fol- 
lowed by two years of advance study, all fully 
accredited by the Southern Association. Many of 
our graduates enter the junior class in southern 
colleges or universities and secure their Bachelor 
of Arts degree in two years. In addition to straight 
academic work we offer special instruction in the 
Business School and in the departments of Art, 
Home Economics, Expression, and Music. There 
are many girls and parents who feel that there is 
a very distinct advantage here in the opportunity 
to do two years' study after leaving preparatory 
school, which is of college character, and yet car- 
ried on under conditions more home-like than those 
found in a four year college or university. 

The cost of one year's stay and study at Saint 
Mary's is made as low as possible in consideration 
of the quality of both living and instruction. No 
intelligent person wants education that is cheap 
in every sense. Our charges are studiously moder- 
ate. Our endowment helps to make them so. Ap- 
plications are now coming in for next September's 
enrollment which is limited to 200 resident stu- 
dents. 

Our faculty represent a large number of the 
foremost educational institutions both North and 
South, including Smith, Wellesley, Goucher, Co- 
lumbia, Johns Hopkins, and the Universities of 
North Carolina, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Toronto, 
and Chicago. Our faculty and students are the 
best assets we have. 

The resident student body naturally come from 
the State of North Carolina in the main ; yet there 
are nearly one hundred whose homes are in seven- 
teen states outside North Carolina; several from 
such distant states as Alabama, Michigan, New 
York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Texas. 

You may be interested regarding our education- 
al policy. We have no amazing discoveries to 
proclaim, no fads to promote. We think that a 
few lines of study carefully followed out are better 
than a tangled mass of frills and fancy stuff. We 
have discovered no effective substitute for quiet, 
persistent, happy industry. Genius is fine if you 
have it; inspiration is fine but inspiration plus 
work is the combination that wins. And that 
spells character. It belongs to the finest men and 
women who in the setting of a strong and obedient 
body possess a mind that can think straight, a 



mind that knows the true values of human life 
and can summon the power of a will self-controll- 
ed and on fire to accomplish its ends. 

Saint Mary's School is an uncompromisingly 
Christian school. The teaching and worship are 
without apology those of the Episcopal Church. 
Yet the students of other Christian communions 
will never find their convictions treated with any- 
thing but courtesy and respect. Saint Mary's 
is a Christian school, I repeat. You will find the 
heart of Saint Mary's in the Chapel and its ser- 
vices. If the Chapel ever goes the reason for 
Saint Mary's will be gone. But the Chapel will 
not go. The cross of Jesus Christ stands on the 
Chapel Altar; the cross of Christ high upon the 
main building speaks with silent eloquence in the 
sunshine by day and the moonlight by night that 
Saint Mary's School from generation to genera- 
tion is a witness to Jesus Christ. The daughters 
of Saint Mary's School are the daughters of the 
cross. We believe that the things which are seen 
are temporal but the things which are not seen 
are eternal. 

Our conviction is that society today stands pa- 
thetically and tragically in need of this view of 
life. Disillusionment and pessimism are doing 
their fearful work to poison the foundations of 
joy. Men are home-sick for God and do not know 
it. Is there anything more central in the situ- 
ation than the education of our girls? If you 
educate a boy you educate an individual; if you 
educate a girl you educate a family. How much 
higher can any civilization rise in character than 
the character of their women? Education with- 
out religion is worse than no education at all. 

REV. W. W. WAY, D. D. 



Joho Qo Bedkwittlhu 3t* g Is 



MR. John Quintus Beckwith, Jr., son of Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Q. Beckwith of Lumberton, was 
ordained a deacon in the Episcopal Church at a 
beautiful and impressive service well attended 
in Trinity Episcopal Church, Lumberton, June 17. 

Mr Beckwith, Jr. is 24 years old and was reared 
in Lumberton, his parents having moved to Lum- 
berton when he was five years old. He is a gradu- 
ate of Lumberton High School and the University 
of North Carolina, and is now a student at Virginia 
Theological Seminary, Alexandria, Va. 

Following a brief invocation by Bishop Darst„ 
the vested choir entered from the front door of 
the Church, marching down the aisle singing a. 
hymn. Behind came the six ministers and young 
Mr. Beckwith. An important part of the ordina- 



THE MISSION HERALD 



tion service was the sacrament of the Lord's Sup- 
per, administered by Bishop Darst, assisted by 
Rev. Mr. Noe, first to the visiting ministers, then 
to the immediate family of the candidate and 
finally to the congregation at large. The service 
was concluded with the choir and clergy leaving 
the Church in the same manner in which they 
entered. 

Boldness In Faith 

The sermon was an exhortation to the candidate 
to have great boldness in the faith which is Christ 
Jesus. "Great boldness in the faith of the Lord 
Jesus is the great thing that is needed in the 
Church today," said Dr. Dean. "It is not so much 
to have faith as to have courage for the expression 
of faith. It takes boldness to be a minister — it 
takes faith and courage to live this life. You be- 
come this day a minister of Christ, and the world 
will know you as such. 

"To have this boldness — to be effective — there 
must be a preparation in the soul. It takes bold- 
ness to keep out of the rut. It is so easy to get 
in the rut of easy life. It is so easy to pity our- 
selves and complain. We must have boldness and 
courage — it is the presence of God that give us 
strength to do this." 

The examination was conducted by Bishop 
Darst after the sermon. Then in the most im- 
pressive part of the whole service, the Bishop or- 
dained Mr. Beckwith to the full powers of a deacon 
by the laying on of hands. 

The choir was made up of Mesdames J. Q. Beck- 
with, Sr., and F. D. Hackett, Jr., Misses Evaline 
Beckwith, Elizabeth Shaw, Anna Lawrence, Emma 
Thompson, and Cora McNeill, Messrs. J. D. Beck- 
with, Duvol Lennon, Wilton Barnes, and John 
Brown. Mrs. T. A. McNeill was at the organ. 

— From Robesonian 



|Thompson Orphanage & Training^ 
Institution i 



1 Rev. W. H. Wheeler, Editor % 

THE notes for this month have to do with the 
organizations existing at the Orphanage and 
are written by boys or girls connected with the 
various clubs or societies. 

The Wohelo Club 
One of the flourishing organizations of the Or- 
phanage is the Wohelo Branch of the Girl Reserve 
Club. The name, Wohelo, stands for work, health 
and love. The club consists of about twenty girls 
under the guidance of Mrs. Lucas. The president 
is Sadie Cahoon; vice-president, Lucille Vincent; 
secretary, Floy Lee Brady. We meet every Thurs- 
day afternoon. 



Recently, Mrs. Lucas entertained u s at her 
home. We enjoyed the party very much, especi- 
ally the first game we played. Mrs. Lucas gave 
each girl an all-day sucker and material to dress 
it with. The girl who dressed her doll most at- 
tractively in crepe paper, received a prize. Rosa 
Duffy got the first prize and Roselia Goodrich the 
second prize. After playing some outdoor games 
we went in for refreshments. Every one went 
home happy and feeling that they had never had 
such a good time before. 

During the summer Mrs. Lucas and the girls 
are studying birds, flowers and trees. After 
we have completed our study, we hope to present 
a Nature Book to the Library. 

ROSELIA GOODRICH. 



Boy Scout Troop 

Troop 14, the Thompson Orphanage Troop, is 
made up of twelve boys divided into two patrols 
of six each. Mr. Walker Jarrell is the very ex- 
cellent Leader. We have had several contests 
between the two patrols on first aid, signalling, 
nature study and other things of importance for 
Boy Scouts. Not long ago there was held a field 
event in which our troop carried away the honors. 

We have been invited to come to the Boy Scout 
Camp on the Catawba River, through the kind- 
ness of Mr. J. E. Steere, Boy Scout Executive, 
and we are looking forward to going this next 
month. We all enjoy this very much as we all 
enjoy getting out in the open and swimming and 
boating. 

This year we have been making bird houses, 
fixing chairs and tables. We are now having a 
contest to see who can make the best bird house. 
A prize of $5.00 has been offered by a good friend 
for the best bird house. 

Meetings are held Friday nights and minutes 
are kept by Oscar Gatlin, our Scribe. 

We have been to the river on an all-night hike 
and had great fun, especially around the camp 
fire. 

M. R. GUFFY, Patrol Leader. 



Young People's Service League 

We are continuing our Y. P. S. L. meetings 
during the summer months. The present officers 
are as follows : President, Roselia Goodrich ; vice- 
president, Lucille Vincent ; secretary, Rosa Duffy ; 
corresponding secretary, Floy Lee Brady. 

We meet every Sunday evening at 6:45. 

Instead of having a program committee, the 
boys have the program one Sunday and the girls 
the next. This puts up some very helpful compe- 
tition and the result is some interesting programs. 

A few weeks ago we had a very interesting' and 



THE MISSION HERALD 



enjoyable Social. Everybody who came had to 
put on a stunt. 

Wade Webb won the first prize for his illustrat- 
ed songs, and Ellen Ridehour and Lydia Elliott 
won second prize for their very clever exhibition 
of tap dancing. 

Every one enjoyed the Social very much. 



Girl's Friendly Society 

On Sunday, June 1st, the beautiful admission 
service of the Society was conducted in Saint 
Mary's Chapel and eight girls received into full 
membership and presented with their pins. The 
following girls were admitted : Dora Bell Hough, 
Kathleen Kissiah, Elizabeth Jones, Aldine Phil- 
lips, Fanny Sarrett, Mabel Smith, Melba Carson, 
Era Mae Haddock. 



CHURCH SCHOOL CONTRIBUTIONS TO 
ORPHANAGE 



RESOLVED : That the Treasurer of the Sunday 
Schools be instructed to remit promptly to the 
Treasurer of the Diocese of East Carolina and 
that the Mission Herald be requested to publish 
quarterly the amounts sent in by each Sunday 
School. 



Offerings sent direct to the Treasurer of the Dio- 
cese to the end of the second quarter, 
June 30, 1930 

St. Paul's Sunday School, Greenville $ 5.16 

St. Paul's Sunday School, Beaufort 16.18 

St. Mary's Sunday School, Gatesville .;______ 3.00 

St. Philip's Sunday School, Southport .. 5.10 

Christ Church Sunday School, Eliz. City, 22.07 
Holy Innocents' S. S., Seven Springs _ 8.20 

Zion Sunday School, Jessama 9.76 

St. John's Sunday School, Grifton 3.25 



Total 



$ 72.72 



DELGADO EPISCOPAL MISSION 

A. T. St. Amand, D. L. R. 

Lay ma n-in-Charge 



MONEY is the same as the little boy says 
the definition of a lie was: "A very pleas- 
ant help in time of trouble." 'Tis true we are 
pleased to accept any contributions, matters not 
hoAV small, and assure you it will be used to best 
advantages, still this article is not an appeal. I 
feel that many should know more of our work 
than was given in November issue of the Herald. 
To our appeal for chancel furniture then given, 
came responses from; St. Agnes' Guild, of St. 
James' Parish, with the donation of enough cash 
for the building of our Altar; Rev. Alexander 
Miller, of St. Paul's, with the loan of a prayer desk 
and hymn board; Mrs. Joseph Price, Aunt Lassie, 



as she is known to many, with a lecturn, a me- 
morial to her son; through Rev. Frank D. Dean, 
we were given by Mr. T. P. Ramsey, manager of 
Steiff's Piano Store, a good organ; through our 
beloved Bishop, the Delgado Cotton Mills allowed 
us the use of a six room cottage and he also ar- 
ranged alterations of this cottage in such a way 
as to meet our present needs. On one side is the 
Chapel which takes a room for the chancel and 
two for the naive which seats about forty with 
ten more on the porch. On the other side the 
vestry room, a class room and the lobby. The 
first Sunday in January saw a small, but nice 
church school started. We now have around 
thirty-five in good attendance with our four teach- 
ers using the Jacob's system. Captain William 
D. Bence, of the American, assisted at times by 
Captain Fred A. Turner, of the English Church 
Army, my assistant, Oliver Carter, Jr., P. L. R., 
and self conducted a two weeks mission, starting 
April 22. As a result twenty-seven were baptized 
and fourteen confirmed. At the confirmation 
service there was a parish and a diocesan lay 
reader, a church army captain, a priest and our 
Bishop in the chancel. Our altar was consecrated 
at that time. In a most excellent way we cele- 
brated the nineteenth centennial of our church, 
Whitsunday, by our first communion service, Rev. 
Alexander Miller, whom the Bishop has appointed 
priest in charge, being the celebrant. All told, 
we had fifteen present, 8:30 a. m. Through the 
untiring efforts of Mrs. St. Amand, who has ren- 
dered so much help with the music, we shall have 
a vested choir by July 1st. There were plans 
afoot also to organizing a Woman's Auxiliary in 
the immediate future. Our beloved Bishop has 
promised us another visit in the fall and we trust 
that he shall be more than pleased with our pro- 
gress. Our greatest drawback is to overcome the 
idea among the people of Delgado that we are 
Roman Catholics. When that is accomplished our 
work is established beyond a doubt. 

Space does not permit me to name all who have 
assisted in our work but T want to say I thank you 
all and may God bless you. 

May I ask in closing, your prayers that God 
will guide the workers in direction of the Mission 
for the Master's Kingdom. 



CHURCH GROUNDS 



THE chairman of publicity for the district of 
Western Nebraska calls attention to the very 
adverse publicity which inevitably comes from un- 
sightly and untidy grounds around churches, the 
appearance of Church buildings and grounds be- 
ing certain to create an impression, good or bad, 
on those who pass. 



THE. MISSION HERALJ 



%k* M 



isawn imtxn 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

, EDITORIAL STAFF ' 

Editor 

KEY. GEORGE F. HILL ; ' 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. KEY. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. ; 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. " 
Obituaries and .formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as " second class matter at the' Post Office, 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. ■ . ... . 

SUBSCRIPTIONS IN ARREARS 



»UR1NG the first week of this month we sent 
out 668 statements to subscribers to the 
Mission Herald for subscriptions in arrears. To 
date, July 15th. we have received 133 replies. 
most of these enclosing amounts due. We are. 
sure it is the wish of the Bishop and the Diocesan 
Church in general that the diocesan paper serve 
the full membership of the diocese. If the dio- 
cese was financially able it would send the Mission 
Herald to every family in the diocese free. Inas- 
much as the diocese cannot do this the members 
must subscribe at SI. 00 per year in advance to 
receive the Mission Herald. The ruling of the 
Post Office Department does not permit papers, 
given second class mailing privileges, to carry any 
subscribers more than a year in arrears. It per- 
mits a paper to carry only 10% of its subscribers 
who are in arrears one year or less. More than 10% 
of our present subscribers are in arrears. We 
dislike to drop names from our list and we will 
do most anything within the law to keep from it. 
We are making every effort to hold the sub- 
scribers we have. If you are in arrears will you 
not send us your remittance before AUGUST 
FIRST? You can tell if you are in arrears by 
looking at your name printed either on the top of 
the front page or on the wrapper. For example, 
''John Smith. April 30". means that John Smith's 
subscription expired April 1930. therefore he 
should send to the Mission Herald. Elizabeth City, 
N. C, $1.00 to pay up to April 1931. WILL YOU 
COOPERATE? 



THIS ISSUE 



IN this issue of the Mission Herald you will find 
much interesting material. Mr. Halleck"s lead- 
ing article, is heart searching and truly helpful, 
not to the clergy alone but to those sitting in the 
pews. Dr. Way gives a brief story of St. Mary's 
— read it. Then there is much to learn from the 
short and interesting accounts of the work being 
done in the mission fields — Liberia, Persia, Philip- 
pines; Japan, Mexico and the Near East. 



NO AUGUST ISSUE 



AS usual, this issue .of the Mission Herald. is. 
for July. and August-. No issue therefore 
will be mailed out in August. We hope tp make 
the September number o f particular interest. 
Surely you want to receive it ! Please do not com- 
pel us to drop your name from our list because 
you. are in arrears !■ 



ERRORS 

IT often happens that incorrect initials, street 
addresses and other mistakes occur in a mail- 
ing list. If there is an error of any sort in yours 
will you please let us know? We try to correct 
every error that comes to our attention. When 
sending in addresses or names please be sure to 
write them clearly or better still, print them. 



DR. DISOSWAY ON LEAVE 



DE. Luia M. Disosway of New Bern, N. C. who 
has been working at St. Elizabeth's Hospital 
Shanghai, China, for four years, left there on 
June 23rd. for a visit home. She returns by way 
of Europe where she will see the Passion Play, 
visit Genoa, Paris, London and other places of 
interest. She plans to sail from England August 
30th and reach New York about the 6th of Sep- 
tember. 

East Carolina is proud of her Medical Mission- 
ary in Miss Disosway and we extend to her a 
warm and loving welcome back home. 



EVANGELISM 



G3 for souls and go for the WORST." This is 
one of the mottoes of Prebendary Carlile of 
the Church Army. "Do the work of an evangelist 
and discuss the subject less," adds Captain Mount- 
ford. "Slowly, very slowly, our Church here in 
America is waking up to Evangelism, but it is 
very respectable Evangelism at present that is 
being engaged in. We are. generally speaking, 
only evangelising one another within the Beloved 
Community." 



THE MISSION HERALD 



9 



Liberim. Prophet ; 

'"When the word of the prophet shall come to pass, 
then shall the prophet be known, that the Lord hath, truly 
sent him.'' 

ANY years ago, when the West Coast of 
Africa was much farther away than it 
seems now, there was born in the Grebo tribe in 
Liberia a small boy who was to become the most 
widely known man in Liberia. He was born about 
1851, in which year the Rev. Dr. John Payne was 
consecrated first bishop of Liberia, or perhaps it 
was in 1852, the year when Robert Fulton Cutting 
was born in New York. The little African grew 
up in a casual -way, worked for some years on 
coasting vessels and then as a young man found 
himself at Cuttington, the new Episcopal Church 
school near Cape Palmas named for its- chief do- 
nor, R. F. Cutting. • 

The chief of the Grebo tribe had been baptized 
not long before this. The young tribesman also 
became a Christian, with the name of William 
Wade Harris, and at Cuttington received his 
meager but effective education. 

Years of obscurity followed until about 1924 
when for the offense, it is said, of flying a British 
flag over his hut when he heard a rumor that 
Liberia had become British territory, he was sent 
to jail. While in jail he had a vision, and on his 
release, he went off along the Gold Coast and the 
Ivory Coast on preaching tours which occupied 
the next ten years of his life. 

"Turbaned and white-robed, with a broad red 
band round his shoulders and carrying a bamboo 
staff with a small cross at the top, he went preach- 
ing from village to village like the prophets of 
old. His theological knowledge was scanty," says 
a . writer in- The Manchester Guardian, "but he 
told his hearers that there was .one God and that 
Christ died on the Cross to save men. He told 
them to abandon their fetish worship, build 
churches, get Bibles, and' wait patiently until the 
day when the white man should come to teach 
them. He appointed a preacher and twelve men ' 
to manage church affairs. For himself he would 
receive no reward except his food and lodging, 
and he resisted all the temptations thrust upon 
. him to grow rich." 

Thousands and thousands of people renounced 
their old way of life, and even after the prophet's 
influence was withdrawn . (by the request of the 
French government he returned to Liberia, for it 
was feared that the mass movement might lead 
to disorders!', the little uninstructed churches 
continued. Buildings were erected and! English 
Bibles vert procured although nobody could read 
them. 



In 1924 the news of this .vast number of unshep- 
hered Christians, if they may be called so, reached 
the Wesleyan Missionary Society, whose work 
was nearest that region. The Rev. W. J. Piatt 
visited the Ivory Coast and found the tales were 
not exaggerated. Though some had fallen away, 
there was a definite community of some 20,000 
people, all of whom, before the prophet's coming, 
had been fetish-worshipers. Mr. Piatt and six 
other missionaries have since been working among 
them and the Christian community now numbers 
40.000. 

Meanwhile, all trace of the prophet himself was 
lost until 1927. when he was found by a French 
traveler in the village of Graway, near Cape 
Mount, living quietly in a half-ruined hut. Bishop 
Campbell also saw him there. 

For some time past there has been a rumor of 
his death, finally confirmed now. in 1930. He 
died as he lived, in poverty, and in communion 
with the Church. 

"He was what may be called an Old Testament 
Christian, for he never fully appreciated the sig- 
nificance of the New Testament. Yet. in a very 
remarkable manner and independently of any or- 
ganized Christian society, he was the means of 
putting before his fellow Africans new spiritual 
truths upon which a deep and real Christianity 
is being built. This simple tribesman in Liberia 
was indeed in the line of the prophets."' 



PERSIA TODAY 



SIX weeks in Persia bring back memories that 
that will never fade — memories of lofty moun- 
tains and far-reaching deserts — of garden oases 
and populous cities — of the faded glories of Perse- 
polis, the Persia of Darius, and Xerxes, of the 
poets Sadi and Hafiz ; the Persia where Nestorian 
bishops once had many Christian Churches that 
were wiped out by Islam; the Persia where Islam 
is beginning to crumble under the pressure of 
secular and materialistic civilization; the Persia 
where today British and American missionaries 
are experiencing the joys of a spiritual- harvest 
and a promising indigenous church is springing 
into being. 

Persia's population is 12 millions, mostly Mos- 
lem, with an area of 688,000 square miles, i. e., 
an average of about 20 people to a square mile. 
The two nations who exercise the greatest influ- 
ence over Persia are Great Britian on the South 
and Russia on the North. Russia has a monopoly 
in cotton and seems to be capturing the sugar 
trade, There is a Bolshevist school in Teheran 
and a strorjg Bolshevist prov^ganda among Per- 



10 



THE MISSION HERALD 



sian peasants, carpet weavers and manual labor- 
ers. 

Persia has a parliament elected by the people, 
and nationalism is all the rage. 

Islam seems to be losing its hold on the edu- 
cated classes. The power of Moslem ecclesiastics 
is broken in west Persia. Many Moslem women 
are discarding* the veil and men and women walk 
together in the streets. Unfortunately the drink- 
ing of intoxicating liquors is on the increase — as 
are also irreligion and materialism. 

Nearly all of Persia is divided in the most 
friendly way between the Church Missionary So- 
ciety (Anglican) in the south and the American 
Presbyterians in the north. As to the methods 
employed in missionary work, first comes the dis- 
tribution of the Scriptures. In south Persia the 
majority of converts were won directly or indi- 
rectly through mission hospitals. The Anglican 
Church i s located in Ispahan on the hospital 
grounds. In the rest of Persia the majority of 
converts are due to mission schools. 

In Resht, near the Caspian Sea, there are a 
church, hospital and schools under the leadership 
of Dr. Frame, and his associates. The doctor has 
labored here over 24 years. In Teheran I visited 
the mission college which is the only institutions 
in Persia granting the B. A. degree. In addition 
a strong educational work is being carried on by 
the London Jews Society, for both boys and girls. 
From Teheran to Hamadan was a journey of 240 
miles by automobile over a pass 7,500 feet above 
the sea. Thence we traveled over a pass 8,500 
feet above the sea to Kermanshah. In both these 
cities missionaries are carrying on most important 
work. 

The visit to Ispahan was most interesting. 
This is Persia's ancient capital and a center of 
Islamic learning which is marked by conservation 
and fanaticism. It is still called "Markas-i-Maz- 
bah," or the center of religion. When the C. M. 
S. began work in this region it was impossible to 
locate in Ispahan, so the Society's workers located 
across the river, in an Armenian colony. At that 
time no Christian was allowed to enter the city. 
Now there is in this city a Persian Church of 
over 300 converts from Islam. It has not been 
easy for the converts. In 1884 one Moslem man 
was baptized, but it was six years before another 
ventured. Eleven years passed after the first 
Moslem man became a Christian before a Moslem 
woman was baptized. The total baptisms have 
been over 500 in this single city. The little flock 
is fiercely persecuted, especially by the Bahais. 

Bishop Linton invited to supper several young 
converts who told me their stories. One is the 



son of a head mullah who is a descendent of Mo- 
hammed. Another, who was himself a mullah, 
had his death warrant signed by his own brother 
because he had become a Christian. He escaped 
death, but was banished. Another was locked up 
in his home during the hour set for his baptism ; 
being released by his people in the afternoon he 
went straightway to the English service and was 
baptized there. 

Some years ago a Moslem invited Bishop Linton 
to be his guest. This Moslem and four of his 
friends had been studying the Bible together and 
asked for baptism. The Bishop was fully satis- 
fied with their sincerity and was preparing to 
baptize them, when the Moslem servant also ex- 
pressed his desire to become a Christian. The 
Bishop asked how he had come to a knowledge of 
Christ, and his reply was: "I have served tea to 
the gentlemen when they have read the Bible to- 
gether." So the Bishop baptized the six Moslem 
men and appointed his host lay reader. I found 
that the six have increased to fifteen who are en- 
rolled as members of the little Church. The co- 
operation between the mission is shown (a) by 
the Intermission literature committee producing 
literature in Persian, (b) inter-church confer- 
ence in Ispahan, 1927, as a result of which ground 
work was laid for possible future union of the 
Churches in Persia. This plan is to be laid before 
the bishops at the above conference to try to en- 
list every member of the Church in Persia in the 
work of spreading the Gospel. 



CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS IN PERSIA 



MISSION SCHOOLS in Persia recently com- 
pleted a year under government regula- 
tions. The schools include Moslems, Jews and 
Christians. The government decreed that the 
Bible should not be used as a textbook, though it 
allowed teaching selections from the "great pro- 
phets," in ethics courses., and from the Moslem 
point of view Bible characters from Adam to St. 
Paul may be considered prophets. 

One regulation was that all Moslem pupils were 
to have an annual examination in Moslem law, 
and as the Jews and Christians did not have this, 
it amounted to an official punishment for being 
Moslem. And this unfairness so struck the ex- 
amining board in one province that the very day 
before examination they decreed that Jews should 
also be examined in Jewish law, and Christians 
in Christian law. Much consternation. 

There was a Christian on the examining com- 
mittee, but he was away and the questions were 
all prepared by the other members, three Moslems 
and a Bahai. The examination therefore showed 
a non-Christian idea of the relative content of 



THE MISSION HERALD 



11 



Judaism, Islam and Christianity. The questions 
asked of the Jewish boys were largely based on 
ceremonial law and Mosaic teachings as to God's 
attributes. The questions on Islam were some- 
what similar, stressing external matters of cere- 
mony, and included social and business procedures 
which Moslems conduct in religious courts. En- 
tirely different were the questions asked of the 
Christians, including Christ's teaching as to the 
relation of man to God and man to man, and facts 
about Christ and the development of Christianity. 
The Christian examination was based on material 
in an official textbook on ancient history, used in 
the government schools ; the summary of Christi- 
anity contained in this text is excellent, free from 
hostile criticism, and a credit to the Persian min- 
istry of education as a fine attempt to be fair to 
Christianity as one of the great religions of the 
world. Three or four Jewish boys chose to take 
the Christian examination, and the following week 
they asked to be prepared for baptism. The ex- 
amination itself rather impressed those who con- 
ducted it with the superiority of Christianity as 
an irenic, unifying force in a land torn with racial 
and religious antagonisms. 



JAPAN AND BEAUTY 



I 



T is of great importance in a country such as 
Japan, with so many magnificent Buddhist 
temples, and such a feeling for art, that our 
Christian Church should represent worthily the 
splendor and beauty which you at home are well 
accustomed to associate With the idea of Christian 
worship. Unfortunately, it is a fact that the 
Christian churches of many missions throughout 
Japan, with a few outstanding exceptions, are an 
epitome of mediocrity and ugliness; therefore, 
may I venture to express what I know to be the 
feeling of many of my fellow missionaries, the 
earnest wish that our church people at home would 
realize the importance of the Gospel of Christian 
beauty to the Orient. 

The magnificence of the ancient Buddhist tem- 
ples in Japan was greatly if not entirely due, in 
the first place at least, to the zeal and talents of 
Buddhist missionaries who came from China and 
Korea, bearing gifts of the rarest beauty, of cost- 
ly material and workmanship; gifts, be it noted, 
that were sent by the faithful who, remaining at 
home, made the missionaries their emissaries and 
were represented by their offerings. In this re- 
spect, our Christian church is cold and indifferent 
by comparison. Christian art, as it is represent- 
ed by architecture, sculpture, painting, decoration, 
furnishings, sacred vessels, stained glass and tex- 
tiles and embroidery, equals, and at certain points 
surpasses, even the splendor and beauty of the 



Buddhistic. But Japanese Christians, from ex- 
amples before them here, could not divine this, 
unless they had traveled in foreign lands. 



IS A POOR HOUSE NEEDED? 



I was astonished when I came to Gainesville and 
could not find the poor house. I thought that 
every self-respecting county had some place pro- 
vided for the old folks, or at least a poor farm. 
And then I found that the county commissioners 
had a long list of what they called paupers, whom 
they helped each month with a small check with 
which to buy groceries. These folks are with 
relatives and in homes of people they love. How 
much better it is than a poor house, which might 
be so miserably managed by a person whose sole 
recommendation for the job is that he was very 
active in the last campaign in local politics! 

Then I was astonished again when I read Dean 
Lathrop's report before the last annual Confer- 
ence of Social Service, in San Francisco, in which 
he said : "The poor house — the county poor farm 
— is an antique that has been held over from past 
generations. It is extravagantly expensive. If 
the capital invested plus the annual expense were 
diverted to old-age pensions under supervision of 
social workers, there would be an economy of ex- 
pense, and a much better situation for the county 
poor." 

But somewhere tucked away in nearly every 
county is a poor house, or alms house. And as 
long as it is there and there are any people being 
cared for within its humble walls, there is a very 
real call to Christian people to go and minister to 
them . . . Those old folks in the county home 
used to be young and fresh, loved and loving, in 
the morning of life. Now in the twilight they are 
lonely, and hungry for an echo from the past. 
"Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the 
least of these," said the Saviour. I don't know of 
any poor houses in Palestine, but I know there 
were many very poor and miserable people whom 
Jesus cheered and comforted in the lovely splendor 
of His young manhood. — Rev. Wm. S. Stoney. 



CHURCH SCHOOL BY MAIL 



OVER a thousand boys and girls are receiving 
Church School instruction by mail, in eighty- 
two dioceses and districts. Adults and young 
are being prepared individually for baptism and 
confirmation in rural places where class sessions 
are impossible, the preparation being carried on 
by mail, by the candidate's own rector. 

Church work among the isolated now has dio- 
cesan leaders in seventy-six dioceses and districts. 
Their titles and their methods are various and are 



12 



THE MISSION HERALD 



made to fit the special problems of their own field. 
One thing found to be essential to all has been to 
connect every isolated family with some parish, 
whose rector becomes their rector, and whose 
work and fellowship become their fellowship, even 
though at a distance and without much opportu- 
nity for personal contact. 

For adults and young people, twenty-two read- 
ing courses have been .prepared by seventeen in- 
structors in various parts of the country, who 
direct the reading and answer questions by mail. 
Mothers are taking these courses for help with 
their children ; teachers and lay readers are also 
using them. Books are borrowed from the Church 
Mission House library, and a special lending 
library with longer time limits is being developed. 

In Alaska and the Philippines the work is being 
organized, the Church Periodical Club helping 
with textbooks. The Seaman's Church Institute 
plans to use some of the reading courses for sail- 
ors who ask for religious instruction — yes, some 
do! The Department of Missions Committee on 
Church work for the blind cooperates, with Braille 
literature. Deaf people, peculiarly isolated, are 
helped by the work and both they and the blind 
and many individuals, shut-ins and others. 



NEAR EAST 



FOR more than one hundred years the Episco- 
pal Church has been doing work in the Near 
East. An intensification of its work and widen- 
ing of its field have been undertaken in the last 
five years through the educational chaplains. 
Palestine, Mesopotamia and Greece are the fields 
of work. 

In Jerusalem the American chaplain, the Rev. 
Charles Thorley Bridgeman, assists the Patriarch 
of the American Church in training the priests 
of that Church in their important theological 
seminary on Mt. Zion. This vital work is design- 
ed by the Patriarch to give the Armenian Church 
a priesthood educated to meet the manifold mod- 
ern problems. 

A smaller education of priests for the Syrian 
Church in Jerusalem is undertaken by the Ameri- 
can chaplain at the request of their Patriarch. 

The chaplain acts as adviser to the Orthodox 
Church's department of education, and with funds 
given by Church people apart from the Good 
Friday Offering which is inadequate to meet all 
demands, helps with small subsidies the impover- 
ished but important school work of the Orthodox 
Church for the native Christians. 

Other activities maintained in the name of the 
Church are the education of forty Armenian child- 
ren in Syria, the promotion of the Daily Vacation 
Bible School in the Orthodox Church, the promo- 



tion of Sunday school work, the caie of American 
residents and visitors, and other duties incident 
to serving on the staff of the Anglican Bishop. 
With a portion of the Good Friday Offering the 
American Church, in cooperation with the Angli- 
can diocese of Jerusalem, which includes a fine 
system of Church schools for all races and creeds, 
a hospital at Hebron, serving Moslems, Jews and 
Christians, and evangelistic work for Jews and 
Moslems. 

In Mesopotamia, the Assyrian Church, the 
apostolic Church which once spread a missionary 
program over all Asia, as far as India and China, 
has gradually been reduced by war and persecu- 
tion to a mere handful, which before the World 
War lived under their Patriarch in the mountains 
of Kurdistan. Exiled and decimated by the war, 
there are now but 25,000 refugees resident in 
Mesopotamia, chiefly at Mosul. The Archbishop 
of Canterbury's Mission, started in 1885, did much 
to help educate their clergy and people, but was 
unable to continue after the war. The American 
Church was invited to aid in saving this neglected 
but heroic people. 

Througn an American educational chaplain in 
Mosul, the Rev. John Panfil, the following work 
is done with funds from the Good Friday Offering 
and the Assyrian Relief Fund: schools in Mosul 
and in the villages; medical work to stem the 
ravages of malaria; relief work and settlement, 
straightening the hands of the Assyrian Patri- 
arch, Mar Shimmun. 

To Greece, one hundred years ago, the Board 
of Missions sent an educational mission to help 
the Greek people and the Greek Church just then 
emerging from four hundred years' slavery to the 
Turks. Work was done in Athens, Syra and 
Crete, and later (1842) a mission was sent to 
Constantinople under Bishop Southgate, aiding 
education among Christians of the East. This 
was interrupted in 1849, but resumed by the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury's Mission to the Assyrians, 
and by the American chaplains now at work in 
Jerusalem and Mosul. 

In Athens the Hill School for Girls was started 
a hundred years ago by the Episcopal Church and 
still is owned by it. through a special board of 
trustees. Its support is separate from the Good 
Friday Offering. It is commended to our atten- 
tion at this time as the best school for girls in 
Greece. New buildings are needed to improve 
and enlarge the work. 

The Church's policy of aiding the apostolic 
Church of the East in training their clergy has 
brought appeals for similar work from the Patri- 
arch of Alexandria and the Coptic Church in 
Egypt, from the Patriarch of Rumania and the 



THE MISSION HERALD 



13 



Metropolitan of Athens. Educational chaplains 
are needed to fill these posts. 

The Good Friday Offering, made by grateful 
Christian people, is the means which the National 
Council designates to support this work. The 
maintenance and strengthening of the work de- 
pend on this voluntary offering, to which at pres- 
sent but one-fourth of the parishes respond, and 
the total offering of $25,000 a year is all too small 
for the waiting opportunities. It is our privilege, 
not to say obligation, to help the apostolic 
Churches of the East. 



MEXICO 



WHAT could sound better than to say that the 
"School of Triumph" is a day nursery and 
school conducted by the Church for poor children 
in Mexico City? It is a true statement, but the 
school, so the Bishop says, though entered through 
a clean and flowery courtyard, is a shaky frame 
shack, about eight feet by twelve, with twenty 
small tots, aged three to five, on the ground floor 
and up an improvised stairway, thirty-two older 
pupils, in the second and third grades. The build- 
ing shook with added weight of the visitors. 

With its present inadequate equipment and poor 
quarters, the school cannot hope for Government 
recognition, which means that when the children 
reach the third grade they must leave as they 
can only enter the upper grades from an accredit- 
ed school. 

The work is pure social service. All the child- 
ren are extremely poor, with fathers and mothers 
who go out to work for small earnings, or they 
are orphans, taken from the street at three years 
old or even younger. They play and "study" 
under splendid Christian influence, are encouraged 
to attend Church school on Sunday, and given a 
•bent toward good things. 

The school is run at a cost of $37.50 a month, 
U. S. currency. 



PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 



PEOPLE who were harrowed by the descrip- 
tion of the house in which the Rev. and Mrs. 
R. F. Wilner and their three young children have 
been trying to live, at Baguio in the Philippine 
Islands, a house which leaked everywhere and 
came off in pieces in one's hands, will rejoice to 
know that the National Council has appropriated 
for a new residence $5,000 from legacies received 
and not designated for any definite purpose. 

Summarizing his work, Mr Wilner writes in the 
Bethlehem Churchman: "Mrs. Wilner and I are 
very happy in our work here in Baguio. We are 



in charge of Easter School for Igorot boys and 
girls, and I am also chaplain of Brent School for 
American boys and girls. There are about seven- 
ty children at Easter School, from the second to 
seventh grades inclusive. A small amount of in- 
dustrial work is done, partly for the training 
which it gives, and partly for the support which 
it provides the school as the appropriation is not 
sufficient to keep things going without this as- 
sistance." The girls weave on hand looms, mak- 
ing luncheon sets, towels, etc., which are sold in 
the States ; the boys look after the school garden, 
make baskets, cut fire wood. All the work of the 
school is done by the children. The daily schedule 
begins at five a. m. 



LIBERIA 



B 



ACK in the bush in Liberia, the hospital of 
the Holy Cross Mission at Masambolahun is 
increasing its work, under Dr. Maas. A glance at 
a map of Liberia will show that the borders of 
Sierra Leone and French Guinea are not far from 
this location. Last December, the first month 
after the doctor's return from furlough, they had 
in the out-patient department 482 from Liberia, 
417 from Sierra Leone, and 927 from French 
Guinea; 1091 men and boys, 735 women and girls. 
This included people from ten tribes. The actual 
number of treatments lacked just four of 10,000, 
including 2198 dressings, and 6961 injections. 
There were 29 in-patients in the hospital, and the 
doctor had 29 major operations and 11 minor 
operations in the month. The charge for a major 
operation is two kerosene tins full of rice. Vege- 
tables are supplied from the hospital farm. 



CHINESE MISSION 



T 



Our 



'RUE Sunshine Missions for Chinese: 
two Chinese Missions in San Francisco and 
Oakland continue to make steady progress. This 
is largely due to the consecrated leadership of our 
Chinese priest, the Rev. Daniel Wu, who has won 
the esteem of all. In San Francisco the day school 
crowds the building to overflowing, while the night 
school for young men is the largest of its kind 
in the city. The mission has its own mission 
board of Chinese business men, all communicants 
and Mr. Wu is assisted by two Chinese lay read- 
ers, in addition to a staff of faithful and efficient 
teachers. Many improvements have been made 
in the building and equipment, and the Chinese 
themselves are doing their full share to the 
Church's program. In Oakland a similar con- 
dition exists and we may well be proud of the 
fine work being accomplished. 

- — Diocesan Annual Report, 



14 



THE MISSION HERALD 



WORSHIPPING 



The Epistle for the Seventh Sunday after Trin- 
ity is recommended by a Chinese parish priest in 
Hankow as "a very good text for exhorting Christ- 
ians to give more offerings to the Church, because 
they spent much larger amounts for idol worship 
when they were non-Christians." Henry James 
speaks of an American lady who worshipped Paris, 
"with costly ceremonies." 



W©inniMi 9 § Auxiliary 

Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. 



X Publicity Chairman T 



LETTER FROM EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



COULD we wish for each other any greater 
gift than that we may know the power of 
our Lord's resurrection? If we could know that, 
nothing could be too difficult for us to attempt 
since the fellowship of His sufferings would be a 
deep, wonderful experience made beautiful by the 
power of His resurrection. 

In greeting the new Presiding Bishop, I told him 
that we brought to him the loyalty of the whole 
Auxiliary. One of the immediate ways we are 
showing that loyalty is the manner in which the 
women of the Church are entering into the Coun- 
cil's plans for the Advance Work program. And 
isn't it a joy to think of and plan the building 
YOUR diocese is going to give? 

This quarterly letter is a little late because at 
the time it should have been written I was still 
on a most interesting trip and so away from head- 
quarters. As the presidents of the diocesan 
branches in the Province of the Pacific knowi 
I had the pleasure of being in that Province all 
through March, and a day or two in February 
and April too. They know all about the trip for 
they planned it and a number of them were my 
very kind hostesses, and all of them took such 
thought for the work that my visit was made an 
experience not to be forgotten. I long to share 
that experience for I wish that we could all know 
each other. If you could only all see the fine, 
courageous work that is going on throughout this 
Church of ours, you would have a new sense of 
fellowship one with another. I cannot even write 
of it well enough or fully enough to make it vivid 
to you, but if you ever grow discouraged as you 
face problems (and what tremendous ones we do 
face if we are half alive to present conditions in 
the world and the Church!), remember that hun- 
dreds of other women in the Church face them too. 
"FACE THEM?" I hear you say, "do we really 



do that ? Isn't there much ignorance and indiffer- 
ence?" No one who sees at all can help seeing 
that both ignorance and indifference exist, but so 
do insight and willingness to attempt service un- 
der a risen, living Leader. Surely, as we yield 
ourselves more and more to His leadership we 
shall realize more and more our fellowship with 
each other in His Church. 

It is a pleasure to tell you that a new book by 
Dr. William C. Sturgis, entitled "The Practice of 
Prayer," is just out. The book is based on the 
course which Dr. Sturgis gave at Washington 
during the meeting of the General Convention in 
1928, and can be ordered from the Book Store 
here at 281, or from other book stores; it is 
published by the Morehouse Publishing Company, 
and the price is one dollar. 

Partly because we at headquarters feel that you 
and we are one big farriily, and partly because 
I want to ask your prayers for her, I must tell 
you that Mrs. Wade has been very ill, having had 
an operation for mastoid. She is better, but you 
will think of her and help her through your 
prayers, I am sure. 

Because we are thinking of the Risen Lord and 
His power to make all things new, I can wish for 
us all nothing better than that we "do all such 
good works" as He has "prepared for us to walk 
in" as we begin that "new life" which is ours be- 
cause we live in HIM. 

Faithfully your friend, 
GRACE LINDLEY, 

Executive Secretary. 



CHURCH PERIODICAL CLUB 



CHURCH Periodical Club has been keeping with 
thankfulness the fifteenth anniversary of 
Miss Mary E. Thomas as its executive secretary. 

The Club says there is need for more subscrip- 
tions to good magazines for the benefit of those 
who cannot afford to subscribe to them, and for 
use in mission schools. 

No libraries at all, and particularly no books, 
in a little field of some 15,000 square miles in the 
Northwest, where the missionary wants to start 
a circulating library for his people. This wide 
region is populated almost entirely by ranchers, 
far apart and many of them wholly cut off from 
the world. Cold weather, deep snow, long winter 
months. "As I make my rounds I hear continu- 
ally the cry for books to read." Church Periodi- 
cal Club says it is amazing how easy it is to build 
up a popular library for such a need, once the need 
is made known and kept in mind until the work 



THE MISSION HERALD 



15 



is done. Perhaps this is the last winter when 
this particular field will be deprived of the 
strength and joy that come from good books. 
Ask the Church Periodical Club, 22 West 48th 
Street, New York City, for address, etc. 




The Portion for Children, Rev. F. J. Scribner, Mac- 
Millan, pp 182. 

Every preacher desires to teach the children of his con- 
gregation not only in the Church School but also through 
the sermon, yet preaching to children is not at all easy 



to do and few have the gift. One of the best helps I have 
yet seen is "The Portion for Children", by Rev. Frank 
J. Scribner. It is a book of talks to children, simple, 
clear and each talk with a single thought of the greatest 
spiritual value. These talks are not sermons for adults 
condensed and with long words omitted, but actual talks 
made by Mr. Scribner to children of his own parish, a 
man most gifted in this particular field of work. 

The 52 talks are mostly built around incidents and ex- 
periences every child knows and understands. Here is 
a wealth of material for the preacher who loves children 
and wants to do his duty by them. 

A few of the talks are, "The Hickory Nuts," "The 
Spider and the Hornet," "The Frozen Radiator," "The 
Three Hardest Words," "The Roller Skates," "The Burn- 
ing Glass." 

All of the talks are intensely interesting to children, 
and then simple and spiritually helpful. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Statement of Amounts Paid on Apportionments for the Church's Program — Diocesan 

and General to July 1st, 1930 



Location 



Parish Apportionment 

PARISHES 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' - __| 100.00 

Ayden, St. James' ... _... 320.00 

Aurora, Holy Cross _ 500.00 

Bath, St. Thomas' _ 100.00 

Beaufort,, St. Paul's 600.00 

Belhaven. St. James' 500.00 

Bonnerton. St. John's 100.00 

Chocowinity, Trinity 100.00 

Clinton. St. Paul's ._ 400.00 

Creswell. St. David's _ 700.00 

Edenton, St. Paul's - 2,500.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church - 2,000.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 400.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's _. 3,300.00 

Fayetteville. St. Joseph's - 200.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's ._ 200.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's ._ 1,200.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's 1,500.00 

Grlfton, St. John's _ 250.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1,000.00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church . 150.00 

Jeasama, Zion 125.00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 1,800.00 

Lake Landine. St. George's 125.00 

New Bern, Christ Church _.'_ 3.000.00 



New Bern, St. Cyprian's 

Plymouth, Grace Church 

Red Spring's, St. Stephen's 

Roper, St. Luke's 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 

Southport, St. Philip's 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's . 

Washington, 

Williamston, 

Wilmington, 

Wilmington, 

Wilmington 

Wilmington. 



400.00 
400.00 
100.00 
350.00 
240.00 
250.00 
60.00 

St. Peter's ... 3,500.00 

Advent 300.00 

Good Shepherd - 300.00 

St. James' 13,380.00 

St. John's . 3,000.00 

St. Mark's 200.00 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 2,000.00 

Windsor. St Thomas' 600.00 

Winton, St. John's 200.00 

Woodville, Grace Church 500.00 



Paid by 
Parishes & 
3h. Schools 

$ 14.33 

24.35 

56.00 

26.50 

216.80 

179.15 

50.00 

13.65 

36.07 

111.07 

1,317.30 

897.18 

16.00 

1,105.22 

51.06 

14.20 

300.00 

840.30 

9.63 

50.00 

175.00 

16.30 

67.12 

200.00 

98.88 

647.25 

254.91 

100.00 

42.00 

150.95 



Relhaven. St. Mary's 
Burlaw, St. Mary's 



ORGANIZED MISSIONS 

105.00 

100.00 



Due to 
July 1st 

$ 35.67 

135.65 

194.00 

23.50 

83.20 

52.85 



46.70 

7.50 

1,461.12 

25.07 

338.27 

6,838.34 

1,347.45 

197.75 

396.99 

53.20 



67.13 



14.00 
33.40 



36.35 
163.93 
238.93 



102.82 
184.00 
544.78 
48.94 
85.80 
300.00 

115.37 

325.00 
58.70 

700.00 

852.75 

100.00 

8.00 

24.05 

120.00 
78.30 
17.50 

288.88 

124.93 



152.55 

603.01 

246.80 
100.00 
182.87 



38.50 
16.60 



Columbia, St. Andrew's 


300.00 


50.00 


100.00 


Edenton, St. John-Evangelist 


150.00 
26.00 * 


80.00 
11.32 




Elizabeth City. St. Philips' 


1.18 


Fairfield, All Saint's 


20.00 
50.00 


20.00 
25.00 




Faison, St. Gabriel's 




Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 


100.00 




50.00 


Kinston, St. Augustine's 


50.00 

100.00 

26.00 


35.00 
59.67 




Lumberton, Trinity 




Maxton, St. Matthew's . 


12 50 


Morehead City, St. Andrew's 


T0.M 


37.42 




North West. All Souls' 


50.00 




25.00 


Oriental, St. Thomas' 


10.00 


10.00 




Pikeville, Mission 


50.00 




25.00 


Roxobel, St. Mark's . 


125.00 

30.00 

200.00 


75.52 
30.00 
50.00 




Sladesville, St. John's 




Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 


50.00 


Sunbury, St. Peter's 


75.00 




37.50 
23.00 


Swan Quarter, Calvary 


60.00 


7.00 


Trenton, Grace Church 


125.00 


74.90 




Warsaw, Calvary 


40.00 




20 00 


Washington, St. Paul's 


150.00 


50.00 


25.00 


Whiteville, Grace Church 


90.00 




45.00 


Winterville, St. Luke's 


200.00 
100.00 


126.00 
51.01 




Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 




Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 


100.00 


50.00 





UNORGANIZED MISSIONS 






Aurora, St. Jude's 


60.00 




25.00 




100.00 


41.65 


8 35 


Beaufort, St. Clement's . 


40.00 


11.00 


9.00 


Greenville, St. Andrew's 


50.00 




25 00 


Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 


65.00 




32.50 




50.00 


23 53 


1.47 
17.00 


Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 


60.00 


8.00 




48.00 


7 90 


16.10 

12.50 

9.39 




25.00 




Roper, St. Ann's 


25.00 


3.11 




30.00 


14 65 


35 


Wilmington, "Brooklyn"', Mission 


15. eo 

20.00 
MISSIONS 


10.00 
10.00 


Wrightsville, St. Augustine's 




PAROCHIAL 




Campbelton, St. Phillip's . 


100.00 


42.07 


7.93 


Kinston, Christ Church _ 


50.00 


30.00 





Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 


45.00 


13.00 


9.50 


Total Apportionments — 1930 


$ 50,303.00 








$ 


25,151.50 


Paid hy Parishes. Missions and Chu 


rch Schools 




18,983.89 



Balance clue to July 1st $ 6,167.61 



16 



THE MISSION HERALD 



Virginia 
Episeopal School 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 

Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
lege and University. Modern 
equipment. Healthy location in 
the mountains of Virginia. Cost 
moderate, made possible through 
generosity of founders. For cat- 
alogue apply to 

Rev. Win. G. Pendleton, 
D. D., Rector 



.;»X < >K ,< X ,, W"X">X"X"X , 'H-K ,4 W~>W««| 




Church Furnishings 

Gold, Silver and Brass 

Church and Chancel 
, Furniture 

Write for Catalogue for 
Episcopal Churches. 

W. & E. Schmidt Co. 

308 Third Street 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



THE 

Bank of Edenton 

SAFETY FOR" SAVINGS 
Bank With Us By Mail 

JULIAN WOOD, President. 
W. 0. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



CHURCH VESTMENTS ; 

Cassocks. Surplices, Stoles 

Embroideries, Clerical Suits, 
Silks, Cloths, Fringes 

HATS, RABATS. COLLARS 

Cox Sons & Vining 

131-133 East 23rd Street 
New York 



NORFOLK-SOUTHERN 

Passenger Schedules 
Effective December 29, 1929, via Norfolk 
Southern Railroad, Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Lv. 12:15 P. M. — Raleigh, New Bern, Golds- 
boro, Beaufort and inter- 
mediate points. 

Lv. 10:25 F. M.— Raleigh, New Bern, Golds- 
boro, Beaufort, Charlotte. 
Fayetteville and intermed- 
iate points. Sleeper to Ra- 
leigh and New Bern. 

Lv. 5 :50 A. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. 

Lv. 2:50 P. M.— Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Connections North 
and West. 
For further information, reservations, etc. 
apply to 

J. H. TUCKER. Ticket Agt. 

Elizabeth City. N. C 




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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 
AND JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter receive her 
education in a church school. 

Rev. Warren W. Way, A.M., D.D., Rector 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 years' college 
work all fully accredited by the Southen Association. Also 
Courses in Music, Art, Expression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. Indoor 
Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback Riding. 

For Catalogue and View Book address 
A. W. Tucker, Business Manager 



fLGEISSLERINC. < 

4j0 SIXTH AVE. NEAR 10 Hi ST. NEW YORK 

Gfturrf? FuraisfmtQB 

IN CARVED WOOD AND fill ' 
MARBLE-BRASS -SILVER H l"l 
FABRICS + WINDOWS ^J [/ 



The Ideal Place for a Dav's Outing or a Summer Vacation 

BAYVIEW— ON-THE-PAMLICO 

19 Miles Below Washington, N. C. 

Splendid Hotel Facilities. Excellent Cuisine. Well Furn- 
ished Rooms. Moderate Rates. 
A FINE BATHING BEACH 
An ideal place to bring the children, where they can wade 

and bathe in perfect safety. 
Spend some time at Bayview while your children are at 

Camp Leach; they are onty a few miles apart 
FINEST DANCE FLOOR IN EASTERN CAROLINA 
Boats for fishing or sailing parties. Make your plans now 

to visit Bayview this Summer. 
Season opens June 6. For Hotel Reservations, Address 

THE BAYVIEW HOTEL, BATH, N. C. 









IS PRINTED BY THE 



Fmnklio Print Shop 



PARTICULAR 
EINTEES 



Colonial Avenue 



Elizabeth City, N. C. 



I 
I 

i 
1 

\ 

I 
1 

y 

j 

y 
x 

9 



<«>.>.>,X«>'K«>«H^-M^">HK'<«W^>>'>'W"!~M">'>H'<"M«>'X->«>'>>'!»X->* 



C_^§3,<n - 



Library U. of N. C. , 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Jan. '29 




O 



V 



A 



o 



v 



VOL. XLIV 



tones 1 






isstnn 

train" 



T5Lrt-^ira-tl)»t^tarrtfj-$ay-cDmf-lRni.22:i7 



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September, 1930 




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The Mission Herald 



SEPTEMBER INDEX Page +***9****4******&&&M&Q*+frM*+Q*+*+*++*f 

% % 

Bishop's Letter | &lt^^k^iJ#^8. I 

Diocesan Conference, inset ^WP^^iK>lill^##w'^P X 

Bishop's Appointments 4 Y ^^ Y 

_-. ,. ' „ * l . X IF IT IS WEATHERLY'S CANDY IT IS GOOD % 

Do You ? 4 X X 

Christian Progress 4 $ W. H. WEATHERLY & COMPANY J 

Significant Statements 4 | ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. I 

At Camp Leach 5 ,^.. > ^^^xkk":">'X~X">'^>->'>«K'^K''K"^>w>^>« 

Habit of Prayer, inset 5 

Voice of the People. Camp Leach 6 ♦*^^>.k«<»X''>h*«k»k-K'<"W'<«k»k«:~x~:~K"><K"K"> 

Mr Nash 7 f ZOFXLERS STUDIO I 

Bishop Rowe and the Quota 7 $ euzabeth city. n. c. | 

•!• Photographs anything, anywhere, anytime, day or nigrht, A 

Chicago s Advance Work 7 ♦,• «iead or aiire £ 

Advance Work 7 ♦!♦ Send Us Your Kodak Films — We Give 24 X 

Missionaries Volunteer 7 % Hours Service Y. 

Editorials . ._ 8 

Varied Work of a Missionary 8 4Km:mW „ >v . w ^ v .w~w~v«w«w^^w^w^~v^w m w~w^w^~v.'«j, 

Christ's Message _____ .9 | H. WEIL & BROS. | 

Egypt 9 y Goldsboro, N. C. |* 

Navajos 9 t k 

From China 9 *** Specialists in apparel for Men, Women and Children * 

A Need of the Present Day Church 9 —*+m*mmmmmm+mw+—6 

In Russia 10 

At The Thompson Orphanage 10 ♦<^X"Xkk^X"X"XK~xK"XKKK~x<~xkk~x~xk~x~> 

Convocation of Colored Workers _ 11 | W. B. THORPE & CO. 

Appeal for Parish House Furnishings 11 X Wilmington, N. C. X 

Field Department, Literature List 11 | (^ oa j an( j Building Material 

Woman's Auxiliary : X "CALL ON US" y 

United Thank Offering 12 W » *< ^^ » » 4^^»x^x«»?«>'>>-X"X».»x>'X''X'<">'X>'X' 

A Woman's Imagination 13 

Urgent Call for Nurse 14 «-X"X-x«x^>x-x^->.>.>.>.xx^>.>.>«^x>«**m 

Red Cross 14 f when in ?i»bet* <**. N " C " | 

n- „ tt, • ji a • + ik A CALL ON X 

Girl s Friendly Society 15 .:. _,. , ~.. . , T ,. . ---, . X 

The Church School influence . _ 15 i First and Citizens National Bank I 

.{, They will be glad to serve you }, 

Financial Statement 15 ? RESOURCES OVER FOUR MILLION DOLLARS £ 

PTNELAND JUNIOR COLLEGE __, 

Salemburg, North Carolina -> y 

„, e -., , . ... . ,-_ ,, Ti7 i V We take pleasure in selling Books. Let us quote y 

Two years of State Accredited College Work y * . , H 

■' & y you on your needs or wishes. y 

Piano, Voice, Art, Expression, Domestic Science, X X 

Bible and Commercial Course * P - W ' MELICK <*• | 

_ »!♦ ELIZABETH CITY. N. C. & 

Also a well equipped high school and elementary * , * 

boarding school for little girls. 

Inter-Denominational ^a^. 

v^X^X"X"X"X"X"X"X•<^|♦♦^Kn"X"XK«X~X"X•'X , 

influences Throughout y tfjTffllf fBIHtfrn £ 

__d_fl 5>K-J_ ff^ttt 

Healthful Surroundings J ^d W^fm3L B9£w y 

Also splendid School for growing girls and Young X _nwU 5m_|3____[ Blj^km ? 

Women — Inexpensive Rates X K^$£fl_H lll^i 1 if ^ l V rfl.. 

Write us before deciding where to send your ■HPfrf^l \%74 m \ZJM0ffltl mj X 

daughter to school. y ^K S | J )S]£mBBftk&ii&m W I 

Salemburg, North Carolina £ ^^^«i SLy-hnSlM-ncP^^ » 

.x«:kkk~x»<kkk«<k*<kkkk~xkkk^kk-x~:»*X''X-:«*>«>^>:' *^«<^k~x~x~xk~xk~:~:«:~x~xkk~^^^^ 



The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, SEPTEMBER, 1930 



No. 9 



Bishop's Letter^ 

My last Bishop's Letter was 
written on June the seventeenth, 
so I will write this letter with a 
brief review o f m y activities 
since that date. 

On Sunday, June the eighth, 
I preached and confirmed seven 
persons in St. Stephen's, Golds- 
boro, in the morning and made an address and 
confirmed five persons in St. George's, Pikeville, 
in the afternoon. 

On Wednesday, the eleventh, I preached at a 
congregational meeting 




beth Conference in London, I have spent the Sum- 
mer with my family at Wrightsville Beach, and, 
while enjoying a much needed rest, I have been 
able to keep in close touch with the work of the 
Diocese. 

One of my very happy engagements during 
July was my visit to our Senior Young People's 
Camp, at Camp Leach, where I had the privilege 
of celebrating the Holy Communion at 8:00 A. M., 
and preaching the closing sermon at 11:00 A. M. 

Camp Leach has wonderful possibilities and I 
commend it to the generous interest of our people. 

On Friday, August the first, I had the privilege, 
assisted by the rector and the Rev. W. R. Noe, 

of conducting a Fare- 



Celebration of the 
Peter's Church, 



of St. Thomas' Mission, 
Ahoskie, at 2:00 P. M., 
preached and confirmed 
four persons i n St. 
Peter's, Sunbury, at 5 
P. M., and officiated at 
the wedding of the Rev. 
R. W. Eastman and 
Miss Isabel Hofler. in 
St. Mary's, Gatesville, 
at 9:00 P. M. 

On Sunday, the fif- 
teenth, I ordained the 
Rev. Thomas H. Wright 
II. to the Priesthood 
and celebrated Holy 
Communion in St. 
James' Church, Wil- 
mington, at 11 :00 A. M. 

On Monday, the six- 
teenth, I preached and 
confirmed one person in 
the Church of the Good 
Shepherd, Tolar - Hart, 
Village, Fayetteville, at 
8:00 P. M. 

On Tuesday, the 
seventeenth, I ordained 
Mr. John Q. Beckwith, 
Jr., t o t h e Diaconate 

and celebrated Holy Communion in Trinity 
Church, Lumberton, at 11:00 A. M. 

On the evening of the seventeenth, I preached 
and confirmed two persons in Christ Church, Hope 
Mills. 

Having given up my plans to attend the Lam- 



DIOCESAN CONFERENCES 

WASHINGTON and CAMP LEACH 

September 23 and 24, 1930 



PROGRAM 



Tuesday, September 23rd. 



Holy Communion, 10:30 A. M., St. 
Washington, N. C. 



C,)aiet Day for the Clergy in St. Peter's Church, from 
11:00 A. M. to 4:00 P. M., with an intermission from 
1:00 to 2:30 P. M., for lunch. 

Conference on the Program of the Woman's Auxiliary, 
4:00 to 5:00 P. M., St. Peter's Parish House. 

Conference on the Diocesan Program for Fall Work, 8:00 
P. M., St. Peter's Parish House. 

Wednesday, September 24th 

Conference on Rural Work, 10:30 A. M., Camp Leach, 
near Washington. 

Basket Lunch on the Grounds, 1:00 P. M. 



Conference on Religious Education, 2:00 to 3:00 P. 
Camp Leach. 



NOTE: 



well Service for Mr. and 
Mrs. George Marshall, 
in the Church of the 
Advent, Williamston. 
Mr. and Mrs. Marshall, 
the latter the daughter 
of the Rev. and Mrs. 
Arthur H. Marshall, 
have sailed for Japan 
where they will serve 
on the staff of St. Paul's 
University, Tokyo. 

On the night of Sun- 
day. August the third, 
I preached in the Union 
Chapel at Wrightsville 
Beach. 

On Monday, the four- 
th, accompanied by the 
Rev. W. R. Noe, I left 
for a week's tour of 
Western North Caro- 
lina. 

Mr. Noe and I visited 
our splendid conference 
center at Kanuga Lake 
for several days and 
then went on to Christ 
School, A r d e n , Valle 
Crucis and other points 
of interest in the Western part of the State. 

On Wednesday, the eighteenth, the Rev. W. R. 
Noe and I met the Building Committee and other 
members of the Congregation of St. Thomas' 
Mission, Ahoskie, at which time definite plans 
were made for the erection of the new Church in 



M., 



-ALL THE PARISHES AND MISSIONS OF 
THE DIOCESE SHOULD BE REPRESENT- 
ED AT THE CONFERENCE ON RURAL 
WORK ON WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24. 



The Mission Heraild 



that progressive town. 

On Sunday, the thirty-first, t preached in St. 
James' Church, Wilmington. 

I am looking forward with hope and confidence 
to our fall and winter work and believe, in spite 
of the prevailing depression, that we will be able 
to go forward with high courage and unfaltering 
faith to the accomplishment of the great work 
committed to our hands. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 

# * * 
PARTIAL LIST OF BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS 

September 21 to November 2 
September 21 — St. Paul's, Greenville. Opening 

service in new Church and Parish House. 
September 23-24 — Clergy and Lay Conference, 

Camp Leach and Washington, N. C. 
September 28 — Service in Elizabethtown, N. C, 

for the purpose of establishing a mission 

in that town. 
October 3 — Meeting of Advisory Committee, Col- 
lege of Preachers, Washington, D. C. 
October 5 — Open. 
October 12— St. Mary's, Kinston, 11:00 A. M. 

Christ Church, East Kinston, 4:00 P. M. 

St. Augustine's, Kinston, 8:00 P. M. 
October 15 — National Commission on Evangelism, 

Boston, Mass. 
October 19 — Church of the Advent, Williannston, 
11:00 A. M. 

Trinity Mission, Bear Grass, afternoon. 

St. Martin's, Hamilton, 8:00 P. M. 
October 26 — St. Mary's, Greensboro. 
November 2 — St. Thomas', Windsor, A. M.. and 
P. M. 

Holy Innocents, Avoca, afternoon. 

* * * 
DO YOU? 

A FATHER recently drew up a list of questions 
and presented them to twelve of his business 
associates, all of whom were fathers and Church- 
men. Results showed, among other things, that 
eight did not know the names of their children's 
Church school teachers, and eleven of the twelve 
never assisted their children in any way in pre- 
paring the Sunday lessons. 

>r % % 

CHRISTIAN PROGRESS 

THE Cathedral in Zanzibar, south-east Africa, 
is built on the site of the old slave market, 
and the high altar stands where the whipping- 
post used to be. 



Significant Statements 

The following brief statements are taken from 
the Resolutions of the Lambeth Conference: 

"We recognize in the modern discoveries of 
science — whereby the boundaries of knowledge 
are extended, the needs of men are satisfied and 
their sufferings alleviated — veritable gifts of God, 
to be used with thankfulness to Him, and with 
that sense of responsibility which such thankful- 
ness must create." 



"Believing as we do that it is through the de- 
votional life that men have advanced in their 
knowledge of God's nature and may hope to pene- 
trate further into His mysteries, we urge upon 
the Church the absolute obligation of Corporate 
worship; and we believe that a further study of 
the Christian Doctrine of God will both strengthen 
this obligation in the Church and also commend it 
to the world." 



"The Conference believes that the conditions 
of modern life call for a fresh statement from the 
Christian Church on the subject of sex. It de- 
clares that the functions of sex as a god-given 
factor in human life are essentially noble and 
creative. Man's responsibility in regard to their 
right use needs the greater emphasis in view of 
widespread laxity of thought and conduct in all 
these matters." 



The Conference believes that in the exalted 
view of marriage taught by Our Lord is to be 
found the solution of the problems with which we 
are faced. His teaching is reinforced by certain 
elements which have been found a new emphasis 
in modern life, particularly the sacredness of 
personality, the more equal partnership of men 
and women, and the biological importance of 
monogamy." 



"The Conference affirms its conviction that all 
communicants without distinction of race or color 
should have access in any church to the Holy 
Table of the Lord, and that no one should be ex- 
cluded from worship in any church on account of 
color or race. Further, it urges that where, ow- 
ing to diversity of language or custom Christians 
of different races normally worship apart, special 
occasions should be sought for united services and 
corporate communion in order to witness to the 
unity of the Bodv of Christ." 



September, 1930 



C/It Camp Leach 

IT gives me a great deal of pleasure to have the 
privilege of explaining our camp this summer 
to the people of the Diocese. Camp life was not 
only two of the happiest weeks in my life but a 
great inspiration to me and I do hope this article 
will give the people some idea of what Camp Leach 
has meant to us. 

We generally draw conclusions from first im- 
pressions so 1 shall begin with my impression of 
Camp the first day. 

I arrived late in the afternoon and much to my 
surprise I found a beautiful 
spot on the Pamlico River, 
an ideal place for a camp. 
We were warned beforehand 
of what to expect. They told 
us to prepare for the rough 
and tough edges of open air 
living but I do not think we 
found this at all. The girls 
and the boys were given 
modern type barracks with 
far more conveniences than 
we anticipated. Naturally I 
drew a good conclusion of 
the place and camp, but from 
this, and to my mind more 
important, that night I met 
some eighty boys and girls 
from all over the Diocese and 
knew that before camp clos- 
ed everyone would be a per- 
sonal friend. After Taps I 
lay in bed, and thought of 
the great time in front of me 
for these two weeks. 

The following morning the 
schedule was announced and 
groups arranged. W e had 
enough boys for two groups 
and enough girls for four. 

We found that we would compete in all activities 
and at the end of camp the best group would re- 
ceive a cup. What could be more inducement to 
work? Therefore competition was keen, for the 
entire two weeks. 

Every morning we rose at six-thirty for a cool 
morning dip. At seven-thirty we filed in for a 
very delightful breakfast. At eight o'clock we 
rushed to our barracks to clean up for inspection. 
I am sure mothers would have love to have seen 
their sons and daughters making up beds, sweep- 
ing floors, and cleaning generally. Much to my 
surprise I found myself, several times, under the 
bed looking for particles of dirt. Even I had a 



THE HABIT OF PRAYER 



Fifteen years ago a young Japanese 
girl went out from her Christian 
home in a small country town to be 
the bride of a rich man near Yoko- 
hama. Her mother-in-law and the 
rest of her new family were antagon- 
istic. Her Bible and Prayer Book 
were taken away; she was never al- 
lowed the Sacraments or any worship 
except "on rare visits to her home. 
She lived in an atmosphere of jeal- 
ousy and petty hatred. 

She accepted and obeyed the tra- 
ditional loyalty of a bride to her new 
family, but under it, or over it, the 
habit of prayer persisted ; she lived 
with them in patience and kindness, 
and after thirteen years she appeared 
at a Sunday school to enroll her two 
children, and the old mother-in-law 
herself escorted them each day. Two 
years later, an inquirers' class had 
been instituted in that very home, 
and the old woman and the husband 
were both attending. 

— From The Living Church 



smile on my face. Why. I could not say, unless 
this work was real pleasure. At eight-thirty the 
faculty inspected and complimented us on the 
spirit in which our work was done. 

From nine to twelve we had five classes: "The 
Life of Christ", taught by Rev. Worth Wicker; 
"Personal Religion", by Rev. W. A. Lillycrop; 
"Young People's Service League", by Rev. I. deL. 
Brayshaw: "Prayer Book", by Rev. William 
Vache ; "The Church's Program", by Rev. W. R. 
Noe. 

These classes were taught by men who set an 
example of Christian Manhood which every camp- 
er would long t o attain. 
Their classes were very in- 
teresting and we looked for- 
ward to them with great 
zeal. 

At twelve-thirty, dinner 
was served. From one-thirty 
until two-thirty quiet hour 
was observed. Quiet Hour 
was one of the best in the 
schedule for we had time to 
rest, write home and plan for 
different events. 

At two-thirty we had Ath- 
letics of all kinds and I must 
say t h at in the different 
games I have never played 
with a cleaner set of athletes 
in my life. Every moment 
of these contests was fine, 
wholesome sport. Everyone 
was in for a good time and 
had it. After Athletics we 
rushed for the water and had 
a delightful swim. Supper 
was the next thought and 
after Supper, Vespers. 

The twilight service by the 

river, a service which was 

led by a camper, was one 

which inspired us more than anything else. Each 

evening we listened to a sermon by one of the 

clergy and one which impressed us. 

At eight o'clock we had the evening perfor- 
mance. Pageants, shows, plays, tricks, stunts, 
jokes, etc., in which all of us took part. After 
that some looked for the moon while others en- 
Joyed everybody else. And at ten-thirty we were 
ready for bed. 

Now that I have explained the schedule and 
what activities took place, just what did I gain 
by going to camp? 

1. I was under the leadership of men of ideal 
Christian Manhood for two weeks. 



The Mission Herald 



2. I have gained a pergonal friend in practi- 
cally every parish in the Diocese. 

3. I realize that our ministers are not just 
men to give instruction, but are human beings 
and real pals. 

4. I know a great deal more about the Life 
of Christ, understand the fundamentals of Per- 
sonal Religion, The Church's Program, The Y. P. 
S. L. and the Prayer Book. 

5. I received a great deal of Public Speaking 
experience and know something of Dramatics. 

6. I gained nine pounds of flesh. 

7. Last but not least, I had the finest, cleanest 
and happiest vacation of my life. 

JAMES D. BECKWITH 
* * * 

Voice of TGhe People 

Camp Leach 

No one, not even the newspaper man, has asked 
me to write about Camp Leach. But then he 
didn't know that I was to be at the Pageant on 
Saturday night nor to the service there on Sun- 
day of last week and no one else knew that I was 
so filled to the brim and overflowing with appre- 
ciation for the wonderful kind of entertainment 
there that T was obliged to tell it. 

They are teaching loyalty, the power of fun, 
sympathy and unselfish devotion to duty in the 
most pleasant manner possible. And above all 
else they are laying stress on the achievement of 




View nt Camp Leach 

"Peace and Coodwill to All" by helping the young 
people find a work for themselves in the building 
of God's Kingdom. 

At the Pageant on Saturday night a great deal 
of fun was had in seeing the famous Captain Teach 
bow to the power of a domineering wife in almost 
the same way as "Jiggs does to Maggie." 



While I verily beleve that old Teach's last wife 
(one that was said to have been such a good wo- 
man that she married him to reform him) would 
have gone the same as the other twelve if Teach's 
own sins hadn't caught up with him, it surely 
was some show to see him afraid of his wife. 




View at Camp Leach 

The beautiful outdoor chapel where the services 
were held Sunday has in itself enough beauty for 
one to dream of heavenly things by just having 
the opportunity of being able to use one's eyes 
there. When the Bishop preached such a won- 
derful sermon on "The Master has come and call- 
eth for thee," it would take one that had com- 
pletely hedged himself in with selfishness to not 
resolve to, in some way, take up the work that 
God expects of him,. 

Then the dinner, the meeting of old friends and 
the finding of new ones was quite a privilege ; and 
to hear the children singing, "I Don't Want to Go 
Home! I Don't Want to Go Home," in such a 
cheerful manner makes us feel assured that many 
a one will take home some of the good cheer and 
keep it growing — somewhere, somehow, — until it 
finally reach around the world and the peace that 
men have fought and died for will be found by 
service to our fellow man in the way that Christ 
intended it should. 

— Washington Daily News. 
* * * 

Faison, N. C., July 30, 1930 
Dear Mrs. Adams : 

Let me thank the Auxiliary through you for 
giving me the. scholarship to Camp Leach. I do 
appreciate their sending me. 

It was a fine place. We had a grand time. I 
never had a better time. 

With thanks to you and the other ladies. 
Sincerely, 
CATHERINE THOMPSON 



September.. 1930 



MR. NASH 

AS so often happens, the death of a worker, in 
spite of the very great loss of his presence, 
seems to release new forces Of work. Mr. Sam 
Nash, of Tarboro, North Carolina, who died last 
May, was a lay missionary who for more than 
fifty years had given himself wholly t o the 
Church's work in eastern North Carolina. The 
sketch of his life and work, by the Rev. Bertram 
Brown, of Tarboro. which appeared in the South- 
ern Churchman for June 21, is worth keeping as 
a biography of a modern Christian hero. 

Now we learn that since Mr.. Nash's death one 
of his missions has been taken over by the man- 
ager of the local telephone company, who never 
did any such work before. He goes out every 
Sunday, and has developed the gift of making 
addresses, much to his delight and surprise. 

Another of the missions cared for by Mr. Nash 
has been taken over by a young farmer, Mr. 
Nash's godson. (Mr. Nash was godfather to 347 
persons.) This young man went off to college 
and studied agriculture; then, strange to say, 
came back to his father's plantation, applied sci- 
entfic knowledge to farm problems, and revolu- 
tionized the industry in his community. Now he 
has combined Christian work with his farm work, 
all because Mr. Nash wanted him to carry on his 
mission. 

* * * 

BISHOP ROWE AMD THE QUOTA 

ESHOP ROWE addresses some plain remarks 
to his own missionary staff on the subject of 
the quota. "May I suggest," he says, "that in 
1930 you will please make it a matter of conscience 
to raise your offering for the quota as early in 
the year as possible". 

"If your people are made acquainted with the 
quota and what it means, I feel that they will glad- 
ly respond. It is a matter of education, a chal- 
lenge to come to the help of the Lord. Delin- 
quency towards such an object is a crime. There 
is no place here for indifference or selfishness, as 
there is no place for discouragement or despair." 

Alaska more than met its quota of $1,500 last 
year, as in the years past. 

# # * 
CHICAGO'S ADVANCE WORK 

THE present old buildings of St. Stephen's Chi- 
nese Mission in Manila provide for 250 pupils 
at the outside limit, and the school has about 370. 
Worse still is the need of a new church, for the 
present one. long since outgrown, holds about 140 
and should have room for 500. 



The mission now owns new property, long await- and 



ed, and the Chinese comjmunity is to erect a new 
school as a memorial to the late Mrs. Hobart Stud- 
ley, who worked there for nearly thirty years. 
The Rev. Hobart Studley is priest in charge of the 
mission. The new church is one of the Advance 
Work projects and one of the longest standing of 
present needs. 

Later: Cheers! Chicago is providing this 
church. 

-r^ *r -5* 

ADVANCE WORK 

A VARIED assortment of the Advance Work 
is being undertaken by the diocese of Chica- 
go : new work in the Liberian hinterland ; land, 
building and equipment for the Calumet district 
of Northern Indiana ; new rectory for the mission 
at Tochigi, district of North Tokyo, where living 
conditions for foreigners have been difficult; re- 
pairs and improvements for the Church's farther- 
est inland mission in China, at Ichang, where such 
improvements are essential for the continuance 
of the work; S25,000 for the chapel at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois; new church for St. Stephen's 
Chinese Mission in Manila. Also, an additional 
S5.000 for maintenance of the Chicago building 
at St. Paul's School for Negroes. Lawrenceville, 
Va., the building erected recently by the diocese 
of Chicago. 

* * * 

MISSIONARIES VOLUNTEER 

FOR the first time in the history of the parish 
of the Church of the Advent, Williamston, N. 
C, established in the year 1852, workers for a 
foreign field offered themselves here at a service 
conducted by Bishop Thomas C. Darst, assisted by 
the Rev. W. R. Noe, of Wilmington, and the Rev. 
Arthur H. Marshall, rector of the parish. Mr. 
and Mrs. George H. Marshall, who have been 
teaching in Ohio for the past year, have accepted 
in St. Paul's University, Tokyo, Japan, and will 
remain here for two weeks before going to Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, where they will book for the Orient 
on the steamship "President Taft" sailing from 
San Francisco, August 29th, going via Honolulu. 
Mrs. Marshall is a daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. 
Arthur H. Marshall and has won success in the 
teaching of public school music; Mr. Marshall 
will teach athletics and have under him in Tokyo 
seven coaches. Their contract will extend over a 
period of five years. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall will 
add much to the number of workers sent out from 
East Carolina to Alaska, Porto Rico, China and 
Japan. While in Williamston they have made 
many friends who appreciate the fact that they 
chose to go out from the local parish to spend 
be spent in the larger work in foreign fields. 



The Mission Herald 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 
ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription §1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 

addresses. 

1" 'S- T* 

CAMP LEACH 

CAMP LEACH has proved more successful than 
one could have wished. It has more than 
proved its worth to the diocese. Tt will yet prove 
of greater worth as the years pass by. Coopera- 
tion of every part of the diocese is essential in 
this project for the advancement of the diocese. 
The Camp is still in its infancy and needs many 
modern improvements. It is hoped that some 
generous friends will make it possible to make 
these improvements before the Camp is used next 
summer. It is also hoped that next summer will 
see every parish and mission with representatives 
in camp. 

CLERGY CONFERENCE 

TO every one who attended the last Clergy 
Conference at Wrightsville, there was left a 
heart hunger for another. That other will be 
held at Washington, September 23. These con- 
ferences are of inestimable value and it is hoped 
that every clergyman of the diocese will be 
present. 

"A WOMAN'S IMAGINATION" 

THOUGH "A Woman's Imagination" is found 
in this issue in the Woman's Department it 
will well repay every male reader to read it 
through. To say that Bishop Slattery wrote it 
is sufficient to prove its worth. Men, read it! 



AN UNWANTED DUTY 

BEGINNING with the November number of the 
Mission Herald the editor is called upon to do 
a thing he does not want to do, and would not do 
were it not required by the Post Office Depart- 
ment. The Federal Government permits a very 
limited number of unpaid copies of a magazine to 
be mailed. This means that the November issue 
will not be mailed to those whose subscriptions 
are still unpaid on the 10th of November. 

You will find when your subscription expires 
where you find your name printed. For example, 
"Mrs. A. B. C. May 30," means that her sub- 
scription expired May 1930. $1.00 should there- 
fore be sent to pay up to May 1931. However, if 
on noting your expiration date you doubt its ac- 
curacy, write to the editor at once and he will 
make proper adjustment gladly. 

The winter numbers of the Mission Herald will 
contain material of great value to every parish 
and mission and should be in the hands of every 
family of the docese. Will you get your copy? 

**- *t. -a. 

-p. Sfi -t. 

VARIED WORK OF A MISSIONARY 

AT the House of Bethany, Cape Mount, Liberia, 
when a girl is married, after having finished 
school and taught for the mission two years, Miss 
Ridgeley gives the bride away and this is no more 
formality. She gives her bedding, kitchen out- 
fits, abundant clothes. More, Miss Ridgeley must 
thereafter keep the peace between man and wife. 
It is a tradition of the House that in one case 
when a man and his wife quarreled over a second 
woman. Miss Ridgeley, preparing for the palaver 
about' it, prayed earnestly that "whatever hinder- 
ed the peace of this marriage might be removed," 
and the unnecessary woman actually died the 
next day. 

A man whom Miss Ridgeley reproved for beat- 
ing his Mdfe said, "If I don't beat her what can I 
do to make her mind me? If you will tell me any 
other way, I will try it." 

It is also a part of the traditional procedure 
that the bride chooses the hymns for her wedding, 
and one not long ago chose "What'er my God or- 
dains is right" and "Come, ye disconsolate." 

It is not really a funny story. The approach of 
a marriage in many, many cases is a tragic reality, 
compounded of fear of the unknown and certainty 
of the known. Out of the security of the mission 
home where, however crude and simple, she has 
been a person and a soul, she goes back into her 
race, where every woman is a piece of property 
belonging to some one. chief, brother, husband. 
Married, her husband may treat her as a slave, 
or beat her, or bring other women in as her equals 
or superiors. —General church Bulletin 



September, 1930 



ONE THEATRE 

A LARGE motion picture theatre in a residen- 
tial district outside Philadelphia appeared 
on Ash Wednesday with its billboards stripped 
bare, and in the space where the features is usu- 
ally advertised were the words, CLOSED FOR 
THE LENTEN SEASON. 

^ 5fC 5p 

CHRIST'S MESSAGE 



"For I delivered unto you 
That which I also received". 

If I deliver Christ's message, 
'Tis proof that we have believed. 

Unless we share in the building 
Of God's Kingdom here below, 

We will never know His glory — 
We will never feel the glow. 

For the message was intended 

To be taken by us all, 
Just as soon as we have learned it. 

We must heed the loving call. 

Sometime we will see the glory, 

When Christ comes to claim His own, 

There'll be joy, good-will and gladness — 
Heavenly music 'round the Throne. 

— Mrs. J. P. Bragg. 

* * * 

"All nations, languages, colors and races are 
represented here," writes the rector of a New 
York City parish, "including even a goodly number 
of native American stock. We reach the poor 
of the neighborhood mainly through our Church 
school and our clinic." 

* & * 

EGYPT 

ALINE of bonfires two thousand miles long has 
been used in Egypt by the governing official 
of one region, to keep out the locust swarms, and 
proved effective. Locusts have recently been so 
thick as to have stopped railway traffic at one 



point i n Egypt. In Transjordan, seventy-five 
thousand men have been working day and night, 
collecting tons of locusts and tons of eggs, and 
plowing up hundreds of acres where eggs had been 
laid, in a feverish attempt to stop the advancing 
tide of locusts which are reported as having al- 
ready destroyed huge areas of crops. The Book 
of Joel takes on a new vividness at such a time. 

>f: ^ >!< 

NAVAJOS 

BETTER than the statement published a while 
ago that the Navajo Indians build their ho- 
gans facing the East to keep out the evil spirit, is 
a little legend just received from Arizona, that a 
wonderful man once visited the Navajos, long, 
long ago, revealed wonderful things to them, as- 
cended, and told them he would return some day, 
and they would see him in the rising sun. So 
their doors face the East, that they may surely 
see him when he comes. 

A modern Indian, alas, says it is just in order to 
get all the morning sunlight, but the age-old sym- 
bolism between the rising sun and the Sun of 
Righteousness is too deeply embedded in human 
thought for him to demolish. 

sfc >N sfc 

FROM CHINA 

WORD was received late in June that the Rev. 
Fung Mei-ts'en, priest of the district of 
Hankow, was murdered on April 22, by comimun- 
ists outside the town of Chuho where he was in 
charge of the mission. The Christians of Chuho 
had taken refuge in the church when the town was 
attacked on April 16; Mr. Fung had refused to 
leave his flock to save his life, standing up boldly 
when the clergyman was asked for, and in trying 
to protect the others, he was seized and carried 
away, and then wantonly killed, on Tuesday in 
Easter week. 

He was born in 1879, baptized in 1907, and as 
catechist, deacon and priest, he served the Church 
for twenty years. He had three sons, one of 
whom is a student in St. Michael's School, Wu- 
chang. 

On Good Friday, two days after his capture, 



C/I Need of £he Present Day Church^c) 



WHAT the Twentieth Century Church needs 
is a great, pastive conviction and not ne- 
gations. A genuine revival will not come in the 
modern Church until we possess the same over- 
whelming, dominant convictions about Jesus 
Christ which possessed the souls of the first Chris- 
tians. The missionary enterprise of the Church, 



whose nerves has been cut by the denials and ne- 
gations of a skeptical yet influential minority, will 
not regain its power until our souls are possessed 
with the conviction of the first Christians, that 
Jesus Christ and His gospel are indispensable to 
the salvation of the world. 

— Christian Evangelist 



10 



The Mission Herald 



he wrote Bishop Roots a letter, translated as fol- 
lows: 

My Dear Bishop Roots: 

1 write reverently to you at this time. I, Mei, 
was seized on the 16th day of this month by the 
county official of the Soviet government. The 
chairman of their executive committee said to me, 
"Mei-ts'en, you are a preacher of the Gospel in 
the Sheng Kung Hui and therefore you are one of 
the corrupt gentry." He would not let me plead 
my cause. They have condemfned me to be shot 
on the nineteenth. 

I, Mei, have perfect peace in my heart, but, 
Bishop, 1 want you to think of me as giving my 
life as a sacrifice for the sake of the Gospel. With 
regard to my aged father, and my wife and my 
two younger sons, I ask that you take them under 
your special care and protection. As for the other 
things that I would like to tell you, I am not given 
an opportunity. This letter knocks at your door 
to ask after your welfare. 

Respectfully presented, 

(Signed) FUNG MEI-TS'EN 

* * '■¥■ 

IN RUSSIA 

AT present neither the importation nor the 
publication of Bibles in Russia seems to be 
allowed by the government. For more than a 
hundred years, from 1806, the British and Foreign 
Bible Society published and circulated the Scrip- 
tures in Russia. After the revolution, the work 
became increasingly difficult; by 1919 the stock 
in Petrograd was exhausted and could not be re- 
plenished. A few issues have been printed, but 
since 1928 all the information obtainable indicates 
that the importation of Scriptures into Russia is 
effectually prohibited, and permission for the pub- 
lication within Russia cannot be secured. In Eu- 
rope some persons have tried to send Bibles across 
the border by mail but few have arrived and many 
have been returned to the senders. 

"Those who are familiar with the history of the 
circulation of the Scriptures in times of perse- 
cution," says the American Bible Society Record, 
"have little doubt that the copies of the Scriptures 
that are in Russian hands are more eagerly read 
and prized than ever. . . They will also re- 
member that such prohibitions upon the circula- 
tion of the Scriptures have eventually been dis- 
carded. How far away or how near that time is 
in Russia, the wise man will not prophesy. But 
it will surely come, and come out of the influences 
which the Bible itself has created, fostered, and 
guided in Russia. Meanwhile, the Bible Socie- 
ties eagerly watch for the time and the occasion." 



AT THE THOMPSON ORPHANAGE 

VACATION time at the Orphanage is a happy 
mixture of work and play. All of the ma- 
trons and some of the children go away for a 
month or two weeks vacation. Our two patrols 
of Boy Scouts spent a very happy two weeks at 
Camp Steere, The Boy Scout Camp on the Catawba 
River. The Girl Reserves had a very pleasant 
time at Camp Latta. Many picnics and parties 
have been enjoyed. Early in June St. Peter's 
boys, and one for the girls, and one for the little 
Service League gave three picnics, one for the 
children of the Baby Cottage. On the Fourth of 
July, David Yates ran off a tennis tournament 
and field meet culminating in a picnic supper out 
in a field back of the Orphanage at the close of the 
day. Also each week Mr. Yates holds gym class- 
es for the girls and boys on Saturday afternoons, 
and a Vesper Song Service on Tuesday evenings 
on the steps of the Administration Building. Mr. 
Yates also engineered the annual picnic at West 
Lake Park, one of the big events of the summer, 
and the annual Stunt Night held in the Auditori- 
um of the Administration Building, at which time 
the children present original stunts, and some- 
times display considerable ingenuity and ability. 
One of the very pleasantest things of the summer 
time is having Mr. Yates home with us again and 
the happiness he brings into all these good times. 

The Young Men's Club of Charlotte gave the 
children an afternoon party at the Sphinx Club. 
This was a very happy occasion and was an un- 
usual thing for these young boys to do, as their 
efforts usually are confined to dances and various 
plans for their own personal enjoyment. 

The Eev. Thomas B. "Noe and Mrs. Noe, and a 
truck full of girls from the Church Home at York 
paid us a pleasant visit early in August. This 
truck was a gift to the Church Home, and with it 
Mr. Noe takes those children on short trips, who 
otherwise would have no vacation trips whatever. 

A watermelon party was given the children by 
the members of the Men's Bible Class of St. John's 
Baptist Church, Charlotte. The Pastor and many 
of the men were present and seemed to have as 
good a time as the children, which is saying a 
great deal. 

Two sessions of the Inter-Parochial Bible Class 
were held in the auditorium of the Administration 
Building, speakers being the Rev. Conrad Good- 
win of Charleston. South Carolina, and Bishop 
Penick, of Charlotte. About seventy-five men 
fromi the Episcopal Churches of the city attended 
rhese meetings. 



September, 1930 



11 



One of our girls, Edith Pace, who graduated 
from St. Peter's Training School for Nurses this 
year has been in charge of the infirmary during 
the absence of the regular nurse, Miss Robinson. 
During this time a dozen children have had their 
tonsils and adenoids removed. The doctors have 
all declared that Edith has presided with unusual 
skill and ability. This praise of one of our girls 
naturally gives us a great deal of satisfaction. 
At this writing the children are getting ready to 
start back to school, and are looking forward to 
.a happy and successful year. 

* * * 

CONVOCATION OF COLORED CHURCH 

WORKERS 

(Rev. J. E. Holder) 

THE twenty-first annual meeting of the Con- 
vocation of Colored Church Workers in the 
Diocese of East Carolina was held at the 
Church of St. John the Evangelist at Edenton, 
June 14 to 16 with the Dean, the Rev. S. N. Grif- 
fith in the chair. The opening session on Satur- 
day 14th, had the honor of the presence of Dr. 
R. B. Drane, for over 40 years Rector of St. Paul's 
in the same town. He delivered an address of 
wonderful historic value, and a rising vote of 
thanks was accorded him. The Holy Commjunion 
was celebrated twice on Sunday and again on 
Monday morning. The preachers on Sunday were 
the Rev. 0. J. McLeod of Goldsboro, in the morn- 
ing and the Rev. R. I. Johnson at night. A Sun- 
day afternoon discussion of the subject, Religious 
Education, was led by the Rev. J. W. Herritage, 
of Fayetteville. 

On Monday morning, the Rev. Walter R. Noe 
Diocesan Secretary, his brother, the Rev. A. C. D. 
Noe, of Farmville, and again Dr. Drane, were pres- 
ent and each contributed a "word" to the business 
of the session. The Diocesan Secretary brought 
word of regret from Bishop Darst for his unavoid- 
able absence, and himself addressed the meeting 
with stirring warmth urging consecration, faith 
and earnestness. The Convocation rang through- 
out with evidences of determination of visions of 
a better day at hand. 

The Woman's Auxiliary, under the presidency 
of Mrs. R. I. Johnson, was accorded, as usual, the 
control of the afternoon and closing sessions on 
Monday, and filled these periods with a pile of 
keep-awake business and activities, winding up at 
night with an interesting and instructive page- 
ant. 

The Convocation accepted the invitation of St. 
Augustine's Church, Kinston, the home Church of 
the Secretary, to hold next year's Convocation 
there. 



APPEAL FOR PARISH HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

During the ten and a half years I have been 
here in charge of our St. Augustine's Mission, 
I have used my house for everything which calls 
for a parish house or a hall or a school room- 
Remodeling my home seven years ago, I particu- 
lary made my dining room larger than otherwise 
needed for the accomodation of all such things. 
I have now gone a little further, seeing no parish 
house in near future, and added an annex to my 
house, of dimensions of a moderate sized hall, for 
the purpose of better taking care of these out- 
side church activities, and which is to be known as 
"The St. Augustine's Parish Room". 

My appeal is with regard to its furnishing, 
There are several things we shall provide our- 
selves, but we desire to ask the gift of five dozen 
folding chairs which can be obtained here in 
Kinston at $14.50 a dozen, and also of a small 
second hand organ. I hope the Herald will carry 
this appeal even outside the Diocese, making sure 
that our hopes will be realized and more, for we 
can make use of more than we have dared to ask 
for here ; for instance, should I receive two organs 
one will go to another Mission I have charge of, 
St. Stephen's at Haddock's Cross Roads, where we 
need an organ badly. Everything received in 
response to this appeal, will be promptly acknowl- 
edged by mail and also in the columns of the 
Herald. 

REV. JAS. E. HOLDER, 

Missionary at Kinston, N. C 
* * * 

FIELD DEPARTMENT (LITERATURE LIST) 
General Church Program— 1929-30-31 

EVERY MEMBER CANVASS 

Financial Pledge Card — 2051. 

Parish Finance Chart (Analysis of Receipts and 
Disbursements) 30c per 100 — 2117. 

Parish Finance Chart (Analysis of Pledges In- 
come) 30c per 100—2118. 

A Parson's Handbook — 2121. 

Every Member Canvass — Before, During, and Af- 
ter— 2130. 

An Adventure of God in Two Churches (exemplifi- 
cation of the Every Member Canvass) — 2145. 
"A NEW DAY" (general folder)— 2148. 
Graphs : 

a. Trends of Giving by General Church to 
apply on the quota for General Work, 
$2.00 per 100. 

b. Trends of Giving by Diocese on quota a 
graph for each diocese — $2.00 per 100. 



12 



The Mission Herald 



c. Trends in Giving — Contributions of the 
General Church for all purposes — $2.00 
per 100. 

d. Trends in Giving — National Church per 
capita — $2.00 per 100. 

TEXT BOOKS: 

Speaker's Manual — 15c each — 2138. 

Our Common Life (Stewardship) — 50c each — 

2143. 
Life and Religion (Outline of Our Common Life) 

by L. B. Franklin. D. C. L.— 25c each— 2151. 
Our Expanding Church (fall study book) — 25c 

each— 2149. 

PARISH ORGANIZATION 

Small facsimile of Organization Chart (see below) 

—50c per 100—2126. 
Group Discussion — 2125. 
Bulletin 12 — Parish Program Conferences. 
Bulletin 40 — Group Organization in the Parish. 
Bulletin 52 — The Parish Organized for Service. 

INFORMATION LEAFLETS: 

Budget Dollar— Triennium 1929-31—2146. 
Gleams— 2150. 

PARISH CONFERENCES 

Guide to Leaders of Parish Conferences on the 

Church's Mission— 2092. 
How to Prepare for Parish Conferences on the 

Church's Mission— 2093. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Prayer Leaflet — published monthly — 50c one copy 

per year; 40c five copies to one address; 35c 

ten copies or more; $1.00 fifty copies of one 

issue. 

Bible Readings and Prayers — 2028. 

Opening Service (for Preaching Missions) — 50c 

per 100; $4.50 per 1.000—2110. 
Prayer Card— 2122. 

A Parish Institute on the Church's Mission — 2123. 
Concerning Appeals for Designated and Special 

Gifts— 2133. 
MAPS — set of two — one of the United States and 
one of the World. Wall size — 60c. 
Missionary Map of Anglican Communion 98 
x 41"— price $3.75. 
CHARTS — Parish Finance — wall size, enlarge- 
ment of 2117 and 2118— set of two— 60c 
GRAPHS — Showing Diocesan Giving for all pur- 
poses and Diocesan Payment on Quota, siz« 
30 x 50"— price $1.75. 
Orders for this literature should be sent to Dio- 
cesan Headquarters — 507 Southern Building, Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

WALTER R. NOE, 
Executive Secretary. 



t A 

Y Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. jt 

X I 

„t. Publicity Chairman ,j, 



Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. 



United Thank Offering, 

(Mrs. Foy A. Sawyer) 

WITH this nice, cool weather our thoughts 
turn to other things than striving to be 
comfortable, though hot, and we realize that fall 
is just around the corner, with vacation-time about 
ovei\ Our plans for activities of all sorts being 
to form in our minds, and, as we look back over 
the summer, how very thankful we must feel for 
ills escaped and mercies enjoyed ! How better ex- 
press our grateful thanks than by remembering 
our Little Blue Boxes, the beautiful medium of 
showing gratitude by becoming God's partners in 
serving humanity ? 

With the very first meeting of your Auxiliary 
in September, definitely remind the women of the 
fall United Thank Offering, begging that they will 
not reject the wonderful privilege of constantly 
using the Little Blue Box, prayerfully and gener- 
ously. 

Remember, our spring U. T. O. was $245.43 
less than the spring of 1929, so we must make an 
extra effort not to forget our Father's daily bless- 
ings, this fall, and more than make up the defici- 
ency. The spring, 1930, U. T. O. ambunted to 
$1,779.57. Please lose no time in seeing that 
every woman, young and old, is supplied with a 
Blue Box. 

Soon you will receive information about the 
October Spirit of Missions, which is to be a United 
Thank Offering number, and I hope you will see 
that this number is placed in as many hands as 
possible. The informing material thus made 
available will no doubt bring splendid results. 

If each one of us does her part in the capacity 
of U. T. O. Treasurer, every woman in every parish 
will have an opportunity to be a silent and power- 
ful missionary. 

My books will close for the fall Offering on 
December 31st, so my report can be gotten ready 
for Convention in January. On June 30th they 
will close for the spring Offering. Whatever date 
you set for the presentation of the Offering, please 
don't delay in sending it to me longer than neces- 
sary. It is just as easy to be prompt. 

I am at your service, always, and want you to 
call on me for any assistance I may be able to give 
you, and I ask your earnest prayers that I may 
faithfully serve and grow in grace and efficiency. 






September, 1930 



G/4 Woman's Imagination 

(Rt. Rev. C. L. Slattery, D. D.) 

(~T\ AVID, hard pressed and weary, said one day 
JLx to some friends that he longed for a drink 
of water from the well at Bethlehem. These 
friends, at the risk of their lives, brought back 
to him a cup of water from the home of his boy- 
hood. David was so deeply moved by their love 
that he could not drink the water ; for it had been 
made sacred by their sacrifice. So he poured it 
out to the Lord. David and his men had imagina- 
tion. 

Centuries later a woman perceived our Saviour's 
loneliness, and, with woman's instinct, feeling that 
tragedy loomed before Him, showed her sympathy 
and her adoration, not by words, but by breaking 
her most precious treasure and pouring the oint- 
ment of spikenard on His head. Our Lord, deeply 
moved, was strengthened for His own impending 
saclifice. He blessed the woman for her imagina- 
tion. 

Now, in our day, the women of the Church, year 
by year, do more than they are asked to do, and, 
of their own free will, make lavish gifts for the 
work of Christ in the world. They see that there 
are deeds which the Church might do, if only 
Christ could have in our time what the water from 
Bethlehem meant to David, what the breaking of 
the alabaster box of ointment meant to Jesus of 
Nazareth in the days of His flesh. They have 
that same glorious gift of imagination. 

In my Minnesota parish there was a woman of 
fine character and benevolence • who refused to 
have anything to do with missions. I believe that 
she had had a rich aunt from whom she had ex- 
pected a substantial legacy; every penny of that 
aunt's property was bequeathed to foreign mis- 
sions. My parishioner felt that her family had 
done all that was necessary for missions. Her 
disappointment kindled her prejudices and she 
would go to no meeting of the Woman's Auxiliary, 
she would not even go to church on a missionary 
Sunday. One day I met this woman on the street. 
She stopped me to tell me of the plight of her 
grandchildren who lived in a South Dakota town, 
where there was no Episcopal Church. She shiv- 
ered as she spoke of the calamity of her grand- 
children's growing up in a community without 
the privileges of the worship and teaching of the 
Church which she loved. Then she looked appeal- 
ingly at me, and said, "Do you suppose the Ca- 
thedral could do anything to help my daughter 
start a church in Sisseton?" Instantly I answer- 
ed, "Of course we could; but you know, don't you, 
that that would be missions?" "You don't mean 



13 



that missions is like that!" she exclaimed. Her 
imagination was opened, and from that day till 
she died, she was an enthusiast for the missionary 
cause. 

So far as we read history we know that all that 
is best in our civilization is due to the missionar- 
ies, who, from St. Paul's day onward, brought the 
spirit of Christ into Europe, first into the Mediter- 
ranean world and then into the woods of the north- 
ern wilderness, where most of our ancestors lived. 
There is much of our civilization of which we can- 
not be proud; but we can rightly rejoice in all 
that is Christlike. That is the part which we 
strive to pass on to our children. In so far as 
we value it, how can we be so selfish as to be satis- 
fied to keep it for ourselves alone? If we believe 
that we are brothers to all the world, how can we 
dare to wrap our talent in a napkin and bury it 
in our own immediate neighborhood? We need 
imagination. 

When 1 hear men speculating about the possi- 
bility of war between America and Japan, I think 
of one of my dear friends who is a Christian min- 
ister in Japan. I can not think that the nation 
which he loves should ever fight with the nation 
which I love. When we teach a people who does 
not know Christ to enter into the joy of His fel- 
lowship we bind that people to ourselves with 
links stronger than links of steel. We tend to 
make the hideous jealousies and misunderstand- 
ings which lead to war impossible. We are alive 
and together in the love of the same Christ. 
Statesmen ought to have imagination when they 
think of the international power of Christ. 

When our country took over the responsibility 
for the Philippines, the Church sent Bishop Brent 
to care for our sons who went out to help in the 
government of the Islands. The mothers who 
had not cared much hitherto what religion the 
people had in the islands of the sea were immedi- 
ately grateful that the Church accompanied their 
sons on their long journey. They suspected the 
temptations which beset men in the Far East. 
They rightly trembled for their beloved. They 
saw what it would mean for those whom they 
loved to have the friendship, the counsel and the 
warnings of a righteous and strong friend like 
Bishop Brent. They believed on that day in mis- 
sions. Their immaginations were open. 

Now, all this opening of the imagination is the 
self-imposed task of the women of the Church. 
They are pointing the way with their United 
Thank Offering year by year. They are imagin- 
ing the places where there should be new church- 
es, new schools, where especially, the gracious 
ministry of Christian women should be increased 



14 



The Mission Herald 



beyond the bare necessities. The women of the 
Church are setting the whole Church a high ex- 
ample. 

Last June, President Lowell read to the alumni 
of Harvard College the list of the gifts which he 
said, "had trickled in" durilng the year. He meant 
by that that these were gifts which had come by 
the wholly voluntary desire of the givers. There 
had been no campaign for money. The gifts re- 
presented simply the trust and imagination of 
many people who believed in Harvard University. 
These gifts reached the amazing sum of thirteen 
and a half million dollars. As I listened to the 
grateful voice of the president, I wondered why 
the work of the general Church could not arouse 
a similar trust and imagination. We may rejoice 
that the great universities of the land are entrust- 
ed with enormous gifts, but who will catch the 
priceless value of what the Church of Christ is 
doing with its clergy, its doctors, its nurses, its 
teachers, its Christ-filled lovers of mankind ? The 
Church is as bold as the universities in its search 
for the truth, taking not merely an academic 
risk, ready to give life itself in the quest. The 
Church sends its very best to the distant places, 
that Christ may come to the stranger through 
the transparent medium of men like Bishop Roots 
and Dr. Teusler. The Church sees opportunities 
for beyond our present work. The Church, dream- 
ing dreams, has always led the world in visions 
of the glorious future of mankind. 

May the United Thank Offering stir the imag- 
ination of the daring friends of the Davids of our 
day that they too may bring to Christ the water 
from Bethlehem ; above all may it lift the hearts 
of those who love the Lord Christ to break each 
his alabaster box of precious ointment and pour 
it forth for His glory and for the happiness of 
mankind. 

^ 3JC ^ 

URGENT CALL FOR NURSE 

THE Department of Missions herewith sends 
out an urgent call for an experienced trained 
nurse for the Hudson Stuck Memorial Hospital, 
Fort Yukon, Alaska. One of our regular nurses 
there has broken down, and Dr. Burke, the phy- 
sician in charge, wires that they need a substitute 
desperately. They are in the midst of an epidemic 
and the hospital is full. They are doing their 
best by using available local help, supplemented 
by the assistance of the wife of Dr. Burke. 

We desire to have a communicant of this 
Church, in excellent health, preferably between 
the ages of 25 and 35. and who would go with the 
motive of serving in a difficult place, not for ad- 
venture or change. We need a person who has 



been successful in work done, and who is a loyal, 
Christian woman. 

The salary provides a comfortable living, and 
full travel expenses are paid to the field, and re- 
turning to this country after a term of three 
years. 

For further particulars, address, 

THE REV. A. B. PARSON, 
281 Fourth Avenue, 

New York City. 
* * # 

SOUTHERN TERRITORY BENEFITS FROM 
RED CROSS SERVICE DURING YEAR 

WHILE disaster relief services of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross are seldom confined to any 
one part of the country, records show that a num- 
ber of states in the southeastern territory benefit- 
ed from such aid in time of need during the past 
year. 

From July 1, 1929, to June 30, 1930, there was 
expended through the Red Cross for disaster re- 




THE AMERICAN RED CROSS 



lief in southern states, approximately §269,500. 
This sum is exclusive of amount spent by local 
Red Cross chapters for relief in their respective 
communities. 

Of the total amount of about $269,500, the Red 
Cross contributed fro mits funds $108,986, while 
the remainder represents public contributions 
through the Red Cross directly for relief work in 
the various disasters concerned. 

Assistance was given for local disasters in North 
Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama, and in- 



September, 1930 



15 



eludes continuing expenditures necessitated by 
misfortunes which occurred earlier than the dates 
named. 

As expenditures for disaster relief, under Red 
Cross policy, are made locally when possible, the 
communities affected were doubly benefited. The 
advantage of dealing with business men and busi- 
ness concerns in the territory in which relief is 
going forward, it has been found, is that it speeds 
up restoration of normal economic conditions. 

Besides disaster relief work, the Red Cross 
maintains certain special services through its local 
chapters, through the year. All Red Cross ser- 
vice derives support from the membership en- 
rolled in the organization annually. Enrollment 
this year begins November 11 and continues thru 
November 27. 



GIRL'S FRIENDLY SOCIETY 

THE Girl's Friendly of St. Paul's Church, Pater- 
son, N. J., has had $1,000 bequeathed to it in 
the will of a member of the parish who died re- 
cently. The money was left to the rector in trust 
to be used for the benefit of the G. F. S., at his 
direction. 

* * * 

THE CHURCH SCHOOL INFLUENCE 

OVER 4,000 boys under 21 years of age convict- 
ed of crime in twenty-three years, before 
Judge Fawcett of New York, and among these 
4,000 only three were members of any Sunday 
School. The New York Bible Society quotes Judge 
Fawcett's letter by permission. The Judge says 
also that out of 1,902 cases paroled by him to 
minister, priest or rabbi, only 62 were brought 
back for breaking parole. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Statement of Amounts Paid on Apportionments for the Church's Program- 

and General to September 2nd. 1930 



-Diocesan 



Location Parish Apportionment 

PARISHES 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' $ 100.00 

Ayden, St. James' 320.00 

Aurora, Holy Cross - 500.00 

Bath. St. Thomas' 100.00 

Beaufort,, St. Paul's 600.00 

Belhaven. St. James' 506.00 

Bonnerton. St. John's _ 100.00 

Chocowinity. Trinity 100.00 

Clinton. St. Paul's 400.00 

Creswell. St David's ..... 700.00 

Edenton, St.~Paul's 2,500.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church 2,000.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 400.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's _ 3.300.00 

Fayetteville, St. Joseph's .. 200.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 200.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 1,200.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's 1,500.00 

Grifton, St. John's 250.00 

Hamilton', St. Martin's .... 100.00 

Hertford. Holy Trinity . 1.000.00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church _ 150.00 

Jessama, Zion 125 00 

Kinston, St. Mary's 1,800.00 

Lake Landing. St. George's 125.00 

New Bern. Christ Church ..._ 3.000.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's 400.00 

Plymouth, Grace Church ._ 400.00 

Red Spring's. St. Stephen's 100.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 350.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents.' 240.00 

Southport. St. Philip's £.. 250.00 

Van'ceboro, St. Paul's 50.00 

Washington, St. Peter's 3,500.00 

Williamston. Advent _ . 300.00 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 300.00 

Wilmington, St. James' 13,380.00 

Wilmington St. John's- .. 3,000.00 

Wilmingtoi, St. Mark's 200.00 

Wilmington. St. Paul's — 2,000.00 

Windsor. St Thomas' .. 600.00 

Winton, St. John's - - 200. On 

Woodville. Grace Church 500.00 



Paid by 
Parishes & 
3h. Schools 

$ 14.33 

24.35 

106.00 

34.50 

216.80 

260.44 

58.35 

13.65 

36.07 

161.07 

1,617.30 

1,000.0(1 

16.00 

1,466.45 

51.06 

24.20 

300.00 

875.00 

9.63 

50.00 

175.00 

16.30 

72.56 

225.00 

119.73 

647.25 

319.91 

100.00 

42.00 

186.45 



46.70 

7.50 

1.461.12 

25.07 

353.86 

8,562.051 

1,785.69 

197.75 

628.88 

101.10 



I'.elhaven, St. Mary's 
Burgavv, St. Mary's 



ORGANIZED MISSIONS 

105.00 

100.00 



67.13 



14.00 
42.68 



Due to 
Sept. 1st. 

$ 52.37 
189.00 
227.36 

32.20 
183.20 

72.91 
8.35 

53.05 

' 230.63 

305.63 

49.40 
333.35 
250.70 
733.55 

82.29 
119.15 
500.00 
125.00 
157.07 

16.70 
491.70 

83.70 

10.79 
975.00 

1,352.75 

166.70 
24.70 
46.90 
160.00 
120.00 
25.85 
872.23 
174.93 

357.91 
214.31 

704.47 
298.90 
133.35 
266.22 



5S.00 
24.19 



Columbia, St. Andrew's 

Edenton. St. John-Evangelist 
Elizabeth City, St. Philips'. 

Fairfield, All Saint's ...._ 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Kinston. St. Augustine's 

Lumberton, Trinity 

Maxton, St. Matthew's •. 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's 

North West, AH Souls' 

Oriental, St. Thomas' _. 

Pikeville, Mission 

Roxobel, St. Mark's __. 

Sladesvllle. St. John's 
Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 

Trenton, Grace Church 

Warsaw, Calvary 

Washington, St. Paul's 

Whiteville, Grace Church 

Winterville. St. Luke's 
Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 
Yeatesville, St. Matthew's ... 



309.0U 
150.00 

26.00 

20.00 

50.00 
100.00 

50.00 
100.00 

25.00 

70.00 

50.00 

10.00 

60.00 
125.00 

30.00 
200.00 

76.00 

60.00 
125.00 

40.00 
150.00 

90.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 

MISSIONS 
50.00 



UNORGANIZED 
Aurora, St. Jude's 

Avoca, Holy Innocents' 100.00 

Beaufort, St. Clement'B 40.00 

Creenville, St. Andrew's 50.00 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 65.00 

Jasper, St. Thomas' 50.00 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 50.00 

Pollocksville, Mission 48.00 

Robersonville, Mission 25.00 

Roper. St. Ann's . ' 26.00 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' .. 30.00 

Wilmington. "Brooklyn'', Mission ..... 15.90 

Wrightsville, St. Augustine's . 20.00 

PAROCHIAL MISSIONS 

Campbelton. St. Phillip's 100.00 

Kinston. Christ Church 50.00 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 45.00 



50.00 
105.00 
11.32 
20.00 
25.00 

35.00 
76.37 

52.42 

10.00 



75.52 
30.00 
75.00 



7.00 
85.40 



50.00 

166.00 
51.01 
53.70 



50.00 
11.00 

10.00 



23.53 
16.00 
16.64 



3.11 
19.65 
10.00 
10.00 



42.07 
30.00 
13.00 



150.00 
5.38 



8.36 
66.70 



16.70 
33.35 

33.35 

7.83 

58.35 
50.00 
33.00 



26.70 
50.00 
60.00 



15.69 
13.00 



33.35 
16.70 
15.70 
23.35 
43.3S 
9.82 
17.35 
15.36 
16.70 
13.59 
.35 

3.35 



24.63 
3.35 

17.00 



Total Apportionments- -1930 . ....$ 50,303.00 

Amount Due to September 1st — 8 months $ 33.535.32 

Paid by Parishes. Missions and Church Schools .._. 22.756.63 



Balance flue to September 1st 



% 10,778.6ft 



16 



The Mission Herald 



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Virginia 
Episcopal School 

LYNCHBURG, VA. 



Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
lege and University. Modern 
equipment. Healthy location in 
the mountains of Virginia. Cost 
moderate, made possible through 
generosity of founders. For cat- 
alogue apply to 

Rev. Wm. G. Pendleton, 
D. D., Rector 

Church Furnishings 

Gold. Silver and Brass 

Church and Chancel 
Furniture 

Write for Catalogue for 
Kpiscopal Churches. 

W. & E. Schmidt Co. 

308 Third Street 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin 




fvwvvvvv 



THE 

Bank of Edenton 

SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 

Bank With Us By Mail 

JULIAN WOOD. President. 
W. O. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



CHURCH VESTMENTS 

Cassocks. Surplices. Stoles 

Embroideries, Clerical Suits. 
Silks. Cloths, Frintes 

HATS. RABATS, COLLARS 

Cox Sons & Vining 

131-133 East 23rd Street 
New York 




NORFOLK-SOUTHERN 

Passenger Schedules 
Effective December 29, 1929, via Norfolk 
Southern Railroad, Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Lv. 12:15 P. M.— Raleigh, New Bern. Goldfi- 
bero, Beaufort and inter- 
mediate points. 



Lv. 1« :26 P. M. 



Lv. f, :M) A. M 



Lv. 2:1.1 P. M 



For further 

*if»ply to 



-Raleigh, New Bern, Golde- 
boro, Beaufort, Charlotte. 
Fayetteville and intermed- 
iate points. Sleeper to Ra- 
leigh and New Bern. 

-Norfolk n n d intermediate 
points. 

-Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Connections North 
and West, 
nf ormation . reservations, etc. 

H TUCKER Ticket Am 

FJimhrt-r Oit.v. W II 



X 

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? 

A 
X 

I 

X 

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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 
AND JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter receiv* her 
education in a church school. 

Rev. Warren W. Way, A.M., D.D., Rector 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 years' college 
work all fully accredited by the Southen Association. Also 
Courses in Music, Art, Expression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. Indoor 
Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback Riding. 

For Catalogue and View Book address 
A. W. Tucker, Business Manager 






:;.£. 



us3£39&a&aft£&a^ 



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Church Rimishmqs 



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2 



The Mission Herald 



OCTOBER INDEX Page 

The Bishop's Letter 3 

The Bishop's Appointments _.. 4 

East Carolina Postulants and Candidates 4 

East Carolina News 4 

Work with the Isolated 6 

Is the Church Losing Her Rural Parishes? 7 

Report of Joint Committee, 1930 8 

Report of the Treasurer 9 

Editorials 10 

Synod 10 

Spirit and Methods of Canvass 11 

Are Men Tired of Canvess 11 

Financial Program . 13 

Program for Fall Work 13 

Faith and Youth Program 14 

St. Mary's School Opens 15 

Thompson Orphanage Notes 15 

Thompson Orphanage Resolution 15 

Woman's Auxiliary— 

Educational Program 16 

Suggestions for U. T. O. Programs ~ .16 

Patterson School ... . 16 



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ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. )* 

PJiotaxruiiliK anything, anywhere, anytime, d»y »r niritt. »** 

deari or alive 



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H. WEIL & BROS. 

•:• (ioJclsboro, N. C. 



•5* Specialists in apparel for Men, Women and Children $ 



W. B. THORPE & CO. 

Wilmington, N. C. £ 

Coal and Building: Material 



•CALL ON US" 



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Standing Rock Mission 

In Memoriam — Francis Badhad Warren 
Principles of Giving 
Financial Statement 



18 
18 
19 
19 



LEGACIES 

PEOPLE of small or moderate means do not 
realize how much good may be done with a 
comparatively small legacy. It would be possible 
for very many to leave a sum that would perpetu- 
ate their weekly pledge. For example, at five per 
cent, $1,040 will yield S1.00 every Sunday. We 
are living in times when great financial projects 
are brought to a successful conclusion and so we 
are apt to forget what are often thought to be the 
littlo things. Friends who have had the plan of 
small legacies or gifts shown to them exclaim. "1 
never had any idea that a legacy such as I could 
leave would be of any use!" You may not be able 
to leave a legacy of the size you would like to leave 
for your parish or mission, but the point for you 
to consider is, HAVE you planned for one which 
is within your mteans? — Newark Churchman (con- 
densed). 



| " When in Elizabeth City, N. C. t 

f (ALL ON I 

% First and Citizens National Bank | 

£ They will be glad to serve you I 

f RESOURCES OVER FOUR MILLION DOLLARS I 

* * 

* We take pleasure in selling Book*. Let na quote 'f 

•J* you on your needs or wiehe*. »|> 

P. W. MELICK Co. I 

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•> ELIZABETH CITY. N. C. * 

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e Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, OCTOBER, 1930 



No. 10 




The Bishop's Letter" 

On Sunday, September the 
seventh, I accompanied the Rev. 
Alexander Miller to Whiteville, 
where I baptized an infant and 
preached in Grace Church, at 
8:00 P. M. 

On Thursday, the eleventh, I 
had the privilege of offering the 
opening prayer at the Annual Farmer's Picnic, 
held at the State Test Farm, Willard, N. C. 

On Sunday, the fourteenth, I preached in Trin- 
ity Church, Portsmouth, Va., at 11 :00 A. M. 

Immediately after the service I baptized two of 
my great nephews and one great neice. 

On Sunday, the twenty-first, I had the joyful 
privilege of participating in the official opening 
service in the beautiful new Church and Parish 
House of St. Paul's, Greenville, by addressing the 
Sunday School at 10:30; preaching and celebrat- 
ing Holy Communion at 11 :00 A. M., and preach- 
ing and confirming two persons at 8:00 P. M. 
On the afternoon of the twenty -first, I baptized 
the infant son of the Rev. and Mrs. William A. 
Lillycrop. 

On Monday, the twenty-second, in the Church 
of the Advent, Williamston, I Ordained Mr. Jesse 
Leon Malone to the Diaconate and celebrated Holy 
Communion. The Ordination Sermon was preach- 
ed by the Rev. Francis Joyner, of Littleton, N. C, 
and the Candidate was presented by the Rev. 
Robert B. Drane, D. D. 

The Rev. Mr. Malone has been appointed minis- 
ter in charge of the Gates-Hertford field with 
headquarters at Ahoskie. 

On Tuesday, the twenty-third, 1 celebrated Holy 
Communion in St. Peter's Church, Washington, 
at 10 :30 A. M., and, together with the other clergy 
of the Diocese, participated in the most helpful 
Quiet Day, conducted by the Rev. Shirley C. Hugh- 
son, Superior of the Order of the Holy Cross. 

On the evening of the twenty -third, I made one 
of the addresses at the Program meeting held in 
St. Peter's Church. 

On Thursday, the twenty-fourth, I attended 
and took part in the Rural Conference held at 
Camp Leach. 



The day was helpful and enjoyable and I trust 
that it marked the beginning of many Conferences 
of our Clergy and Laity at our attractive Diocesan 
Camp on the Pamlico. 

On Sunday, the twenty-eighth, I made my first 
official visit t o Elizabethtown. the attractive 
county seat of Bladen. 

Through the courtesy of the Rev. R. H. Poole, 
I preached in the Presbyterian Church, of which 
he is the pastor. After the service I had a con- 
ference with the local members of our Church and 
arranged to give them a service from time to 
time. Bladen is one of the few counties in the 
Diocese in which there is no Episcopal Church, so 
I was especially happy to be able to establish a 
Preaching Station in Elizabethtown. 

On October first and second, I attended a meet- 
ing of the Advisory Committee of the College of 
Preachers in Washington. 

On Sunday, the fifth, I preached in St. Thomas' 
Church, at Kinston, at 11:30 A. M. 

On the night of the fifth, I took part in the 
Dedication of the attractive new building of Christ 
Missiion. "Brooklyn", Wilmington. 

This Mission, which is one of the most hopeful 
in the diocese, is a parochial mission of St. John's 
Church, Wilmington. 

The new Church in Ahoskie is nearing comple- 
tion, and, when finished, Mali be one of the most 
pleasing of the smaller Churches in the diocese. 

We have a small and loyal band of communi- 
cants in Ahoskie and we confidently predict a 
bright and blessed future for this, our newest 
addition to the diocesan family. 

October promises to be a very busy month, so 
I shall probably have a more extended report in 
my November letter. 

The Church in East Carolina has never had a 
finer opportunity for leadership and for construc- 
tive service than it has today. 

I pray God that we may have the grace and 
faith and courage to measure up to that opportu- 
nity. 

Faithfully and affectionately, ? 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 



The Mission Herald 



BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS 
October 19th to December 1st. 

October — 

19. Church of the Advent. Wilmington. 11:00 
A. M. 

Trinity, Bear Grass, afternoon. 
St. Martin's, Hamilton, 8:00 P. M. 

22. St. Paul's, Clinton, 7:30 P. M. 

2?.. St. Mary's Chapel, Greensboro, 8:00 A. M. 
and 6:30 P. M. 
Holy Trinity, Greensboro, 11:00 A. M. 

30. St. Mark's, Roxobel, 8:00 P. M. 

31. Grace, Woodville, 8:00 P. M. 
November — 

2. St. Thomas'. Windsor. 11:00 A. M. and 

8:00 P. M. 

Holy Innocents*. Avoca, afternoon. 
5. Wilmington Convocation. St. Paul's Church 

Beaufort. 
9. Christ Church, New Bern, 11:00 A. M. 

Laymen's Conference. 
1 1-13. Synod of Sewanee, Jackson, Miss. 

16. St. James', Ayden, 11:00 A. M. 
St. John's, Griffon, afternoon. 

St. Luke's. Winterville, 8:00 P. M. 

17. St. Barnabas', Snow Hill, 3:30 P. M. 
Emmanuel, Farmville, 8:00 P. M. 

23. St. George's, Lake Landing, 11:00 A. M. 
All Saints, Fairfield, 3 :30 P. M. 
Calvary. Swan Quarter, 7 :30 P. M. 

24. St. John's, SladesviUe, 7 :30 P. M. 

25. St. James', Belhaven. 7:30 P. M. 

26. St. Matthew's. Yeatesville. 7 :30 P. M. 

27. Grace, Plymouth, 7:30 P. M. 

28. St. Luke's, Roper, 7 :30 P. M. 

30. Christ Church, Creswell. 11 :00 A. M. 

Galilee Mission. Lake Phelps, 3:00 P. M. 
St. Andrew's. Columbia. 7 :30 P. M. 

.*, *i- *t- 

EAST CAROLINA POSTULANTS AND 
CANDIDATES 

THE people of the Diocese may be interested 
in knowing the names and addresses of our 
young men who are preparing for the ministry. 

Oscar E, Holder, Postulant and member of St. 
Augustine's Church. Kinston. Philadelphia Di- 
vinity School, Philadelphia. 

Othello D. Stanley, Postulant and member of 
St. Clement's Mission. Beaufort. Philadelphia Di- 
vinity School. 

Tj-.'—'h T. Turner, Postulant and member of 
Christ Church, Elizabeth City. 

John William Hardy, Postulant and member of 
Holy Innocent's Church, Lenoir County. William 
and Mary College, Williamsburg, Virginia. 

William H. Brown, Postulant and member of 



St. Paul's Church, Greenville. Theological Semfi 
nary, Alexandria, Virginia. 

Frank Bloxham, Candidate and member of St. 
James' Church, Wilmington. Theological Semi- 
nary. Alexandria, Virginia. 

William M. Latta, Candidate and member of St. 
James' Church, Wilmington. Theological Semi- 
nary, Alexandria, Virginia. 

Edward C. McConnell, Candidate and member 
of St. Thomas' Church. Windsor. Lehigh Uni- 
versity, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Rev, William Henry Ross Jackson, Deacon and 
member of St. John's Church, Wilmington, is a 
member of the Senior Class of the Theological 
Department. University of the South. Sewanee, 
Tenn. 

Rev. John Q. Beckwith, Jr., Deacon and member 
of Trinity Church, Lumberton. is a member of the 
Senior Class at the Theological Seminary, Alex- 
andria. Virginia. 

In addition to the above we have two men at 
the University of North Carolina. One at Christ 
School, Arden. and one at the University of Vir- 
ginia who expect to become Postulants in the near 
future. 

* * * 

Ea£t Carolina News 

Clinton, N. C. By the Will of the late Miss Su- 
die Hargrove, for many years a resident of Samp- 
son County and a member of St. Gabriel's Church, 
Faison, the Diocese of East Carolina will receive 
$7,000.00 in bonds and a farm of about 800 acres. 
The farm must be held for one hundred years. 
The Trustees of the Diocese can then sell all but 
one hundred acres on which her father is buried. 
One half of the income of the property "is to be 
used for the good of the Church, as the Bishop 
and Trustees shall decide; the other half to be 
used to send good preachers to scattered Church 
people, not in any particular place, but wherever 
the Bishop, with his Savior to guide him, thinks 
it will help humanity to be better." The Will 
provides that the negroes on the place are to have 
a home their life time, "not a living, but a place 
they can call home and firewood for their personal 
use." Also that "the dogs are to be taken care of 
and not sold nor abused during their life time." 
The Will was made more than 25 years ago and 
has been held during that time by the Trustees 
of the Diocese. The Bishop has qualified as ad- 
ministrator of the Estate. 

* 

Windsor, N. ('. The United Thank Offering 
Treasurer for East Carolina, Mrs. Foy A. Sawyer, 
of this place, has just reported that the spring 



October. 1930 



offering amounted to $1,779.57. She has asked 
the women of the Diocese to make a special effort 
this fall to make the offering as large as possible. 

* 

Greenville, N. C. The new building of St. Paul's 
Parish was formally opened on September 21, 
1930, with a celebration of the Holy Communion 
by the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Bishop 
of East Carolina, assisted by the Rev. W. A. Lilly- 
crop, rector of the parish and the Rev. W. R. Noe, 
Executive Secretary of the Diocese. 

Mr. Lillycrop made a short address in which 
he expressed his appreciation of the league attend- 
ance and paid tribute to the work of those who 
had figured so prominently in making the new 
structure possible. He referred with reverence 
to the late H. A. White, who was Chairman of the 
building committee in charge of preliminary ar- 
rangements and said that it was due largely to his 
ardor and sympathy that the new building was 
made possible. He also referred to the activi- 
ties of Dr. R. L. Carr, who succeeded Mr. White 
and other members of the building committee, who 
labored long and patiently in order that construc- 
tion work might be pushed to completion as rapid- 
ly as possible. 

The sermon was preached by Bishop Darst and 
was generally conceded one of the most forceful 
heard here in years. In his usual straight-for- 
ward way he presented his subject; "What is 
the Church and Why ?" and when he had finished, 
his hearers had gained a fuller understanding of 
the Mission of the Church. 

The building is a credit to the progressive spirit 
of Greenville. There is a chapel large enough for 
the regular church services for many years or 
until a separate church building can be provided; 
large class rooms for the church school; banquet 
room; large assembly rooms for the church or- 
ganizations and a "Student Center" for the girls 
of East Carolina College. 

For the third time in its history, this parish has 
a new building. The Parish was organized in 
1835. For nearly one hundred years the con- 
gregation has worshipped on Pitt and Second 
Streets. There they outgrew their first building 
and built there in 1885 the present structure 
which stands now as an old land mark of the town. 
With the study growth of the congregation, it 
was foreseen that the second building was being 
outgrown. And during the past fifteen years 
the congregation has been planning to achieve the 
building of their present edifice. In moving the 
site of their building to a place near East Caro- 
lina College, it becomes the first congregation in 
Greenville to move into this new and growing 
residential section. 



The "Student Center" was made possible by the 
Diocese of East Carolina. There is an office for 
the secretary ; club room, kitchen and supply 
rooms. It will be of real service to the student 
worker, Mrs. Jennie Morris Howard, and the large 
number of girls at the College. As Bishop Darst 
has said: "Greenville is looking up as one of the 
great spiritual centers of the Diocese of East 
Carolina and parents everywhere realize the im- 
portant part St. Paul's Parish is playing in the 
education of the young men and women, who 
come here from year to year to seek, spiritual 
leadership from the Church." 

It is a source of happiness to the members of the 

other congregations in Greenville that St. Paul's 

has achieved this lovely new building. And in 

the splendid spirit of Christian fellowship that 

exists here, many members of other religious 

bodies attended the opening service. 

* 

Washington, N. C. A quiet day for the clergy 
of East Carolina was conducted in St. Peter's 
Church on September 23, 1930, by the Rev. Shirley 

C. Hughson, of the Order of the Holy Cross. 

This was followed by a conference on the "Pro- 
gram of the Woman's Auxiliary", which was pre- 
sented by Mrs. H. J. MacMillan, Diocesan Presi- 
dent. 

At night, a conference on "The Church's Pro- 
gram" was held. The "Program for Fall Work" 
was outlined by the Rev. Alexander Miller, Chair- 
man of the Field Department. Addresses were 
made by Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., on "The Need 
for Power" ; Rev. W. R. Noe, on "The Every Mem- 
ber Canvass", and Bishop Darst. The program 
was approved by the clergy. It calls for a Quiet 
Day for each parish and mission of the Diocese 
as a part of the spiritual preparation of the people ; 
meetings of men, women and young people for a 
careful study of the work, and a thorough Every 
Member Canvass. 

The next day conferences on "Rural Work", 
Chairman of the Department of Christian Social 
Service and "Religious Education" under the lead- 
ership of Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, Chairman of the 
Department, were held at Camp Leach near here. 
Representatives of all the parishes and missions 
were invited to the conferences and a large num- 
ber were present. The special speakers were Rev. 
A. C. D. Noe, Rev. I. deL. Brayshaw, Mrs. W. S. 
Carrowan, Miss Cornelia Harris and Bishop Darst. 

* 

Williamston, N. C. Mr. Jesse Leon Malone was 
ordained Deacon by the Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst. 

D. D., Bishop of East Carolina, in the Church of 
the Advent, Williamston, N. C, on Monday, Sep- 
tember 22. 1930. The candidate was presented 



6 



The Mission Herald 



by the Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D., rector of St. Paul's. 
Edenton. The sermon was by a relative, the Rev. 
Francis Joyner. of Littleton, Diocese of North 
Carolina. The Litany was read by the Rev. 
Stephen Gardner, St. Peter's, Washington, and 
the Epistle by the Rev. A. J. Mackie, St. Thomas', 
Windsor. Other clergy present: Rev. A. C. D. 
Noe, St. James'. Ayden ; Rev. A. H. Marshall, Ad- 
vent. Williamston; Rev. W. R. Noe, Executive 
Secretary of the Diocese of East Carolina and 
Rev. Bertram E. Brown, Calvary. Tarboro; Rev. 
Theodore Partrick, Trinity, Scotland Neck; Rev. 
D. P. Moore, Grace, Weldon, of the Diocese of 
North Carolina. 

The new Deacon has been placed in charge of 
St. Mary's. Gatesville; St. John's, Winton; St. 
Peter's, Sunbury ; St. Barnabas'. Murf reesboro and 
St. Thomas'. Ahoskie. 

A luncheon was served to the clergy and other 
visitors by the Business Woman's Auxiliary of the 
Church of the Advent. 

;|: * * 

Work With £he Isolated 

/~T\ ID you ever think of St. Paul as a very suc- 
JLv cessful rural clergyman? He had all the 
problems of too large a territory to cover as regu- 
larly as he would have liked, people who could not 
read or write and needed instruction, bad roads, 
not enough money, unjust criticism because of 
prejudice, discouragement from loneliness, and 
the longing for congenial, understanding compan- 
ionship. 

How did he met his problems to get such good 
and lasting results? 

1. He divided his territory systematically, vis- 
ited those he could, and sent written instructions 
and pastoral messages to the others in between 
visits to keep up their interest in the Church. 

2. For those who could not read or write, he 
tried to find one person in the district who could, 
a man or a woman, and asked them to invite the 
others to their homes and act as his interpreter 
between visits when he wrote them letters. 

3. He trained and used volunteers wherever 
he could and used homes for places of meeting. 

4. He faced prejudices and discouragements 
with patience and the knowledge that they gave 
him the opportunity to offer a richer gift to Christ 
than those who lived in easier positions, and that 
with Christ as his Companion he could do all 
thint! ' 

'•■'-'■'en • 

His methods are good today and we are using 
them in the work of the isolated. But in the 
modern, smaller diocese there are a few things 
that have been found essential as regards admin- 
istration to avoid friction or duplication of effort. 



1 . A map of the diocese showing every mission 
boundary line and no "no man's land" is needed 
if the isolated are to know to whom to turn for 
pastoral care, and through which mission or parish 
to offer their gifts of money and service when 
their love for God grows to need that Christian 
experience. It is necessary also for making fu- 
ture surveys and to avoid neglect of families be- 
tween missions, or to prevent waste by duplication 
of effort. 

2. Each diocese (until the time comes when 
every parish and mission is sure of having a rec- 
tor and people with vision to carry on their own 
work in their own territory) should have at least 
one person appointed by the Bishop who will help 
the clergy with the work with isolated families, 
leaving the clergy free from the routine details 
to carry on the pastoral work only the clergy 
can do. 

A woman is suggested because they have no 
priestly duties and usually can take more time 
to minister through letters in the friendly way 
that is necessary. 

To this person could be reported invalids and 
isolated families (those who are unable to have 
services at least once a month) ; families in mis- 
sions where the interest needs keeping alive dur- 
ing a temporary interim without a clergyman; 
children who need Church School instruction by 
mail, or adults who need home instruction for 
Baptism. Confirmation, or Church knowledge, be- 
cause they are unable to attend group instruction; 
and the Church people in any institutions which 
are without an Episcopalian chaplain. 

3. It should be decided under what diocesan 
department or departments this leader for the iso- 
lated should work, and how the funds are to be 
provided for postage and supplies. It is not an 
expensive work, but some leaders have been ap- 
pointed as volunteer workers and had to provide 
their own funds. This is unfair and hinders the 
until the next budget, sometimes the Woman's 
work. 

Where diocesan funds have been unavailable 
Auxiliary have helped to provide funds by pledg- 
ing a small amount from each group. In some 
dioceses the Department of Religious Education 
takes the suport of the Church School and adult 
instruction, and the Department of Missions pays 
for the expense of letters, Church at Work, mail- 
ing, etc. It has been estimated that, with the 
Jacobs' Episcopal Church Series of graded lessons, 
a pupil costs about fifty cents a year in a corre- 
spondence Church School. 

To relieve the dioceses of too much expense at 
the beginning of the work, the national office will 
provide free mimeographed form letters, enroll- 



October. 1930 



merits blanks, baptismal and confirmation lessons, 
adult home study courses under selected instruc- 
tors, and a free library for adults and children 
with lists of books for every isolated family. 
Conies of this material will be found in the mimeo- 
graphed sets of suggestions which will be distri- 
buted. 

We will also help with the instruction of isolated 
children until the right local instructor is found 
for -the diocese. This work will grow more rapid- 
ly, however, if it is done locally with the addition- 
al publicity which a local leader could give it. We 
are ready to help your leaders in every way we 
can with training and as a clearing house for sug- 
gestions for their problems. 

ft has been found that the dioceses which stress 
the children's work have reached more adults and 
developed their work most rapidly. Parents are 
interested in what we are doing for their children. 
They tell other parents and often take home study 
courses on "Religion in the Home" and "Teacher 
Training". This year there will be monthly par- 
ents letters which will help in their training and 
which can be secured by the leaders, also monthly 
letters for children taking them on an imaginary 
Church Pilgrimage. Last year a set was develop- 
ed which taught the Christian Year. These are 
to be used in addition to the lessons. 

Sometimes a clergyman wishes to instruct his 
own isolated children. It is his privilege and 
there should be no misunderstanding about his 
authority in his own mission. The leader is simply 
a volunteer helper whom he can use if he wishes. 
If not using her means neglect for children in his 
care it is his responsibility. If he has time to do 
the work himself, it would be an ideal plan and 
the diocesan leader could provide him with what- 
ever extra material he cares to use. The present 
shortage of rural clergy and trained local leaders 
makes the diocesan plan temporarily valuable in 
keeping members interested and drawing others 
into the Church who otherwise would have little 
or no contact with Church life. 

It is the responsibility of the rural clergy to 
help their people who have Church privileges to 
see the vision of reaching out to the isolated mem- 
bers to include them in every way in their Church 
groups and life, making friendly contacts wher- 
ever they can through letters, special services, 
service projects, calls, etc. The ideal situation 
will be reached when every parish and mission 
rakes its own responsibility and, as Bishop John- 
son, of Colorado expresses it, a parish ceases to be 
a point and becomes an area. 

We realize that some of the material is unsuit- 
able to some backgrounds. This problem will have 
to be solved gradually as the work grows. It 



seemed better for the national department to give 
the leaders something that would be of most use 
to the majority first. We have given the first 
year to organization and general material, and 
traveling has made it impossible to develop the 
material for specific local problems. This year 
we hope to begin giving time to those, and we will 
be glad to have suggestions and constructive criti- 
cisms for those in the field who are meeting the 
problems. 

EDNA EASTWOOD. 

Secretary for Home Study. 
* * * 

Is Tlie Church Losing Her 
Rural Parishes? 

SCATTERED about over the Diocese of East 
Carolina are many strictly rural parishes and 
missions, which contain no towns of any great 
size. The occupation of the people is almost en- 
tirely farming and its allied pursuits. These peo- 
ple are mostly of good English stock, being de- 
cendents, wholly or in part, of the early English 
settlers, many of whom brought their Bibles and 
Prayer Books with them to their new homes. 
They brought also the faith and ti-aditions of the 
Church of the mother country, which they fondly 
cherished and passed on to their children. What 
a heritage! When the break with the mother 
country came and all the English clergy turned 
their backs on the American people and went back 
home, and when years later the American Church 
was organized, they gladly embraced it because it 
brought to them their old and much loved form 
of worship. Is all this wealth of devotion and 
tradition to go into the discard, and these rural 
people who belong to the Church by right of her- 
itage to be absorbed by the various denomin- 
ations ? 

If we are to use the spirit and interest mani- 
fested by those who attended, as a guage to 
measure the value of the conference at Camp 
Leach on rural work, it was a great success. But 
if we take the lack of interest displayed by the 
rural personal of the Church, the very people 
whom it was intended to reach and help, it was 
a — well, not so successful. 

I wish to state here and and now that 1 am not a 
pessimist. If not, therefore I must be that other 
thing, though he be "a fool not in possession of 
all the facts." But in spite of all that is suggested 
or implied by the above quip, I still assert that I 
am not pessimistic. But if I seem to sound a 
dreary note it is only I see the fields fully ripe 
for the harvest while the laborers are pitifully 
few. It is because I have an unquenchable desire 
to see mv Father's business attended with as much 



8 



The Mission Herald 



His children as they employ in their own personal 
affairs. 

f dare say that everyone who attempts to dis- 
cuss or consider any phase or condition of the 
Church in a general way has some particular 
church or parish in mind. I will admit I have. 
But I am convinced by personal observation as 
well as by statements dropped here and there by 
various Churchmen that the parish I have in 
mind, with a few rare exceptions, is a fair sample 
of all rural parishes in this diocese at least. 

The spirit of true religion seems to be gradu- 
ally dying, in many cases it is dead, and perhaps 
already buried. It appears that a deadly spiritu- 
al apathy has settled down upon the people. They 
seem to have been caught between the upper and 
nether mill-stone, as it were. That is between a 
paralyzing indifference for all things pertaining 
to the Church and a vigorous campaign which is 
being continually waged by enemies of the Church 
with the avowed purpose, as they term it, of tear- 
ing down and destroying its false doctrines. 

I know that this is not a pretty picture that I 
am painting. But we, who are of the Church, 
had as well face the situation one time as an- 
other, and the sooner the better if we wish to 
save our rural parishes to the Church and what 
we firmly believe to be the true cause of our 
Master. 

The Church has remained passive while others 
have been aggressive. I trust I am not too bold 
in saying that when she has been smitten on one 
cheek she has turned the other in many cases and 
been smitten there also. I know that this pro- 
cedure seems to be in keeping with our Lord's 
instructions. I also know that conditions as they 
now exist in most of our rural parishes are a 
direct challenge to every loyal Churchman to be 
up and doing. Nothing short of putting on the 
"Whole armor of God", and standing fast on our 
own ground fully armed with the "Sword of the 
spirit" will avail us any thing in this crisis. We 
have, I believe, ignored the condition long enough 
if we wish to hold our own. 

Some may, perhaps, say, "This is probably all 
true, but what can I do about it?" Do! Why 
just be true. Be true to God your creator and 
Christ your redeemer; true to your Church and 
your Christian vows ; true to your neighbor and 
your fellow man everywhere ; true to yourself and 
your own spiritual interests. Sounds simple, 
doesn'L it? Yet if every communicant of the 
Church would make "Be true" their slogan, and 
live up to it in every intricate ramnification of 
its meaning, the Church's problems would be solv- 
ed. Our Churches would be filled for every ser- 
vice ; our Church Schools would be attended, not 



zeal and interest by those who profess to be 
only by a few children who wish to come, but by 
unmarried adults, and parents who would come 
and bring their children ; the Church's finance 
would no longer be a problem, for if we were true 
to our God it would be a pleasure as well as a 
privilege to lay our offerings on His altar for the 
furtherance of His Kingdom. 

— Only A. Layman of East Carolina 

FROM THE REPORT OF THE JOINT COMMIT- 
TEE TO THE CONVENTION OF 1930 

(This Report was adopted unanimously) 

For the Future 

1. That the Parishes and Missions of the Dio- 
cese accept as their goal an apportionment equal 
to 100 per cent of their reported Current Ex- 
penses. 

2. That a normal basis determined by the re- 
ported current expenses and the apportionment. 

3. That all Parishes and Missions whose ap- 
portionments are above the normal basis increase 
their apportionments a like percentage as the re- 
ported increase in current expenses over the pre- 
vious .year indicates. 

4. That all Parishes and Missions whose ap- 
portionments are below the normal basis but more 
than 50 r '< of their reported current expenses in- 
crease their apportionment each year 5% until 
the normal basis is reached. 

5. That all Parishes and Missions whose ap- 
portionments are below the normal basis but less 
than 50 % of their reported current expenses in- 
crease their apportionments each year 10% until 
the normal basis is reached. 

(Note by Executive Secretary) 

The following list of apportionments for 1930 
and percentage of current expenses will enable 
any parish or mission to work out its apportion- 
ment for 1931. 

8 

a o a 

v x 



Location and Parish 



" f-i 
o 
ft 
ft 
< 



* Atkinson, St. Thomas' ... ._$ 100.00 

!Ayden, St. James' 320.00 

Aurora, Holy Cross 500.00 

Bath, St. Thomas' 100.00 

Beaufort, St. Paul's 600.00 

Belhaven, St. James' __ 500.00 

Bonnerton, St. John's 100.00 

Chocowinity, Trinity . 100.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's __ 400.00 

Creswell, St. David's .. 700.00 

Edenton, St. Paul's 2,500.00 









82 
50 
91 
52 

100 
46 
65 
65 

100 
74 



October, 1930 



9 



Elizabeth City, Christ Church 2,000.00 

Farmville, Emmanuel 400.00 

Fayetteville, St. John's 3,300.00 

x IFayetteville, St. Joseph's ... 200.00 

Gatesville, St. Mary's ._ 200.00 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 1,200.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's __ 1,500.00 

IGrifton, St. John's _ 250.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's .. 100.00 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1,000.00 

Hope Mills, Christ Church 150.00 

Jessama, Zion 125.00 

Kinston. St. Mary's __ 1,800.00 

!Lake Landing, St. George's 125.00 

New Bern, Christ Church 3,000.00 

New Bern, St. Cyprian's _____ 400.00 

I Plymouth, Grace Church . 400.00 

Red Springs, St. Stephen's 100.00 

Roper, St. Luke's 350.00 

.Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 240.00 

Southport, St. Philip's 250.00 

Vanceboro, St. Paul's _ 50.00 

Washington, St. Peter's ._ 3,500.00 

Williamston, Advent 300.00 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd ._... 300.00 

Wilmington, St. James' 13,380.00 

Wilmington, St. John's 3,000.00 

x [Wilmington, St. Mark's . 200.00 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 2,000.00 

Windsor, St. Thomas' 600.00 

IWinton, St. John's _ 200.00 

Woodville, Grace Church 500.00 

ORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Ahoskie, Mission 

Belhaven, St. Mary's 105.00 

Burgaw, St. Mary's ._ 100.00 

Columbia, St. Andrew's _ 300.00 

Edenton, St. John-Evangelist... 150.00 

Elizabeth City, St. Philip's 25.00 

Fairfield, All Saints' 20.00 

Faison, St. Gabriel's 50.00 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 100.00 

Kinston, St. Augustine's .. 50.00 

Lumberton, Trinity 100.00 

IMaxton, St. Matthew's ___ 25.00 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's 70.00 

North West, All Souls 50.00 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 10.00 

Pikeville, St. George's ...... .50 

Roxobel, St. Mark's 125.00 

*Sladesville, St. John's .. 30.00 

Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 200.00 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 75.00 

Swan Quarter, Calvary 60.00 

Trenton, Grace Church .... 125.00 

Warsaw, Calvary .. 40.00 

Washington, St. Paul's 150.00 



45 
62 
68 
9 
41 
48 
54 
55 
27 
64 
86 
71 
62 
27 
50 
39 
77 
48 

100 
81 
91 
29 
68 
26 
13 
62 
62 
9 
44 
71 
62 

100 



91 
100 
100 
55 
39 
20 
31 
55 
32 
27 
23 
21 

100 

15 
59 

50 
87 
50 
90 
23 
100 



IWhiteville, Grace Church 90.00 54 

IWinterville, St. Luke's 200.00 100 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 100.00 46 

lYeatesville, St. Matthew's 100.00 47 

UNORGANIZED MISSIONS 

Aurora, St. Jude's 50.00 100 

Avoca, Holy Innocent's 100.00 100 

Beaufort, St. Clement's 40.00 100 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 50.00 50 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 65.00 100 

*Jasper, St. Thomas' 50.00 — 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 50.00 40 

Pollocksville Mission 48.00 100 

*Robersonville, Mission 25.00 — 

Roper, St. Ann's 25.00 100 

Williamston, St. Ignatius' 30.00 29 

*Wilmington, "Brooklyn" Miss'n 15.00 — 

*Wrightsville, St. Augustine's 20.00 — 

PAROCHIAL MISSIONS 

Campbellton, St. Philip's 100.00 100 

♦Kinston, Christ Church 50.00 — 

Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 45.00 13 

Total $ 50,303.00 

* No current expenses reported. 

! Current expenses from 1928 report. 

x These parishes became self-sustaining a few 
years ago and were given small apportion- 
ments. 

H< % % 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER 
Thank You! 
Paid by Parishes and Missions on 
Apportionments — 

to September 1, 1929 $21,760.08 

to September 1, 1930 22,756.63 

to October 1, 1929 23,634.83 

to October 1, 1930 24,549.66 

Please Note: 

1. The payment of about $1,000.00 more to 
September 1st of this year and particularly the 
same amount to October 1st. This shows inter- 
est, loyalty and sacrifice on the part of a large 
number of our people in this year of depression. 

2. Our Budget requirements are about the 
same as last year, but our expectations are less 
on account of the reduction of the apportionments 
of a number of parishes by the Convention of 
1930. See pages 39 and 40, Journal 1930, for 
Budget and Expectations. Our books show that 
we are operating well within our Budget in spite 
of the fact that most of the vacant fields have 
been filled, which will reduce the amount of our 
expectation from lapsed balances. 

3. See statements of amounts paid on appor- 
tionments in October issue of the Mission Herald. 

Continued on first column, page eleven 



10 



The Mission Herald 



c Ilit&srtan ©era 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY. NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription .$1.00 a Year. Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent pei word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Elizabeth City. N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. 

* * * 

THE FALL PROGRAM 

THE parishes and missions of the diocese, 
through their representatives, at the confer- 
ence recently held at Washington, unanimously 
adopted the program for fall work as found in 
this issue of the Mission Herald. 

It is hoped that these plans will be carried out 
to their fullest in every parish and in every mis- 
sion. An united effort throughout the diocese in 
one program vvill count for far more in the ad- 
vancement of the Church in God's service than 
by each parish or mission carrying out some in- 
dividual plan of their own invention no matter 
how original. 

* 

EVERY MEMBER CANVASS 

THE Every Member Canvass is discussed at 
length in this issue, giving all sides of the sub- 
ject. Whatever the reader's ideas may be re- 
garding this subject he will be benefitted by a 
careful reading of this matter. 

No method has been devised as yet that can 
take the place of the Every Member Canvass. 
Details, however, in the conduct of the canvass 
may be changed, perhaps with profit, and all such 
.suggestions are freely discussed in this issue. 

X ST. PAUL'S, GREENVILLE 

WE congratulate the good people of St. Paul's. 
Greenville, on the completion of their new 
building. We will all be happy to meet with them 
and rejoice with them in person at the coming- 
meeting of the Diocesan Convention. 



WORK WITH THE ISOLATED 

THE article with the above heading in this issue 
was prepared by Miss Edna Eastwood of the 
National Department of Religious Education, 281 
Fourth Ave.. New York, to be read at the Rural 
Conference at Camp Leach. The paper came too 
late, however, for this, and so it is given to the 
diocese in this form because it is a real contribu- 
tion to the subject. It is hoped that all members 
of the diocese doing any rural work will read same 
carefully and will find real profit thereby. 

LAMBETH 

£T> EGINNING next month the Mission Herald 
13 will begin, in serial form, the Resolutions of 
the recent Lambeth Conference. These resolu- 
tions are of real value to the thinking Christians 
of this century. 

SgS sfc 5j» 




* * * 

SYNOD 

THE Synod of the Fourth Province (The Pro- 
vince of Sewanee) will meet in St. Paul's 
Church, Meridian. Miss., November 11th, to 13th„ 

The opening service will be held on the evening 
of the 11th, at which time the address will be 
delivered by the Rt. Rev. Hugh L. Burleson. D. D. y 
Assessor to the Presiding Bishop. 

The business sessions will open on the morning 
of the 12th and the various departments will have 
an opportunity to make their reports during the 
days following. 

Joint sessions between the Provincial Auxiliary 
and the Synod ha-\ e been arranged for. 

On the second evening Bishop Gailor will ad- 
dress the Synod on the Lambeth Conference. 

On the third evening there will be a mass meet- 
ing on work among college students. 



October. 1930 



11 



REPORT OF TREASURER 

Continued from page nine 
It will show that some places are waiting to pay 
at the end of the year and that others are con- 
siderably behind. If they will begin now to "catch 
up" it will mean much to all of us. We owe the 
money now due to the Bank and General Church. 
4. We are grateful for the fine response of our 
people this year. We believe that they find great 
joy in doing this work for Christ and His Church. 
W. R. NOE. 

Treasurer. 

* * * 

The Spirit and Method of The 
Every Member Canvass 

WE are still striving to make "every member 
a worshipper, giver, and doer" ; but we pur- 
pose to decrease and not increase machinery, to 
provide for and not submerge the spirit, to utilize 
and not eliminate the personal approach, to employ 
Personal Evangelism and the Every Member Can- 
vass in the interest of a healthier, more spiritual 
Church. We plan to reduce money talk in the 
Church and Church circles, by concentrated affort 
during a small period of time so that the money 
problem may then be solved and need little or no 
attention for the rest of the year. Lent and Ad- 
vent are the penitiential seasons, the time just 
preceding or even including Advent may well be 
the financial season. In all instances it is true, 
however, that if a sizable amount of money is to 
be raised, an organized effort is necessary. We 
have no choice in raising the Church budget, we 
must have an organized effort. Our responsibil- 
ity is to see that this effort is Churchly. 

A method will not work itself; there is no way 
of having a system underwrite the Parish budget. 
while those that should be workers sit back and 
watch a technique operate of and by itself. Money 
raised by securing pledges requires work. But it 
should be happy labor. There is something radi- 
cally wrong with a canvass that does not give fun 
and happiness, inspiration and education to the 
workers. 

The canvass should be a Parochial enterprise 
and it would be best if we could get every member 
warking as well as giving in this enterprise. Every 
thing possible should be done to secure the cen- 
tering of the interest and active help of the Church 
School and all Parish organizations for the can- 
vass period. 

Contributions to capital outlay, such as new 
buildings, are occasional and should be made from 
individual's surplus of wealth; but gifts to cur- 
rent operations, the maintenance budget, should 



come from the current income of the contributor 
No organization can or should deserve the good 
will of the community so much as the the Parish 
Church and good will is the asset that finances the 
Church. 

% ^ $? 

Are Men Tired of The Canvass? 

IS THERE ANY EFFECTIVE SUBSTI- 
TUTE FOR IT? 

A Symposium on the Every Member Canvass 

IN many of the Dioceses and Missionary Dis- 
tricts practically the whole fall is devoted to 
the Every Member Canvass. Our leaders evi- 
dently consider it very important for they have 
us to give as much, if not more, time to it than 
we have for the observance of Lent or any other 
season of the Christian year. From September, 
when we begin our conferences, until the time of 
the Canvass we are thinking of and planning for 
this great work. If we have a Mission, or Quiet 
Day, or Conference, or if we prepare special ser- 
mons, we have in mind the Every Member Can- 
vass. But, in spite of all this work, for several 
years now there has been a "shrinkage" in our 
income. The General Church has had to break 
hearts to balance budgets; the Dioceses have had 
to do less work; our Province has dropped from 
first to fifth place ; many of our parishes and mis- 
sions are financially embarrassed. The time has 
evidently come to ask questions. Why is our in- 
come less? Are we using the best methods for 
reaching our people? Is the Every Member Can- 
vass all right ? And if we find that it is to ask — 
Is it failing because men are tired of it and want 
a substitute ? Realizing that this question should 
be answered by the men who are doing the work, 
I thought a Symposium might be helpful. A letter 
was therefore sent to four lawyers, two bank- 
ers; two railroad afficials: two physicians; one 
farmer; one secretary; one insurance agent and 
one manufacturer, with the request that they 
speak fully and frankly and with the promise that 
their names would not be used in this paper. Their 
answers are interesting and helpful. With one ex- 
ception they say that they are not tired of the 
Every Member Canvass and that there is no sub- 
stitute for it. A few of these answers should be 
helpful to us in our work: 

One says : "The only men who possibly 
become tired of the Annual Every Mem- 
ber Canvass, are, in my opinion, those who 
have never entered whole heartedly into it. 
After wrestling with its problems for several 
years, I am convinced that it is the only way 
to approach the vitally important task of en- 



12 



The Mission Herald 



listing the spiritual and material resources of 
ALL of our members." 

Another writes : "Men sometimes get tir- 
ed of performing any duty. Church going 
often seems irksome and cases are not un- 
known where men even tire of the restraints 
of home life with its routine of duties and 
obligations and long to get away from it all 
and have their freedom once again. But there 
is no such thing as freedom. All of us are 
subject to some thing or some person. Free- 
dom means inertness, that is, he who is abso- 
lutely free does nothing, amounts to nothing 
and is nobody. In this sense some men may 
be tired of the Every Member Canvass. 

"But if the question means are laymen tir- 
ed of the Every Member Canvass as a means 
of carrying on the work of the Church, not 
only financially but spiritually, my answer 
is decidedly No. Why should men be tired 
of something that has been successful, and 
this runs into your second question, "Is there 
any substitute for it?" 

"There is not. I have seen sporadic cases 
of other plans being tried out every one of 
which has proven to be a failure." 

"The simplest explanation of this is to com- 
pare the Church to a business institution. 
Would any manufacturer or wholesaler stock 
his shelves with goods and depend on a nice- 
ly worded letter or a little talk to a selected 
group or to casual meetings with prospective 
customers to sell them. He would not. He 
would select the best men he could find, in- 
struct them as to every advantage of the 
goods handled, then give them a list of pros- 
pective customers. Every man on that list 
would be seen, the merits of the goods extoll- 
ed and a sale made if possible." 

"No other system would be used in busi- 
ness. No other system will produce satis- 
factory results in the Church." 

"But it is well to remember that Every 
Member Canvass is a misnomer until and 
unless every member has been seen." 

Another says: "The Every Member Can- 
vass is about the only thing that I know of 
that produces satisfactory results even where 
it is not completely carried out, it being one 
of the few systems that produces results from 
the start. To my mind any kind of a canvass 
is better than no canvass and the Every Mem- 
ber Canvass carried out as it should be is the 
greatest single movement in the church since 
the rewriting of the Fly Leaf of the Prayer 
Book during the period of the Revolution. 



"The direct result of the Every Member 
Canvass was the demand, by the laity, for a 
great revival of religion within the church 
resulting in the Bishop's Crusade. The Every 
Member Canvass is not a canvass primarily 
for money, but an effort to place responsibil- 
ity of the church among the laymen, where 
the responsibility naturally lies. No man can 
ask another man to contribute funds to the 
church without first asking himself why the 
funds should be produced, and in that ques- 
tion the Every Member Canvass accomplishes 
its results." 

"Where you can get a number of men in the 
parish to agree to go out two by two with the 
specific purpose of enlisting the aid and sym- 
pathy of their neighbors in the spread of 
Christ's Kingdom, you have accomplished a 
revival of religion which no orator can dupli- 
cate, no matter how brilliant that orator may 
be." 

"The Every Member Canvass impresses the 
solicitor with the importance of the work and 
of his importance to the work thereby pro- 
ducing a better member of the church and 
citizen of the community. The system in its 
entirety must first be thoroughly sold to the 
clergy ; and then the clergyman must fill each 
interested member with the belief in the plan 
and from there to other members until every 
man and woman, not only in that particular 
church, but in the entire community served 
by that church, if filled with the importance 
of their participation in this greatest of all 
movements on earth, the bringing of souls to 
the Master." 

If, as these laymen say, the Every Member 
Canvass is a good method, and they are willing to 
use it, what is our real trouble? This question is 
also answered by the laymen: 

One said : "There are doubtless many rea- 
sons for failure of the Canvass to attain 
maxmum results, some of which are: 

"Lack of adequate preparation by the Rec- 
tor and selected Canvassers. Many go about 
the work without knowing their subject." 

"Insincerity of purpose. Some men and 
women undertake the work without being 
thoroughly 'sold" on it themselves." 

"Too many canvassers. It is difficult to 
'teach' a large number to effectively approach 
the membership with facts and figures, in a 
way to get the best results. It seems more 
likely to succeed where the workers are few 
but all mightily in earnest and thoroughly 



October, 1930 



13 



informed. Only those able to talk to people, 
those having what is termed 'a good ap- 
proach', should be selected. (This is, of 
course, the ideal, and must, perforce, be 
gauged by the talent avaiable.) 

"Failure to 'follow up' and 'check up'. This 
is usually due to (1) Lack of system, or (2) 
Negligence on part of workers in carrying 
out instructions which must contemplate a 
thorough and painstaking offort to secure an 
expression from EVERY MEMBER." 

Another: "In this connection I cannot re- 
frain from expressing my personal disap- 
pointment with reference to the Canvass. At 
the time of its institution every thing which 
was said and done indicated an intention to 
place the main amphasis upon a general 'tak- 
ing stock' of the condition of the parish with 
only straight emphasis upon contributions. 
We have lost this attitude entirely and the 
Canvass has degenerated into a mere effort to 
raise money. What a pity that we could not 
keep up the spirit of self-examination once a 
year, not only the examination of our finan- 
cial condition but examination of our general 
condition as parishes." 

This may be our problem in many parishes 
and missions. They have evidently lost sight of 
the fact that the Every Member Canvass is a real 
spiritual effort — that the aim of the Church's 
Program is to make worshippers, workers and 
givers and to have them as a great spiritual force 
in the Church. We have stressed this fact in the 
Programs of our Diocese for several years. Our 
Program for this year is a call to our people to 
offer themselves to the service of Christ and His 
Church. A number of things make us feel that 
our work is bearing fruit and that our people are 
beginning to understand the real meaning of 
stewardship : 

1. This year, in spite of the depression, 
they have paid on their apportionments to 
September 1st, one thousand dollars more 
than to that date last year. 

2. One of our members, who was a sup- 
porter of a small mission and a contributor 
to other work of the Church, passed away a 
few months ago. By her will the Diocese 
will receive all her real and personal property. 
One half of the income, according to the will, 
must be used by the Bishop "to send good 
preachers to the scattered people, not in any 
particular place, but wherever the Bishop, 
with his Savior to guide him, thinks it will 
help humanity to be better." 

3. There are now about twelve students 



of this Diocese preparing for the ministry and 
a number of others, both rrien and women, 
have offered themselves for life service. 

(This paper was read by Rev. Walter R. Noe, at a 
conference of a group of Clergy of the Province of Se- 
wanee, held in the Atlanta-Biltmore Hotel, Atlanta, Ga., 
September 26, 1930.) 

* # # 

FINANCIAL PROGRAM— 1931 

General Church Quota $ 13,000.00 

Salary of Bishop 6,000.00 

Pension Premium for Bishop 200.00 

Salaries of Missionary Clergy . 28,000.00 
Pension Assessments — Missionary 

Clergy 1,700.00 

Office Expense— Bishop 275.00 

Travel Expense — Bishop 450.00 

Maintenance Bishop's House 400.00 

Printing and Postage 275.00 

Salary of Treasurer 500.00 

Salary of Secretary of Annual 

Convention 250.00 

Expenses of Annual Convention 375.00 

Printing Journal 450.00 

Expenses — Committees 350.00 

Maintenance Diocesan Office 450.00 

Travel Expenses — Ex. Secretary 300.00 

Insurance 500.00 

Provincial Synod Essessment 433.00 

General Convention Assessment __ 200.00 

Salary of Ex. Secretary 3,000.00 

Salary of Office Secretary 1,500.00 

Auditing Books and Bond 50.00 

Mission Herald 600.00 



Total ...$ 59,258.00 

Advance Work— 1931 

Convocation of EdentonAppropriation 
supplementary to present appropri- 
ation for additional service and 
equipment of field __ $ 1,200.00 

Additional salary — teacher "Brook- 
lyn" Mission . 120.00 



Total ...... $ 1,320.00 



Grand Total ... $ 60,578.00 

* * * 

'Tro^ram For Fall Work 

(Suggested by the Field Department and adopted by the 
clergy at a Conference in St. Peter's, Wash- 
ington, September 23, 1930) 

JOY 

NOTHING gives more joy than to have a real 
task and do it well. Our task, as outlined 
in this program, is to prepare ourselves for real 
service for Him and to go with Him into all parts 



The Mission Herald 



will mean hard work for most of us, but it should 
also mean happiness for it is in His service that 
we find the greatest joy. 

Inspiration 
The need today is to realize that this is a great 
spiritual effort and has been since the inaugur- 
ation of the Nation-Wide Campaign. The aim 
today is the same as then: 

"Every member a worshipper 
Every worshipper a worker 
Every worker a giver 
Every giver a spiritual force." 
The Every Member Canvass in our parishes 
and missions will not degenerate into a mere drive 
for money, if we remember that it is "not by 
might nor by power" but by the spirit of the Lord 
that the best work is done. 

That we may realize this fully and receive the 
strength we need for our work, the Program pro- 
vides for a Quiet Day in each parish and mission 
to be conducted by the clergy before November 
9th. "Stewardship" has been suggested as a sub- 
ject for the addresses. 

Education 
The Quiet Day should be followed by meetings 
for educational purposes. 

1. One in the afternoon for members of 
the Woman's Auxiliary and other women of 
the parish or mission for the study of the 
Bndget for next year and for careful consider- 
ation of the literature for this fall, including 
the General Church folders and the October 
issue of the October issue of the Mission 
Herald. 

2. Another that night for men for the 
same purpose. 

3. Then one for the young people. 

As it is very important for all the people to 
have this information, the canvassers are request- 
ed to carry it to those not present at these meet- 
ings. The personal element in this work is es- 
sential. Please don't send a letter, send a man 
or woman." 

Too much cannot be said regarding the im- 
portance of these meetings and the follow-up. 

The pledges of our people will depend largely 
upon the information and inspiration they re- 
ceive during this period. Ignorance of needs 
rather than unwillingness is usually at the roots 
of our financial difficulties. The accomplish- 
ments, needs and opportunities of Parish, Diocese 
and General Church should therefore be clearly 
presented and fully discussed. 
Consecretion 

The Every Member Canvass is a time for the 
consecration and re-consecration of our people. 



A time when they can say in a real sense: "Here 
we offer and present unto Thee, O Lord, our- 
selves.'* May the Every Member Canvass Sunday, 
November 16th, be used this year for this definite 
purpose and may our people be asked to bring 
their pledge cards to the Church and place them 
on the Alms Bason as an offering of the best they 
have for His use. 

The Canvassers should call on those who cannot 
attend the service or for some other reason did not 
make a pledge to give them an opportunity to have 
a part in this offering. 

Our Standing 

We must know the results of this offering as 
soon as possible after Every Member Canvass 
Sunday in order to make our plans for the next 
year. It has been recommended that the clergy 
of each district and the Executive Secretary or 
some other member of the Field Department meet 
early in December for a study of the reports. 

One of our National Secretaries has said: we 
plan "to employ Personal Evangelism and the 
Every Member Canvass in the interest of a 
healthier, more spiritual Church." This is the 
real purpose of our Program for this fall. 

$ 4c - $ 

FAITH AND YOUTH PROGRAM 

THIS full the first time in the history of the 
American Church, we are to have a Church- 
wide mission for older boys and young men, plan- 
ned and promoted by the national leaders of the 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew but prepared for use 
in all parishes regardless of whether or not they 
have Brotherhood chapters. 

The Presiding Bishop has issued a signed state- 
ment giving his cordial approval to the Program 
and expressed the hope that it will be widely used. 
Bishop Darst, Chairman of the National Commis- 
sion on Evangelism, has issued a similar state- 
ment. The recent National Junior Convention, 
at Oberlin, Ohio, with four hundred boys from 43 
dioceses and missionary districts, voted enthusias- 
tic endorsement and pledged their cooperation in 
carrying through the program. 

The Program, which will be known as the "Faith 
and Youth" Program, centers in a series of seven 
afternoon conferences on the essentials of Christi- 
an truth. Christian life and Christian service, 
with specially prepared worship services and ma- 
terial for leaders' addresses issued by the Brother- 
ohod headquarters. At the closing afternoon ser- 
vice, there will be an opportunity for boys to de- 
termine upon some definite step in Christian liv- 
ing that they will undertake, and on the following 
morning (Advent Sunday, November 30th) the 



October, 1930 



IS 



Program will culminate in the nation-wide annual 
Corporate Communion of men and boys. 

Plans for the conservation and systematic fol- 
low-up of this Program are furnished by the 
National Headquarters of the Brotherhood, and 
leaders call attention to the fact that the follow- 
up is even more important than the program it- 
self. 

Full information may be secured from Leon C. 
Palmer, General Secretary of the Brotherhood 
of St. Andrew. 202 South 19th St., Philadelphia. 
Supplies, put up in packages for parishes of vary- 
ing sizes are furnished at cost. 

% >'fi ^< 

ST. MARYS SCHOOL OP^NS 

SAINT MARY'S School and Junior College. 
Raleigh. North Carolina, opened for its 89th 
annual session on the 18th of September. Rev. 
Warren W. Way, Rector, conducted the services 
of morning prayer in Saint Mary's Chapel, which 
constituted the formal opening of the Fall term. 
In the chancel with Dr. Way were the Raleigh 
members of the Episcopal clergy. 

The Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, Bishop of 
North Carolina, presented the Rt. Rev. Edwin A. 
Penick, Bishop Coadjutor, to the congregation of 
new and returning students, faculty members and 
officers. Bishop Penick spoke forcefully, present- 
ing a helpful message on his behalf and that of the 
Board of Trustees. Mingled with the welcome 
he so cordially extended was an earnest injunction 
to each of his auditors to rise above the ordinary 
and to succeed regardless of circumstances. 

The student body at Saint Mary's this year is 
large, numbering among its members young ladies 
from every Southern State, from all along the 
Atlantic Seaboard, from as far as Colorado and 
from China. 

* * * 

THOMPSON ORPHANAGE NOTES 

EVERY summer, shortly before the opening of 
school, it has been customary to hold a "Stunt 
Nite" in the Auditorium. The official announcer 
for many years has been Mr. Yates, who contri- 
butes much to the success of the Evening. The 
Judges this year Were Mr. Preston. H. Partridge, 
Mrs. Leila D. Simpson and Mrs. A. S. Bynum. 
The decision was difficult t omake as several of 
the students were of almost equal excellence. "At- 
lantic City Bathing Beauties of 1930" and "Wade 
Webb's black face Minstrels" were finally chosen 
as the two best. 

A very enjoyable supper and party w a s 
given the Girls Friendly Branch at the Parish 
House of the Church of the Holy Comforter by 
Mrs. Darrow and her assistants on Friday Even- 
ing, August 29th. 



School opened on Saturday morning, August 
30, with the Orphanage children moving "En Mas- 
se" towards the City Schools. This year there 
are 8 in Central High School, 24 in Junior High 
and 53 in the Grammar Schools, with 21 in the 
Orphanage Kindergarten. 

On the first Sunday in September, Bishop Pen- 
ick visted the Orphanage and in St. Mary's Chap- 
el, celebrated the Holy Communion, Preached and 
administered the Apostolic rite of Confirmation,. 
Six candidates were confirmed, Robert Haywood 
Brady, Clinton Paul Keever, Robert House Pow- 
ell, Charles Tarleton, Fred McKee and Hester Lee 
Smart. 

Saint Mary's Chapel is in need of a new Altar 
Book for the services at the Altar. We sincerely 
hope some one may be glad of this chance to 
place a Memorial Altar Book on the Altar of the 
Orphanage Chapel in loving remembrance of some 
dear one departed. 

The Young Peoples Service League gave a de- 
lightful social at Christ Church Cottage for Mr.. 
Yates on the eve of his departure for Sewanee and 
in grateful recognition of all that he had done for 
the pleasure of the Orphanage family during his 
vacation in Charlotte. 

Only once each year, on Thanksgiving Day, and 
by Canonical Authorization of each Diocese, an 
offering is asked for the Maintenance Fund of the 
Orphanage. Week end trips, foot ball games, 
family reunions and dinners, and other activities 
seem to be more and more diverting our church 
people from the service on Thanksgiving Day. 
The result being in some, perhaps many cases, 
that the offering is not made and of course the 
Orphanage suffers. Perhaps it is not too early,, 
in this issue of our Church Paper to remind every 
one to begin laying aside now a generous offering 
for the children who have been entrusted to our 
care. 

* 

THOMPSON ORPHANAGE 

r\ /J T the last meeting of the Thompson Or- 
\^sL phanage Executive Committee, the follow- 
ing resolution was proposed and unanimously 
adopted. 

"Resolved that the Bishops of the three 
dioceses of North Carolina, and the Execu- 
tive Committee, request the clergy of the 
state to appoint in their respective parishes 
and missions, a Thompson Orphanage Com- 
mittee, with one member at least, preferably, 
a member of the vestry or mission commit- 
tee." 

This committee is to assist in working up th« 
Thanksgiving offering for the orphanage, and al- 
so to aid in the investigation of applications from 



16 



The Mission Herald 



that parish or mission neighborhood and to fol- 
low up boys and girls who leave the orphanage 
and come to live in that parish or mission vicinity. 
Bishop Darst has written us heartily approving 
the resolution and asking that when the names 
of the members of such committee are sent us, 
a copy also be sent to Rev. W. R. Noe, at Wil- 
mington. 

Appreciating your prompt cooperation with this 
request, and with every good wish. 

W. H. WHEELER, 

Superintendent, 
* % % 

■*■ 
A Tra r a a 9n« a 



Woman § Auxiliary 

Mrs. George. F. Hili., Elizabeth City 



N. C. 



S Publicity Chairman £ 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

THE subject for the study this fall is India ; the 
book recommended is "India on the march" 
by Alden H. Clark and it may be obtained from 
the Book Store, 281 Fourth Ave., New York, N. Y. 
The price is 60c ; an outline for the leader is 10c. 
The date suggested in the program for beginning 
the study is October 24th, and five sessions are 
allotted to this subject. As there are seven chap- 
ters, it will be necessary to combine some of them. 
This can easily be done, 1 think. The book is 
very interesting and readable. 

If your Auxiliary does not have weekly meet- 
ings, I would suggest that you have an intensive 
period of a few weeks this fall and use this book 
for your programs. We have planned to finish 
the study of this subject this year so that we can 
have one of a different nature for Epiphany and 
Lent. 

The Diocese has a new Field Secretary for Re- 
ligious and Young People's Work, Miss Harris, 
who will be a great help to us in putting over our 
educational program. As I understand it she will 
visit every church in the Diocese in the interest 
of the church schools and will also give us, the 
women of the Auxiliary, the benefit of her wide 
^experience. 

Hoping that you will find the study of India 
interesting and illuminating. 

MAE WOOD WINSLOW 
* * * 

SUGGESTIONS FOR U. T. O. PROGRAMS 

1. Missionary Hymn. 

2. U. T. O. Prayer in Unison. (Copies enough 
tor everybody). 

3. Story of the U. T. 0. told, not read. It is 
^hrillingly romantic. 

4. Resolution on U. T. O. for this Triennium 



carefully explained. It is printed on back of prayer 
card. State U. T. 0. Objectives. 

5. Explain difference between the Corporate 
Gift of the Woman's Auxiliary and U. T. O. Ob- 
jectives for present Triennium. 

6. Use October Spirit of Missions. Mission 
Herald, Woman's Auxilary Leaflets 104 and 106 
(especially the latter) in getting up programs, 
and urge daily use of the Little Blue Box, with 
prayer for more workers in the Mission Field. 

Let's fire our efforts with plenty of information 
and spiritual imagination. 

Leaflets may be secured very cheaply from the 
Woman's Auxiliary. 281 Fourth Ave., New York. 
(Mrs. C. J.) FOY A. SAWYER, 

U. T. O. Custodian for the Diocese 
* * * 

PATTERSON SCHOOL, LEDGERWOOD, N. C 

ON the fine ancestral estate in the Happy Valley 
at the foot of the Blue Ridge in Caldwell 
County, North Carolina, the Church is conducting 
an Industrial School for white boys. 

The Patterson School, as it is called, is the re- 
sult of the wise generosity of the late Hon. S. L. 
Patterson, Commissioner of Agriculture of the 
State of North Carolina, and of his widow, the late 
Mary S. Patterson, both of whom left the property 
to the Board of Trustees of the Missionary Dis- 
trict of Asheville as the site for this school. This 
property comprises about 1,350 acres of land, 300 
acres of which are cleai'ed and in cultivation, a 
large dwelling and the usual outbuildings. It is 
located in the beautiful Yadkin Valley. Caldwell 
County, North Carolina. 

The object of the school is: First; to give to 
poor boys, fourteen years of age and upwards, 
the very best schooling. Second : To afford them 
the opportunity of paying their own Avay com- 
pletely. The school is equipped to prepare boys 
either for a direct return to the farm upon gradu- 
ation, or for entrance into any college or technical 
school. Every boy entering the school is requir- 
ed to pay for his board in labor, which he does by 
working three hours every school day. The tu- 
ition may be paid either in cash or labor, the boy 
working on the school farm during the summer 
vacation. Money for clothing and incidentals may 
also be earned by crediting boys for extra work 
done. The Patterson School thus takes its place 
as the only secondary school in the United States 
wherein any poor boy may pay his own way com- 
pletely. 

The Agricultural Department comprises in- 
struction in theory in the class room, practical ex- 
periments and work in the field and such other 
work for the boys as must necessarily be done on 
any farm. Definite instruction is given by the 



October. 1930 



17 



school agriculturist in soils, their structure and 
treatment, fertilizers, the care of the orchards, 
principles underlying the preparation of t h e 
ground for various crops and their subsequent 
cultivation, how to judge live stock and how to 
care for it, and the numerous other matters with 
farming which the up-to-date farmer must know, 
including a practical system of farm bookkeeping. 

One of the most disintegrating influences in the 
South today is the tendency of the mills to draw 
all of the small farmers from the hills to the 
cotton-mill villages and to put young and old alike 
into the mill rooms. And so the soil, after hav- 
ing been robbed of its strength, is now being rob- 
bed of the people, who, even though inefficiently, 
were tilling it. The significance of the Patterson 
School and its idea lies in the fact that it: — and 
schools on the same plan inevitably will follow 
it — must act as an opposing force to this move- 
ment toward the mills and factories, because it 
will give the young men the general education 
that they need, and equip them to cultivate the 
soil properly, not wastefully, as their ancestors 
tilled it. 

In September 1909, the Rev. M. S. Taylor took 
charge as principal with great energy, devotion 
and judgement he laid the foundations, assisted 
by the Rev. A. S. Lawrence. Except for a few 
thousand dollars, devised by Mrs. Patterson, there 
was nothing for equipment so that the principal 
and his assistant were obliged to raise the funds 
to start things. Upon Mr. Tayloi-'s resignation 
in 1914, the Rev. Hugh A. Dobbin was appointed 
principal and still remains at the head of the 
school. Mr. Dobbins is a mountaineer, born and 
nurtured among tliese "everlasting hills'", dis- 
ciplined in a Church family upon a mountain farm, 
teaching a public school and having had the ad- 
vantage of a term at the State Agricultural Col- 
lege. Then came the vision of the sacred minis- 
try, through which he saw what good he might 
accomplish among hi sown people. From the 
Valle Crucis Mission which he had largely helped 
to develop he came to Patterson School. 

The New Dormitory — Gard Memorial Hall — was 
completed in 1924 by fitting up basement for din- 
ing room and kitchen. This valuable structure 
was made possible by the initial gift of $10,000 
by Mrs. Charles E. Gard, of Lenoir, N. C, to which 
she has added other material gifts at different 
intervals. 

The Sarah Lenoir Library, a nice brick building, 
was completed in 1923. This was made possible 
by the legacy of the late Mrs. Ruf us Lenoir, whose 
estate adjoins the school, as a memorial to her 
sister, Miss Sarah. This library needs to be re- 
plenished with new and up to date books. Be- 



sides serving the purpose of library, the various 
clubs of the community have their meetings and 
entertainments there. 

The Old Ancestrial home, which was destroyed 
by fire on Easter Monday, 1925, is being replaced 
with a new brick fire-proof building, which will 
accomodate 80 boys, and also will have rooms for 
the workers and class rooms on the first floor. 
The third floor of this building is completed and 
is occupied with students. 

Very few boys are able to pay cash as is re- 
quired, and are necessarily obliged to rely on 
scholarships, allowing them to do what work they 
can towards paying their expenses. 

Six hours a day there is a regular school session. 
The boys all work every day as a part of their 
training — there are acres of wheat and corn, rye 
and oats, potatoes and all vegetables in season. 
There is a dairy which gives milk and butter as 
well as the beef cattle for market. There are 
hogs of aristocratic lineage for meat and money, 
and the pigs are in great demand. There is a 
chicken yard which helps feed the school. There 
are bees, an object lesson of industry. A stranger 
passing can recognize that this is an industrial 
school by seeing a dozen to twenty-five boys in a 
twenty-acre field with their hoes, following a half 
dozen mules pulling a cultivator, or if the saw mill 
is running he can see the same number hacking 
lumber or loading the truck with gravel from the 
Yadkin River. If the wood working machinery 
is being run by the motor, one can see a half dozen 
lads taking the lumber from the planer and load- 
ing on trucks or wagons — the famous old mill on 
the place has been repaired to grind their own 
meal and flour. The old blacksmith shop has been 
replenished with new tools to enable us to do first. 
class smithing. The old store house has been 
converted into a wood working shop with all ma- 
chinery necessary for fixing lumber ready for 
building. This machinery is run by electric power 
purchased from a company that is located three 
miles above our own water power, which is idle 
save what service it does running the old mill.. 
The old negro kitchen has been converted into a 
laundry and shower baths, which are a great com- 
fort to the boys in the winter, but bathing in the 
Yadkin River is the Patterson School boys' de- 
light in summer. 

Th^ progress of the school has been maae 
through trials and tribulations, but has been keep- 
ing with the times — the school has now, Febru- 
ary 1928, a full corps of competent teachers and 
workers among them two or three former stu- 
dents. This is a practical result of the work of 
the school.. 



IS 



The Mission Herald 



STANDING ROCK MISSION, WAKPALA, S. D. 

THE Standing Rock reservation is located part- 
ly in North Dakota and partly in South Da- 
kota just west of the Missouri river, and covers 
a vast territory of some 2.000 square miles with 
3.666 Indians of the Dakota tribe living within 
its borders in 1928. The South Dakota section 
of the reservation contains close to 1,200 square 
miles and about 1,500 Indians. It is this portion 
that is known as the Standing Rock Mission with 
headquarters at St. Elizabeth's Mission, Wakpala. 

The Church maintains six chapels and a preach- 
ing station to care for the religious needs of her 
people of whom there are 580 baptized members, 
441 of them being confirmed. The work of this 
Mission is under the supervision of the Rev. K. 
Brent Woodruff. He is assisted by a corpse of 
native workers consisting of one priest, one dea- 
con, three catechists, and two helpers. This as- 
sures a service being held every Sunday at every 
chapel. The two priests try to visit the seven 
posts once each month to administer the Holy 
Communion. They very much resemble the cir- 
cuit riders of another day going from town to 
town to conduct services, only they do not go from 
town to town as the chapels are mainly located 
in the open country, St. Philip's being 27 miles 
from Isabel, the nearest town, and 96 miles from 
Glencross, its nearest town with a railroad. In 
fact, not a one of the seven chapels is located on 
a railroad so it is no wonder that Mr. Woodruff 
finds a car of prime importance since he travels 
on the average close to 2,000 miles a month. 

The Indians served by this Mission are extreme- 
ly poor (there are no oil wells in South Dakota). 
The home of the average Indian is a little log hut 
about 9 x 16 feet in size. Most of them now have 
wooden floors in them. Usually there are two 
windows and a door in such a hut which is divided 
into two rooms. Here the Indian with his family 
of several children lives, miles from a bright light 
and wholesome recreation. Into this rather dis- 
mal atmosphere comes the missionary. He comes 
to bring some of that abundant life our Saviour 
told us about. But many times before he can 
touch the people very deeply in a spiritual way 
(the Indians are very spiritual people and love 
their Church most sincerely) he must care for 
their more material needs: sickness, lack of suffi- 
cient clothing or food, and such like. Instruction 
must be given to the mother so that she may make 
her home a better place to live in. and encourage- 
ment must be given to the father to work in order 
to earn money to provide for the needs of his 
family. The Indians take kindly to such visits 
of the missionary, and it is a regretable fact that 



such a limited number of families can be reached 
by the one white missionary. The need is great 
for more trained workers. 

St. Elizabeth's School for boys and girls is on 
this reservation. This school has the distinction 
of being the only Indian boarding school in South 
Dakota, and possibly in the whole United States, 
where an Indian boy can have the opportunity 
to receive an accredited high school education. 
Last year there were 59 children enrolled, 36 girls 
and 23 boys, ranging from 6 to 18 years of age. 
The influence of this school on the life of the re- 
servation is readily observable. A visit to a few 
Indian homes establishes its value. 

Outside the supplies to aid in the material re- 
lief of the people, the greatest need is more work- 
ers. The native helpers do splendidly for their 
ability but they do not have the training necessary 
for the task of social readjustment which is the 
problem now to be solved in as much as 99% of 
the population is nominally Christian. Another 
white priest and two social workers could be used 
to good advantage right today on Standing Rock. 
The younger people are being attracted to unde- 
sirable places. The Church must come forward 
with a wholesome program to counteract this. 
We need help. 



31 



zm zmtniorimn 

T^ NTERED into life eternal Francis Badham 
i j Warren, son of William Young and Frances 
Roulhac Warren, on the morning of September 
fourteenth, 1930. 

The subject of this tribute was born September 
tenth, 1873, in Chowan County, a short distance 
from Edenton. His early life was spent on the 
beautiful old plantation, "Beechwood", with its 
colonial home standing white and classic against 
the dark background of majestic trees. Here 
surrounded with the devotion of parents, brothers 
and sisters he reached manhood with a heart un- 
sullied and a spirit without guile. Educated at 
the Horner Military School, he proved a good 
student and later in life when engaged in his chos- 
en work in a large mill in Texas, he developed a 
practical ability and an ingenius talent for ma- 
chinery which found expression in an invention 
which was afterward patented and used in mills. 

During these years of practical endeavor he was 
connected with the Morton Milling Company, of 
Dallas, Texas, having left North Carolina more 
than thirty years ago for the broad plains of the 
"Lone Star State" which thereafter became his 



October. 1930 



19 



adopted state. Here his character bi'oadened in- 
to channels of industry and generosity, here he 
was advanced to the office of general superinten- 
dent, a position he held for many years until the 
sudden termination of his life by an accidental 
fall from the top of the mill. Various and delight- 
ful trips to his native state kept him in touch 
with his adored mother and family, residing in 
Eden ton, New Berne, and Trenton, respectively. 

After the sad accident his beloved remains, ac- 
companied by Mr. E. B. Mangum. of the Morton 
Milling Company, were brought to Edenton and 
interred in St. Paul's Churchyard, the venerable 
rector, the Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D., afficiating. 
Here at last, life's journey over, surrounded by 
loving hearts and blooming flowers, we left him 
with his forefathers beneath the blue vault of 



heaven, resting in the soft lap of Mother. Earth, 
in God's acre, in God's good keeping. 
"Asleep in Jesus, blessed sleep 
From which none ever wakes to weep." 

—MARY ALETHEA WARREN 



PRINCIPLES OF GIVING 

"If thou hast much, give plentiously; if thou 
hast little, do thy diligence gladly to give of that 
little." 

A way must be open for all, that all may give. 

Large gifts ought to be so placed as to offer no 
barrier to small gifts. 

Small gifts ought not to be discouraged by as- 
surance that large gifts will meet all needs. 

In the ideal parish every member is a share- 
holder in faith and works. 



87.50 
10.40 

50,00 
56.25 

38.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Statement of Amounts Paid on Apportionments for the Church's Program — Diocesan 

and General to October 1st, 1930 

Paid by Columbia. St. Andrew's 300.00 50.00 175.00 

... Parishes & Edenton. St. John-Evangelist 150.0(1 105.00 7.50 

L ° Ciai °" 1>ir '* i ' ApporLunm-nt ^ Rchoojs Oct. 1.,. ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ UM ,,„ 

PARISHES b'airfield. All Saint's ._ .... 20.00 20.00 

Atkinson. St. Thomas' . $ 100.00 $ 14.33 * 60.67 Faison, St. Gabriel's 50.00 25.00 12.50 

Ayden, St. James' 820.00 24.35 215.65 Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 100.0(1 75.00 

Aurora, Holy Cross - — 500.00 106.00 269.00 Kinston, St. Augustine's 50.00 35.00 2.50 

Bath, St. Thomas' .._ 100.00 34.50 40.50 Lumborton, Trinity 100.00 84.72 

Beaufort,, St. Paul's - 600.00 216.80 233.20 Maxton, St. Matthew's .... .. 25.00 18.75 

Belhaven; St. James' . ... - 500.00 260.44 114.56 Morehead City, St. Andrew'* .... 70.00 82.42 

Bonnerton, St. John's - 100.00 58.35 16.65 North West. All Souls' 40.00 37.50 

Chocowinity, Trinity 100.00 13.65 61.35 Oriental, St. Thomas* 10.00 10.00 

Clinton, St. Paul's - 400.00 36.07 263.93 Pikevjlle. Mission 50.00 

Cr.swell. St. David's ..._. 700.00 101.07 363.93 Roxobei, St. Mark's ....... 125.00 83.36 

Kdcnton,' St. Paul's 2,500.00 1,617.30 257.70 Sladesville, St. John's 30.00 30.00 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church ___ 2,000.00 1.166.67 333.38 Snow Htll. St. Barnabas' 200.00 tOO.O'i 

Farmville, Emmanuel .. _ 400.00 16.00 284.00 Sunbury, St. Peter's 76.00 _ __ 

Fayettcvillc. St. John's 3.300.00 1,466.45 1,008.55 g wan Quarter. Calvary «0.0« 7.00 

Fa'yetteviHe, St. Joseph's 200.00 51.06 98.94 Trenton. Grace Church 125.00 106.40 

<;s;«-3ville, St. Mary's . . 200.00 64.95 85.06 Warsaw. Calvary 40.00 

(ioldsboro! St. Stephen's 1,200.00 300.00 600.00 Washington, St. Paul's loO.OO 50.00 

Greenville, St. Paul's 1,500.00 875.00 250.00 Whiteville, Grace Church 90.00 10.50 

OviCLon, St. John's 260-00 9.63 177.87 Winterville. St. Luke's ......... 200.00 166.00 

Hamilton, St. Martin's 100.00 50.00 25.00 Wrighteville, St. Andrew's 100.00 51.01 

Hertford, Holy Trinity 1.000. 00 175.00 575.00 yeatwille, St. Matthew's 100.00 53.70 

Hone Mills, Christ Church 150.00 22.00 90.50 

Jessama, Zion . 125.00 '2.66 21.19 UNORGANIZED MISSIONS 

•vmstoii, St. Mary's 1,800.00 225.00 1,125.00 Aurora, St. Jude's 50.00 

Lake Landing, St. George's ... 125.00 119.73 Avoca, Holy Innocents' 100.00 50.00 

New Bern, Christ Church . 3.000.00 647.26 1.602.76 Beaufort, St. Clement's 40.00 11.00 

New Bern. St. Cyprian's ...... 4-UOJto 319.91 Greenville, St. Andrew's ..... 50.0" 15.00 

Plymouth, Grace Church 400.00 125.00 175.00 Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's «5.00 

Red Spring's. St. Stephen's . . 100.00 42.00 33.00 .! aspe r, St. Thomas' ............ 50.00 23.53 

Roper. St. Luke's 350.00 186.45 76.05 Murfreesboro. St. Barnabas' .... 50.00 16.00 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' . 240.00 180.00 Pollocksville, Mission 48.00 16.64 

Southport, St. Philip's 250.00 93.70 93.80 Robersonville, Mission .. 26.00 

Vanceboro. St. Paul's 50.00 7.50 30.00 Roper. St. Ann's ... 26.00 3.11 

Washington, St. Peter's - — 3,500.00 1,711.12 913.88 Williamston. St. Ignatius' . 30.00 19.65 

Williamston, Advent . 300.00 25.07 199.93 Wilmington, "Brooklyn'', Mission 16. CM) 10. On 

Wilmington, Good Shepherd 800.00 353.86 Wrightsville, St. Aimustine's . 20.00 10.00 

Wilmington. St. James' 18,380.01/ 9,364.17 670.83 

Wilmington St. John's 3,000.00 2,018.19 231.81 PAROCHIAL MISSIONS 

Wilmingtoi, St. Mark's 200.00 197.75 — Gampbelton, St. Phillip's 100.00 12.07 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 2,000.00 734.53 765.47 Kinston, Christ Church 50.00 30.00 

Windsor, St Thomas' 800.00 101..10 348.90 Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd ._ _ 46.00 13.00 

Winton, St. John's 200.00 150.00 

Woodville, (irae- Church . 500.00 67. IS 307.87 Total Apportionments— 1930 $ »0,303.00 

Amount, due to October 1st — 9 months 

ORGANIZED MISSIONS Paid by Parishes. Missions and Church Schools 

Belhaven, St. Mary's ... - 106.00 14.00 64.75 

Uvirgaw, St. Mary's . .. . 100.00 42.60 32.40 Balance due to October 1st .... $ 13.177.59 



30.00 
62.50 
57.00 

23.99 
21.30 



37.60 

25.00 

19.00 

22.50 

6.40 

13.97 

21.50 

19.36 

18.76 

15.64 

2.85 

1.25 

5.00 



32.93 
7.50 

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The Mission Herald 



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VOL. XLIV 



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No. 11 




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2 

NOVEMBER INDEX Page 

B. S. A. Corporate Communion 2 

Bishop's Letter 3 

Bishop's Appointments 3 

Christian Service Illustrated 4 

Dr. Disosway Speaks 4 

Shall They Have Their Chance? 5 

The Vestryman 5 

The Congregation 5 

Bath 6 

Sermon by Dr. Huske 6 

Editorials 8 

East Carolina News 9 

Woman's Auxiliary — 

News of our Workers _, 10 

Christmas Boxes 11 

Convocation of Edenton .„.„*. 11 

Letter from Mrs. Shelburne 11 

A Lay Missionary 12 

Lambeth Resolutions 14 

Financial Statement 15 

* * * 

NATION-WIDE CORPORATE COMMUNION OF 
MEN AND BOYS OF THE CHURCH 

THE thirteenth annual Nation-wide Corporate 
Com'munion of the Men and Boys of the 
Church will be observed on the First Sunday in 
Advent, November 30, and because of the "Faith 
and Youth" Program during the preceding week, 
leading up to this, it is expected that an even larg- 
er number than usual will take part this year. 

While this observance i s promoted b y the 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew, it is for all men and 
confirmed boys of the Church. The number of 
parishes participating has increased each year, 
until it has now come to be one of the outstanding 
annual events in the life of the Church. Coming, 
as it does this year, immediately preceding the 
Every-Member Canvass, it will have especial value 
as a spiritual preparation for that endeavor. 

Supplies for the Corporate Communion, includ- 
ing posters, invitation cards, and preparation leaf- 
lets, may be secured from the Brotherhood of St. 
Andrew in the United States, Church House, 202 
South Nineteenth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

—LEON C. PALMER 



The Mission Herald 

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The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, NOVEMBER, 1930 



No. 11 



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The ^Bishop's Letter 

In my October letter I stated 
that I had preached in St. Thom- 
as', Atkinson, on Sunday, the 
fifth of October, but the man 
who set the type made it read 
"St. Thomas', at Kinston. The 
mistake was a natural one, but 
in order to avoid confusion, I am 
making this correction. 

On Wednesday October the eighth, I attended 
a Reginald meeting of the American Red Cross 
in Chapel Hill, at noon. 

At six-thirty in the evening of the eighth, I at- 
tended a Brotherhood of St. Andrew supper at 
Hotel Cherry, Wilson, and at 8:30 I made an ad- 
dress at a Congregational meeting in St. Timothy's 
Parish House, It was a real privilege to be with 
the Rev. S. W. Hale and his fine people. 

On Sunday, the twelfth, I celebrated Holy Com- 
munion in St, Mary's Church, Kinston, at 7:30 
A. M., and preached and confirmed ten persons, 
presented by the rector, Rev. B. F. Huske, D. D., 
at 11:00 A. M. 

In the afternoon I preached in Christ Chapel, 
East Kinston, and confirmed five persons, present- 
ed by Doctor Huske. 

On the night of the same day I preached and 
confirmed five persons, presented by the Priest in 
charge, Rev. James E. Holder, in St. Augustine's 
Church, Kinston. 

On Wednesday, the fifteenth, I presided at a 
meeting of the National Commission on Evangel- 
ism, in Boston, Mass. 

On Sunday, the nineteenth, at the morning ser- 
vice, I preached and confirmed five persons, pre- 
sented by the Rector, Rev. Arthur H. Marshall, 
in the Church of the Advent, Williamston. At 
3:30 in the afternoon, I preached in Trinity Mis- 
sion, Bear Grass, and at night I preached and con- 
firmed two persons, presented by the Rev. Mr. 
Marshall, in St. Martin's Church, Hamilton. 

On Wednesday, the twenty-second, I had the 
privilege of being with the people of St. Paul's. 
Clinton, at their Parish supper at 6:30 P. M., and 
at 8:00 P. M., I preached and confirmed four per- 
sons, presented by the Rev. Frank D. Dean, M. D., 
in St. Paul's Church. 

On Sunday, the twenty-eighth, I celebrated Holy 
Communion in St. Mary's House, Greensboro, at 
8:00 A. M., and made an address to the members 
of the Student Church Club, at 7:00 P. M. 



At the morning service, en the twenty-eighth, 
I preached in Holy Trinity, Greensboro, for our 
good friend and former East Carolina Clergyman, 
Rev. J. Reginald Mallett. 

On Thursday, the thirtieth, I preached in St. 
Mark's Church, Roxobel, at 7:30 P. M., and con- 
firmed three persons, presented by the Rector. 
Rev. A. J. Mackie. 

On Friday, the thirty-first, I preached in Grace 
Church, Woodville, at 7:30 P. M. 

On Saturday, November the first, I visited 
Ahoskie and was delighted to note the splendid 
progress that had been made in the erection of 
our attractive Church in that town. It looks now 
as if the Church may be ready for occupancy be- 
fore Christmas. 

On Sunday, November the second, I preached 
in St. Thomas' Church, Windsor, at 11:00 A. ML, 
and at 7:30 P. M., celebrated Holy Communion at 
the morning service. 

This letter is being written on the fourth of 
November, during a twenty-four hour sojourn at 
home. 

I am to speak at a Brotherhood of St. Andrew 
supper in St. Paul's, Wilmington, tonight and will 
leave in the morning for the meeting of the Wil- 
mington Convocation in St. Paul's, Beaufort. 

My schedule for November is a very heavy one, 
including as it does, the meeting of the Synod in 
Jackson, Miss., but I am sure that the mionth will 
be a happy one as I will have the privilege of visit- 
ing a great many of our rural churches during 
that time. With a prayer for God's blessings 
upon us as we face unusual conditions, and un- 
usual opportunities for Christian Service, I am, 

Faithfully and affectionately, your friend and 
Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST 



THE BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS 
From November 21st, to December 31st. 

November — 

21. St. Matthew's, Yeatesville, 7:30 P. M. 

23. St. George's, Lake Landing, 11:00 A. M, 
All Saints, Fairfield, 3:30 P. M. 
Calvary, Swan Quarter, 7:30 P. M. 

24. St. John's, Sladesville, 7 :30 P. M. 

25. St. James', Belhaven, 7:30 P. M. 

30. Christ Church, Creswell, 11:00 A. M. 
Galilee Mission, Lake Phelps, 3 :30 P. M. 
St. Andrew's. Columbia, 7:30 P. M. 



December — 

1. St. Luke's, Roper, 7 :30 P. M. 

2. Grace Church, Plymouth, 7:30 P. M. 
7. St. Stephen's, Goldsboro, 11:00 A. M. 

St. George's, Pikeville, 4 :00 P. M. 

St. Andrew's, Goldsboro, 7 :30 P. M. 
14. Holy Trinity, Hertford, 11:00 A. M. 

St. Joseph's, Camden, 4:00 P. M. 

Christ Church, Elizabeth City, 7 :30 P. M. 
21. St. Paul's Church, Edenton, 11 :00 A. M. 

Mission, Mege, 3:30 P. M. 

St. John Evangelist, Edenton, 7:30 P. M. 
28. St. Andrew's, Wrightsville, 11:00 A. M. 

Delgado Mission, Wilmington, 4:00 P. M. 
* * * 

CHRISTIAN SERVTCE ILLUSTRATED 

WHEN a speaker inspires us through a mes- 
sage on Christian Service we may do a 
bit here and there and be satisfied with our small 
efforts. 

There is an illustration of real Christian Service 
found in East Carolina that will be hard to match. 
No speaker inspired it except Jesus Himself, nor 
was it a service of an hour. This service grew 
naturally out of the heart of a consecrated man 
and woman, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Cox, of Winterville. 
Mrs. Cox is the daughter of Mrs. Polly Smith, 
one of the great missionary saints of East Caro- 
lina. 

Mr. J. D. Cox went to his reward but a month 
ago. He was a Christian who met death unafraid, 
glad to be at Home with God. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cox had no children of their own, 
but they did have a real Christian home, and into 
this home they have taken five orphan children 
to raise as their own, spending on them all their 
love and care as only real Christians can. 

Jamie E. Cox was the first boy ; he came to Mr. 
and Mrs. Cox when four years of age. He is now 
a very successful farmer at Apple Grove, Va., a 
pattern to his neighbors in integrity, Christian 
living and manhood. He is now married with a 
large, happy family. Mr. and Mrs. Cox have 
spent the past ten summers with him. 

George Herbert Cox was the second boy, who 
now owns and operates the Cox Motor Co., at 
Robersonville. He came to Mr. and Mrs. Cox at 
the age of 16 years and is now a successful bus- 
iness man, a leader in all things good, a fine ex- 
arriple of a Christian gentleman and a hard worker 
in the Church. 

George Loren Edwards was the third boy, now 
professor of history at Campbell Junior College, 
Buie's Creek. He came into the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Cox when sixteen years of age. Again we 
naturally find a Christian gentleman. 



The Mission Herald 

Miss Laura V. Cox was the first girl. She made 
her home with Mr. and Mrs. Cox for seventeen 
years. She was a missionary in Mexico until the 
war compelled her to leave. She is now teaching 
at Kenansville and is considered as one of the best 
in the State, not only in her profession but as a 
representative of a fine Christian home. 

Mrs. A. T. Uzzle of Bonita Springs, Florida, was 
with Mr. and Mrs. Cox six years, when she marri- 
ed. They are successful bee farmers and stand 
high in their city for Christian living. 

While most of us wonder what to do to be of 
service, Mr. and Mrs. Cox have been at work doing 
real Christian service. In their home where Christ 
was loved and lived, five orphan children were 
raised to manhood and womanhood, and who, when 
they went out into the world, went with Christian 
hearts and Christian strength. 

What joy and peace it must bring to the heart 
of the last of this consecrated couple now to have 
the deep love of her five children and in seeing 
them true followers of her Lord, and in knowing 
that she has served her Savior in loving service 
to others ! "Inasmuch as ye did it .... ". 

— G. F, HILL 



DR. LULA DISOSWAY SPEAKS TO PITT 
COUNTY AUXILIARIES 

rr\R LULA DISOSWAY, of New Bern, on fur- 
xJ lough from her duties in the St. Elizabeth 
Hospital, Shanghai, China, was the principal 
speaker at the Get-Together Group Meeting of the 
Woman's Auxiliaries of Pitt County, which was 
held in Farmville Tuesday, September 30. This 
organization comprises the Auxiliaries of Ayden, 
Greenville, Griffon, Winterville and Farmville, and 
a splendid representation was present at this meet- 
ing. 

It was a great pleasure and privilege to have 
Dr. Disosway with us, a woman who is living in 
the largest way possible a life of sanctified service 
and whose chosen path is one of wholehearted 
consecration to God and His Church. Of extra- 
ordinary faculties and strong personality, she has 
rendered conspicious service in the field of medi- 
cine and surgery during the four years she has 
spent in China, and her address, in which she told 
of choosing a profession, training, trip to China 
hospital, experiences, the political situation, and 
her return, completing a trip around the world, 
held her audience spellbound. 

Dr. Disosway's bold disregard to danger, the 
fortitude with which she has met ordeals, her un- 
failing courage, born of faith in God, uphold the 
finest traditions of the Episcopal Churcl 



November. 1930 



SHALL THEY HAVE THEIR CHANCE? 

IN your children's home at Charlotte, one 
hundred and six children are anxiously 
waiting to see whether or not they shall con- 
tinue to be cared for in their comfortable and 
happy home, or whether it will be necessary 
for some of them to find new shelter and new 
foster parents elsewhere. 

YOUR ANSWER WILL BE MADE IN 
YOUR THANKSGIVING OFFERING. This 
offering must be much larger than in former 
years if the work is to go on as at present 
constituted. 

The Thanksgiving Offerings have decreas- 
ed in amount and there has been a tremend- 
ous falling off in individual contributions. 

Only two individuals in the Diocese of East 
Carolina give a regular monthly contribution 
to the current fund. 

The offering on Thanksgiving Day, in for- 
mer years, has been used as a reserve fund 
that could be spread over these months of 
the ensuing year when contributions fall far 
below the expenditures which go on regular- 
ly and relentlessly. This year, however, the 
Thanksgiving Offering will have to be drawn 
on heavily, if not entirely, to pay bills that 
are long past due. No bills have been paid 
since July 1, 1930. 

If this situation is to be met. each member 
of the Church must realize his responsibility 
for supporting the maintenance fund of the 
Orphanage. 

The many friends of the Orphanage have 
never failed yef to rise to the support of the 
home, and we are confident they will not fail 
us now in the face of this emergency. 






WHAT THE CONGREGATION MAY EXPECT 
OF THE VESTRY 

1. An annual budget of parish expenses. 

2. An annual report of parish finances. 

3. That the parish property should be kept in 

good condition. 

4. That insurance on Church property should 

be kept up. 

5. The prompt payment of all Church obliga- 

tions. 

6. An intelligent and active support in the Mis- 

sion (or Church's Program) responsibility 
of the Church. 

7. An adequate support of the parish school of 
religious education. 



8. That all money contributed should be used 

for the explicit purpose for which it was 
given. 

9. That the obligations of the parish to the Dio- 

cese and the general Church are promptly 
paid and regularly forwarded. 

10. That the music, as a part of the worship of 

praise offered to God, is properly rendered 
and financially sustained. 

11. That the salary of the clergy be made and 

kept commensurate with the cost of living. 

12. A regular attendance upon all meetings of 

the vestry. 

13. An intelligent interest in the various de- 

partments of parish work. 

14. The attendance of vestrymen upon the ser- 

vices of the Church. 

15. That the records of the vestry meetings 

should be carefully kept. 

16. That the rector be provided with a car, in or- 

der that his time may be spent to the best 
interest of the parish. The maintenance 
of the car should be borne by the parish. 

17. That there should be an adequate office force 

to care for keeping in order the parish cen- 
sus, the parish account books, the visiting 
lists, and to do the stenographic and type- 
writing work. No board of bank directors 
would expect the bank president to spend 
his time cutting up deposit slips. 

18. That the parish be represented at the dioces- 

an council, and that the representatives 
sent stay through. 

19. That the vestry exercise great care in giving 

the testimonials required for admission to 
Holy Orders. • 

20. That, when necessary, the vestry should act 

as conciliators, seeking to reconcile differ- 
ences arising which threaten to disrupt 
the unity of parish life. 

* * # 

WHAT THE VESTRY MAY EXPECT FROM 

THE CONGREGATION 

The vestry cannot do these things without the 
loyal cooperation of the congregation. As repre- 
sentatives of the people, the vestry have the right 
to ask and expect 

1. A prompt and regular payment of all pledg- 
es made by the people. 

2. That pledges, having been made, be sustain- 

ed in order that the parish budget may be 
lived up to. 

3. That those having made pledges should in- 

crease the amount promised if circumstan- 
ces permit, in order to offset losses incur- 
red by death and removal. 



6 



The Mission Herald 



4. That the financial obligation to the parish be 

the prime obligation to loyalty and not, as 
often is the case, the first point at which a 
cut is made to reduce personal expenditure. 

5. That the people by loyalty, devotion, and har- 

monious cooperation make the parish an 
organization which will give pride to a 
vestry which seeks to render service. 

* * * 

BATH, N. C. 

The Annual Pilgrimage to St. Thomas' Church, 
the oldest Church in the State, was made on No- 
vember 6th. 

The day began with the celebration of the Holy 
Communion by the Bishop of the Diocese, the Rt. 
Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., assisted by the Rev. 
Stephen Gardner, Vicar of the Church, and Rev. 
Joseph N. Bynum, of Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

The address was delivered by the Rev. B. F. 
Huske, D. D., of St. Mary's, Kinston, N. C. He 
suggested that "St. Thomas', Bath, for the Glory 
of God, and in memory of all the known and un- 
known faithful churchmen of this parish and of 
the Colonial Church in North Carolina hereafter 
be designated and known as St. Thomlas', the 
Church of the Unknown Colonist." 

After the address, the Bishop presided over a 
meeting of the Association for the Preservation 
of the Church. The Secretary of the Association, 
the Rev. J. N. Bynum, made a report for the speci- 
al Committee which is seeking to raise $20,000 
to restore the Church to its Colonial dignity. This 
special Committee is state-wide and has as its 
Chairman, the Hon. Josephus Daniels. It is hoped 
that the work of restoration will be completed 
before the 200th Anniversary in 1934. 

* * # 

ANNIVERSARY SERMON 

Old St. Thomas', Bath, N. C, November 6, 1930 

Rev. B. F. Huske, D. D. 
Genisis 12:8. (Part) "Avid there he builded an altar 
unto the Lord, and he called upon the name of the Lord." 

THE officers and members of the Association 
for the Preservation and Restoration of St. 
Thomas' Church, Bath, and their friends have as- 
sembled in this place today in accordance with 
the worthy and devout custom of this Association, 
to participate in an annual service of worship and 
thanksgiving to Almighty God, in reverent com- 
memoration of the faith and works of those splen- 
did colonists and pioneers, and stalwart heroes of 
Christ, who, coming and settling here at this 
beautiful spot on the Pamlico River, in the early 
days of American history, builded here " an altar 
unto the Lord, and called upon the Name of the 
Lord." 

In the fulfillment of such a worthy purpose as 



this, we are assembled today in old St. Thomas' 
Church, Bath, which is the oldest church building 
still standing within the borders of North Caro- 
lina, one of the thirteen original Colonies of Amer- 
ica ; and one of the States participating in the for- 
mation of this Nation. 

The town of Bath, in which St. Thomas' Church 
is situated, is also the oldest town in North Caro- 
lina, dating back to 1706, Bath, so named for one 
of the famous places in England, has an interest- 
ing history which extends back to the early days 
of American colonization. Prior to this early date, 
or to be more exact, in the year 1701, the Parish 
of St. Thomas', Bath, was organized in accordance 
with legal enactment, along with four other Par- 
ishes, which constitute the Five Original Colonial 
Parishes of what is now the State of North Caro- 
lina. 

The names of the Parishes deserve to be pre- 
served: namely, Currituck; St. John's, Pasquo- 
tank; Berkley Parish, Perquimans; St. Paul's, 
Chowan; and St. Thomas', Bath, (or Pamplico). 
The original Colonial Parishes of the Province of 
North Carolina, all date back to the year of 1701. 
In this historic spot, we meet today in the sacred 
building of Old St. Thomas' Church. This build- 
ing was erected in 1734; and therefore is closely 
approaching its 200th anniversary. 

On account of these and similar facts, our minds 
today fittingly travel back over more than 200 
years of the Religious and Political History of our 
people. Therefore, this spot, on this spot, on which 
stands today this old Church building with all its 
precious associations, deserves to be cherished as 
one of the very birth places of the American 
nation. 

Because of the events that have taken place 
within that period of more than two centuries, 
which largely embraces the life of the English 
people in North America, and because we are in 
the midst of these ancient and material evidences 
of the Christian Faith of our forefathers, and of 
their desire to worship God, according to the 
Forms and Rites of their Mother Church, the 
Church of England, we, who enjoy the rich bless- 
ings of the heritage bequeathed by them, and of 
the example set by them, reverently and devoutly 
recognize the appropriateness and deep signifi- 
cance of the occasion. So today to this spot, and 
to this House of God, we come, fully realizing 
that in this place we are indeed standing on "Holy 
Ground". 

The action of the early settlers of North Caro- 
lina in erecting in this place "an altar unto the 
Lord" in order that they might regularly and 
worthily "call upon the Name of the Lord" is in 
accordance with the custom, and practiice of the 



November, 1930 



greatest religious leaders of all times. It is an 
expression of the deepest instincts of the human 
heart. 

In a very early period of history when Abram, 
who was to become the Father of the Faithful, 
and whose name was later changed to Abraham, 
had come out from Ur of the Chaldees and from 
Haran, and with Sarai, his wife, had passed into 
the land of Canaan, and had come upon the plain 
of Moreh, then the Lord appeared unto him and 
said "Unto thy seed will I give this land. And 
there Abram builded an altar unto the Lord, who 
appeared unto him." 

But Abram also removed from this place and 
pitched his tent "having Bethel on the West, and 
Hai on the East" and there also "he builded an 
altar and called upon the Name of the Lord". By 
this course of action, Abram performed an act of 
worship to his God, and consecrated to Him the 
land unto which he had come. 

Abraham, accepted by Christian people, as the 
Man of Perfect Faith and True Religion, set an 
example for all succeeding generations to follow. 

The history of Isaac, of Jacob, of Moses, Elijah 
and Solomon, and of many others, all show the 
same longing to render worship to God ; the samle 
trust and hope for Divine protection and mercy. 

The religious instinct is universal and eternal. 
Man is ever longing for God's favor. The grace 
and mercy and goodness of God is always man's 
refuge and joy. 

The Prophets, Psalmists and teachers of all 
ages give the same testimony. Moses said : "The 
Eternal God is thy refuge", David sang: "Blessed 
are they that dwell in thy house." "Blessed is 
the man whose strength is in Thee." 

That the early churchmen who settled this land 
of ours felt and expressed the same universal 
longing for God is clearly evident. Moved by the 
great religious desires that spring from the deep 
places of man's being, and from the depths of the 
human soul, they sought after God, that they 
might know Him and worship Him. Thus did 
they build this house, and here set up an altar 
that they might worship God and consecrate this 
great new land to His service and teach His Gos- 
pel to their children and their children's children. 
Not on account of some new fad of their own day 
or according to some invention or scheme of their 
age did the colonists seek to worship God ; but in 
accordance with the noblest teachings of our race 
and in expression of the deepest longings of hu- 
man heart, the Christian people of this colony 
gave tangible proof of their belief in Almighty 
God, and of their reliance upon His protection and 
mercy. 

This building, which has stood for nearly two 



centuries, furnishes conclusive evidence that the 
founders of our Country would not and could not 
forget and forsake their Creator ; that they would 
not be false to their Catholic and Apostolic faith. 

In company with all the choice spirits of all the 
ages past, from the dawn of human history to 
their own time, with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob 
and all the inspired prophets of old, with the 
twelve apostles and with the disciples who follow- 
ed Jesus, with the early Church of Jerusalem, 
with the elect of God and with all the great com- 
pany of the faithful of all ages, these colonists 
sought to make true for themselves the words of 
the psalmist : "That God is our God ; He will be our 
Guide forever". 

As we think today of the planting of the 
Christian religion on American soil, of the influ- 
ence and work of the earnest Christians of Coloni- 
al times to make this a God-fearing nation, it 
seems right and fitting that the present genera- 
tion should hold the same conviction, saying, "Yes, 
Happy are the people who have the Lord for their 
God." It seems impossible, really, to contem- 
plate an American nation which is without faith 
in God, and without the blessed influence of the 
Christian religion. 

Thank God that this has never been completely 
the case and that our people have never entirely 
forgotten God. Thank God that the principles 
of His righteousness are imbedded in our Govern- 
ment. Thank God for the uplifting influence of 
those who have not been ashamed to confess 
Christ before men. 

Today we think of the men and women who 
labored and sacrificed for the erection of this anci- 
ent building, and of others who helped to lay the 
foundation for our Church in this State, of those 
pioneers of the Faith who blazed the way for the 
coming of Christ's religion. They had hardships 
to endure; they suffered the trials and inconveni- 
ences of a new country. While we value all the 
historic achievements of the past, most of all we 
treasure and esteem on the part of the early set- 
tlers of this country their faithfulness to the re- 
ligion of Jesus Christ; their devotion and their 
courage and their sacrifices for the Kingdom of 
God — Their full duty they performed ; their cross, 
they unfalteringly bore. 

"They climbed the steep ascent of 
Heaven 
Through peril, toil and pain, 
O, God, to us may grace be given 
To follow in their train". 

What has been achieved by our forefathers we 
must preserve — what has been bequeathed to us, 

(Continued on page nine) 



The Mission Herald 




ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription £1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. 

% % % 

THANKSGIVING 

It is well to remember that Thanks- 
giving Day does not necessarily mean 
- a big dinner for ourselves, but a 
thanksgiving to God for our abundant blessings. 
Though these blessings may not be as abundant 
materially as during other years, yet no one with 
a memory can lack for abundant things for which 
to thank God. 

Again, Thanksgiving Day means expressing of 
thanks "not only with our lips" but in service to 
the children of the Thompson Orphanage. Shall 
we permit these children at the Orphanage to 
suffer because we may not have just the same 
amount of material prosperity we had in years 
gone by ? Think first of the children, then give. 



THE DUTY OF A VESTRY 

WHAT are the relations of the vestry to the 
congregation? What should a congrega- 
tion expect of a vestry? What should a vestry 
expect of a congregation? What are the duties 
of a vestryman? 

These most important questions are answered 
on page ?? in the article "What the Congregation 
May Expect of a Vestry", and in the following 
article. 

It would be well worth while for every rector of 
the Diocese to send a marked copy of these articles 
to each of his vestryment. 

Many a vestryman serves on a vestry without 
knowing what he is there for. Here, in the Mis- 
sion Hei*ald, he has the information in very con- 



cise form. Who will see that he gets this infor- 
mation ? 

These two articles are copied by permission of 
Morehouse Publishing Co., from "The Parish" by 
Rev. W. A. R. Goodwin, D. D. 

MISSIONARY INFORMATION 

ONE of our reasons for lack of enthusiasm for 
missions is lack of information regarding our 
missionaries: who they are, where they are and 
just what are they doing. Dr. Disosway is doing 
a great deal of good while on her furlough this 
year in bringing this information to us in such 
an attractive and gripping manner. 

Also in "News of Our Workers" we find helpful 
information in this line. 

THE CHRISTMAS BOX 

WHAT would your children think of you if 
you forgot that Christmas comes on Decem- 
ber 25th? The children of our missions will feel 
just as badly disappointed if we fail to get our 
Christmas boxes off in time to reach them by 
Christmas. 

* 

LAMBETH RESOLUTIONS 

BEGINNING in this issue we print the first part 
of the "Resolutions of the Lambeth Confer- 
ences, 1930." This division treats of "The Christ- 
ian Doctrine of God." This is not only interesting 
and instructive but helps to clear the atmosphere 
of uncertainty as to what our Church truly be- 
lieves and teaches, and tells us in the language 
of today. We have here authoritative teaching. 

WILL TO SERVE 

THE history of Mrs. Frances S. Norwood, given 
in "A Lay Missionary," is a wonderful tribute 
to a Christian who could labor for Jesus Christ 
and her people, never letting prejudice or any 
hindrance whatever overpower her will to serve. 

IN YE EDITOR'S MAIL BOX 

IN ye editor's mail box: sketches from "the re- 
diculous to the sublime." 

"Don't send me your sheet any more. I don't 
want it and never have !" 

"Cancel my subscription. It is neither honest 
nor fair to charge $1.00 for a year's subscription 
and publish your paper but eleven months of the 
year." 

"Enclosed find $1.00 for renewal. I value the 
Mission Herald very highly and read every single 
word of it every month." 

"Enclosed find $1.00 for renewal. I would not 
do without the Mission Herald for anything. I 
think it far better than the Southern Churchman." 



November, 1930 



ANNIVERSARY SERMON 

(Continued from page seven) 
must pass on to the succeeding generations. 
What men and women should declare today, as 
have the faithful souls who are departed out of 
this world, is that as God yearns for the love and 
obedience of His people, so, also, does mankind 
need God's protection and love and fellowship. 

The clear and steadfast declaration made by all 
who have toiled for the sake of others and have 
been loyal to their faith is that man cannot live 
without God and only in Him can everlasting life 
be found. 

The building of churches in the more important 
settlements of North Carolina in colonial days; 
the support of ministers of the Gospel who came 
out from England ; contributions made by gener- 
ous laymen, like Colonel Edward Moseley, of Cho- 
wan, appeals to the Church Societies of England; 
and the help furnished by the Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel, and other generous 
persons of the Mother Country; and further 
measures adopted for the establishment of Christ's 
Church on these shores, have been of far reaching 
value and importance to the cause of Christianity 
in North Carolina and in the United States. 

To restore and preserve this Church building, 
the oldest within the borders of this State, to 
treasure all the achievements of the Christian 
people of colonial days and to pass them on intact 
to posterity, would indeed, be a worthy and Chris- 
tian service — Ezra, Nehemiah and other devout 
Jews, coming back from the exile, eagerly under- 
took the task of restoring Jerusalem. They re- 
paired the walls of the city and restored the temple 
to its former glory. They sought to make the 
Temple of the Lord as glorious as in earlier times, 
and to do whatever was needed that Jerusalem, 
the city in which their noble Temple stood, should 
be a worthy place for it. They labored with zeal 
and enthusiasm until their work was accomplish- 
ed. Upon the findings of the Books of the Law, 
once again the people heard the reading of the 
Law — and for all this, there was great thanks- 
giving among the people of the City. 

St. Thomas' Church should be restored. The 
walls should be strengthened; the tower rebuilt 
as it was originally. In 1934, the 200th anniver- 
sary will occur. Before that date, all the work 
of restoration should be completed in order that 
such an occasion might be observed in an ap- 
propriate manner. 

But it may be said that the records of this Par- 
ish, especially of the early days, are incomplete, 
and that very little is known or can be learned of 
its formation and of those who lived and labored 
in this Parish of St. Thomas', Bath. 



But my reply is that this does not matter. We 
may not learn the names of the departed faithful 
or have records of their achievements, but we 
know their works; we have mute testimony of 
their heroism and their sacrifice; and their names, 
are they not all written in the "Lamb's Book of 
Life" ? So we need not fail in our tribute of love 
and respect. We can still keep grateful memory 
of those who laid the foundations whereon suc- 
ceeding generations are building. 

To this end, with feelings of gratitude and rev- 
erence for the Saints of the Colonial period, I sug- 
gest today that St. Thomas', Bath, for the Glory 
of God, and in the memory of all the known and 
unknown faithful Churchmen of this Parish and 
of the colonial Church in North Carolina, hereafter 
be designated and known as St. Thomas', the 
Church of the Unknown Colonist. 

In the World War, countless heroes served their 
country and died in unknown spots and now lie 
buried in unmarked graves that can never be lo- 
cated. The suggestion that these soldiers who 
went forth in their country's behalf and who made 
the supreme sacrifice, with nothing being known 
of their place and manner of death, be memorial- 
ized by a monument to be known as the "Tomb 
of the Unknown Soldier'" met with universal ap- 
proval. In many lands such memorials have been 
erected by grateful people. In our own country, 
"The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier" has become 
a National Shrine. In majestic beauty on the 
heights of Arlington, overlooking the Nation's 
Capital, stands the white marble "Tomb of the 
Unknown Soldier" where sentries keep eternal 
vigil in behalf of a grateful nation. 

In keeping with this purpose of such honor to 
heroes of the past, St. Thomas' Church may, with 
fitting love and gratitude for the Heroes of the 
Faith, be called "The Church of the Unknown 
Colonist" and thus become a spot sacred to the 
heart of Christian America. 

EAST CAROLINA NEWS 
Wilmington, N. C. Two years ago, Cottage 
Prayer Services were started at Delgado Mill, 
near here, by Mr. Ashley T. St. Amand, of one of 
the local Parishes. Last year, the Mill owners 
provided a building and a Church School was or- 
ganized. Now regular church services are held 
each week by the lay readers, Mr. St. Amand and 
Mr. Oliver Carter, Jr. Since the first of this year 
the Rev. Alexander Miller, of St. Paul's Church, 
has baptized thirty-three for this Mission and the 
lay readers have presented fourteen to the Bishop 
for confirmation. 

Beaufort, N. C. The fall meeting of the Convo- 
cation of Wilmington was held in St. Paul's Parish, 



10 



The Mission Herald 



the Rev. Jean A. Vache, Rector, November 5th. 

The opening service was a celebration of the 
Holy Comjnunion by the Bishop, assisted by the 
Rector of the Parish. 

The business session for the clergy was held 
in the Rectory and was presided over by the Dean, 
the Rev. Alexander Miller, of Wilmington. The 
Woman's Auxiliary met in the Church and Mrs. 
S. P. Adams, Convocational President, presided. 
Joint sessions were held in the Church. 

Interesting addresses were made by the Bishop 
of the Diocese; the Executive Secretary; the 
President of the Woman's Auxiliary, Mrs. H. J. 
MacMillan ; the U. T. 0. Treasurer, Mrs. C. J. Saw- 
yer; Mrs. Outland, of the Department of Christi- 
an Social Service ; Mrs. Jennie M. Howard, Student 
Worker at East Carolina ; Mrs. Victor Shelburne, 
of the Convocation of Edenton; Miss Mae Wood 
Winslow, Educational Secretary; Miss Cornelia 
Van B. Harris, Secretary for Young People's Work 
and Dr. Lula Disosway, Missionary to China. 

The Rev. Alexander Miller was given a vote of 
thanks for his six years of faithful service as 
Dean of the Convocation. 

The Rev. E. W. Halleck of St. John's, Wilming- 
ton, was elected Dean for the next year and the 
Rev. Jean A. Vache, Secretary and Treasurer. 

| Woimae 9 § Aexiliary 

Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. Y 

t X 

X Publicity Chairman „t. 

NEWS OF OUR WORKERS 

IN the year's program for the Woman's Auxili- 
ary you will see that during November we are 
to have a program giving us information about our 
Women Missionaries, both those in the Field and 
those in Training. It has been impossible to get 
recent news of all of them but we want to give a 
few facts about as many as we can. 

Perhaps the one from East Carolina known to 
more of us is Miss Venetia Cox, of Winterville, who 
has been serving in China for some time. She 
has been in Hankow but in the summer of 1929 
she was moved to Wuchang across the Yangste, 
to take charge of the music in St. Hilda's boarding 
school for girls. She is delighted with her work 
there and says that St. Hilda's Compound is love- 
ly. Her girls choir gave a beautiful carol service 
last Christmas that all nationalities came to hear. 
Three fourths of the girls at St. Hilda's are Christ- 
ians and Miss Cox says it does one's heart good to 
see these loyal Christian girls go out from the 
school to take their place in China, making their 
lives count by their example of Christian living 
among their fellow people. Miss Cox would be 



glad to hear from friends in the Diocese and would 
be helped, no doubt, knowing that we were inter- 
ested in her and her work and remembering her 
in our Prayers. 

Recently Mrs. George H. Marshall, the daughter 
of the Rev. and Mrs. A. H. Marshall, of William- 
ston, has gone with her husband to Japan where 
they will serve on the faculty at St. Paul's Uni- 
versity, Tokyo. 

In our own Diocese at work is Miss Lona Weath- 
erly, of Creswell. She is doing fine constructive 
work as teacher in the day school at Galilee Mis- 
sion, Lake Phelps. The progress made by the 
boys and girls under her instruction has been 
most noticeable. Probably there are few church 
schools in the Diocese that have better attendance 
or more enthusiastic members than the one which 
meets on Sunday afternoons at Galilee Mission. 

Two daughters from East Carolina are now in 
training in Philadelphia. Miss Mae Bonner, of 
Aurora, who has been at the Deaconess School, 
but has now entered the Pennsylvania Hospital 
to begin her training as a nurse. She writes 
that she is very happy there, enjoys her work and 
feels very thankful for the help which the Auxil- 
iary has given her. 

Miss Maude Cutler, of Zion Parish, in Beaufort 
County, has this fall entered the Deaconess School 
in Philadelphia, having decided during the summer 
that she wished to go in training for the Mission 
Work of the Church. She is undecided as yet to 
just what kind of work she will do so she is taking 
a very broad course praying that she may find 
the field in which she can be of the greatest ser- 
vice. She writes that she is very busy with many 
studies and that later she will spend one after- 
noon each week in some form of Social Service 
work. She is happy there where she finds a real 
home life with a beautiful religious atmosphere 
and a spirit of friendliness and fellowship. 

One of the workers from East Carolina who has 
made a splendid record during her period of train- 
ing is Inez Middleton, who is a student at the Bish- 
op Tuttle School at St. Augustine's, Raleigh. This 
is her last year there and then she will be ready 
to do good work among her own people in the 
Diocese. 

We would like to bring you news of the others 
too, with whom we could not get in touch at this 
time. All of them, we are sure, are making their 
lives really count and your interest and prayers 
will give them strength and courage to go on and 
do even greater things for the Master. 

RENA HARDING WALKER, 

Chairman Committee on Recruit- 
ing and Enlisting. 



November, 1930 



11 



THE SERVICE PROGRAM OF THE 

CHURCH SCHOOL 
To Supervisors and Superintendents : 

/T TT ACHED to this lettter is the Christmas 
v_yi Box assignment for your Church School. 
I have tried to give you the work you pledged for 
on the cards. 

As a gesture of friendship and in order to re- 
lieve the minds of the Missionaries, I have written 
them, telling them that our Church Schools will 
take care of them this year. The names and ad- 
dresses are correct, and may I m-ge you to be sure 
to ship the Box on time. 

Again I wish to impress upon the Schools the 
fact that the GIFTS must be NEW. I am still 
hearing of Boxes filled with broken toys, being 
sent these Mission children, who really have noth- 
ing but what we send them. 

I wish to urge you to make use of the Mission 
Study Books of the fields assigned you. It is our 
desire to increase the Educational value of this 
work. Please make an effort to get "FINDINGS 
IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION", for articles on 
"THE CHRISTMAS BOX". Also any maps, books, 
pictures, leaflets, from the Book Store, 281 Fourth 
Avenue, New York. 

Let us resolve to send the best gifts we have 
ever sent this year and remember that only one 
gift (a joyful one) goes to each child. 

Hoping that you will have the happiest Christ- 
mas because of the real joy you receive from shar- 
ing with others, Believe me, 

Loyally yours, 
MARY GAITHER VonEBERSTEIN, 
Christmas Box Secretary, 

Washington, N. C. 
* * * 

CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 

Hertford, Nov. 8. — Upwards of a hundred dele- 
gates from the woman's auxiliary in the Episcopal 
Churches in the Convocation of Edenton gathered 
here in the Holy Trinity Church Friday for an 
all-day session. This included 34 organizations 
in a number of surrounding counties. 

The Holy Communion was celebrated at the 
morning service with the Rev. Stephen Gardner, 
of Washington, and Rev. E. T. Jillson, of Hertford 
as celebrants. Greetings were extended to the 
visiting women by Mrs. L. W. Anderson while Mrs. 
Harry Walker, of Creswell responded. Mrs. Victor 
Shelbourne, of Washington, rendered the convo- 
cation report as president. An auxiliary program 
was outlined by Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan, of 
Wilmington. 

Christian social service was discussed by Mrs. 
Fred Outland, of Washington. The importance 
of an auxiliary in every parish was pointed out 



in a speech by Mrs. S. P. Adams, of Wilmington, 
president of the Convocation of Wilmington. Noon 
day prayei's were said by the Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, 
of Greenville before he made his address. Student 
work was the theme which claimed the attention 
of the hearers of Mrs. Jennie M. Howard, of Green- 
ville, head of the department of student training 
at the East Carolina Teachers' College. 

Miss Mae Wood Winslow, of Hertford, spoke at 
length on the Church work in India. Miss Cor- 
nelia Harris, of Washington, superintendent of 
young people's work in the diocese of Eastern 
North Carolina made a report on her work. Miss 
Elizabeth Griffin, of New Bern, told the congre- 
gation of the progress of the supply work in the 
organization. Miss Lona Weatherly, of Cres- 
well, instructor in the Galilee Mission Station in 
Washington County, told of the work that she 
was doing under the auspices of the organization. 
Dr. Lula Disosway, a returned missionary from 
China, spoke of her work in the Orient. 

Mrs. C. J. Sawyer of Windsor, explained the 
work of the United Thank Offering. The closing 
prayer was said by Rev. Charles Williams, of 
Creswell. The following officers of the Convo- 
cation of Edenton were here yesterday: Rev. 
Stephen Gardner, of Washington, Dean; Rev. 
Charles E. Williams, of Creswell, Secretary and 
Treasurer; Mrs. Victor Shelbourne, of Washing- 
ton, President of the Woman's Auxiliary of the 
Convocation of Edenton; Mrs. F. B. Wayne, Sec- 
retary of the Woman's Auxiliary. 

Luncheon was served in the parish house by 
the members of the Woman's Auxiliary and the 
Saint Katherine's Guild, of Holy Trinity Episcopal 
Church. 

— The Daily Advance, Elizabeth City 
* * * 

To the Societies in the Convocation of Edenton: 

WITH colder weather comes renewed energy 
and interest in the work and especially in 
the work of this great Church of ours, as carried 
on through our Woman's Auxiliary, realizing as 
we do, the privilege it is to be enrolled amongst 
those who, by their charter, are endeavoring to 
spread Christ's Kingdom on earth. 

Summer reports show a gratifying number of 
societies holding meetings through the summer 
months and contributions to the Bureau of Sup- 
plies is evidence that they are not idle hours. Re- 
ports also show that most of the apportionments 
were paid in full by June 30th. Those who were 
unable to do this, will please send theiir checks 
as soon as possible to Mrs. A. H. Worth, Elizabeth 
City, N. C. 

For years our definite summer work has been 



12 



The Mission Herald 



assigned by the Bishop for objects he is especially 
interested in. You remember, at Convention in 
Wilmington, two objects were given, the Negro 
Hospital to be built at New Bern and the "Discre- 
tionary Fund" for Mrs. Howard, our Student 
Worker at Greenville. This summer work has 
grown to be a worth-while part of our program 
and is always for "Advance" work. 

I wish all of you could have been with me on 
Friday, October 11th, when I had the privilege of 
assisting in the "lighting of the hearth fire" in 
the new "Student Centre" in St. Paul's Parish 
House, Greenville. It was a beautiful ceremony 
and the splendid group of students present, mem- 
bers of the Episcopal Club, argued well for the 
future woman power of the Diocese. 

Mrs. Howard is busily at work "mothering" 
those girls and we must remember her in our 
contributions for summer work. It is our respon- 
sibility that she be provided with funds to make 
her work effective. She cannot work without 
tools. 

The program for your year's work is in your 
hands. You will find it most complete and very 
easily followed. I hope you will use it at your 
meetings. 

Let us all, as individual members of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary, support our parish officers and 
encourage them by good attendance and coopera- 
tion in their plans. The work cannot be success- 
ful or go forward, unless we, as individuals, realize 
the privilege it is to work together and with the 
Master to help make Him known to all people 
everywhere. 

MARY J. SHELBURNE. 

President Convocation of Edenton 
* ♦ * 

A LAY-MISSIONARY 

IN the Diocese of East Carolina there still sur- 
vive, though the number is still diminishing, 
a few colored people whose age and recollections 
cover the whole period of the Church's work 
among this group from Emancipation until now. 
Some of them have been known throughout the 
Church for their zeal and consecration in the 
work. To them as well as to interested and sym- 
pathetic Bishops, white Priests and devoted color- 
ed Priests is due recognition for lasting contribu- 
tions in establishing and carrying forward the 
evangelistic and educational activities of the 
Church among this people. Many of these color- 
ed workers were remarkable in many ways and 
did work of a unique character which would make 
an absorbing story, could it be compiled and would 
be a worthwhile addition to the missionary annals 
of the Church. 

Such a remarkable soul was the late Mrs. Fran- 



ces S. Norwood of St. Mark's Parish. Wilmington, 
N. C. She was born in Wilmington, June 5th, 
1846, and spent her whole life there in fruitful 
religious and educational activities of great help- 
fulness and was surely a prophetess not without 
honor among her own people as well as the whole 
community, white and colored. Her parents were 
James Drawborn Sampson and Frances Kellogg 
Sampson, his wife, free people of color. Mr. Samp- 
son received his name from the Sampsons of Samp- 
son County, the aristocratic stock from which the 
County derived its name. The Sampsons were 
prominent and well-to-do among the free people of 
color, the father being a preacher, and successful 
contractor and builder of his time. Deeply inter- 
ested in his people he established the first school 
for free colored children in Wilmington on the 
corner of 4th and Red Cross streets in 1857. He 
hired special tutor for Frances and the other child- 
ren of a large family. Frances absorbed all her 
tutor could give of arithmetic, history, geography 
and the contents of Webster's Blue Back Spelling 
Book so justly famed as the educational manual 
of her generation. But having an unquenchable 
thirst for more knowledge she read and re-read 
everything available, almanacs, newspapers, Pil- 
grim's Progress, her Bible through and through 
and old books her father had brought from Samp- 
son County. 

The educational work of Frances Norwood be- 
gan with the gathering of the children of her 
father's apprentices in the loft of his barn in a 
day when the teaching of the slaves was forbidden 
by law. The materials were chalk from her 
father's carpenter shop and smooth boards and 
blocks. So effectively did she do this secret work 
that when freedom was proclaimed it was a puzzle 
to all how these apprentices were able to read, 
write and figure so well. After the war these 
apprentices were known as intelligent and compe- 
tent builders. 

Frances found a ready field for the expression 
of her teaching ability in the school her father 
had founded in 1857 where she labored until her 
zeal led her to admit a few slave children which 
caused the authorities to close it. 

Later she was to have unforgettable experi- 
ences in the Spalding Settlement in Columbia 
County where the free Negroes needed a teacher 
for their children and having heard of the young 
woman who had done this work in Wilmington 
they engaged her. Here she became the first 
teacher of the little George H. White, who, in 
later years was a congressman from North Caro- 
lina. Here she taught little Arthur Moore who 
became Dr. A. M. Moore, the philanthropist and 
business leader of the N. C. Mutual group at Dur- 



November, 1930 

ham. Gathered around her in this school were 
the ancestors of the present outstanding Spalding 
family and others who are well known in North 
Carolina, New Jersey, Ohio and elsewhere. Ill- 
ness among her home folk in Wilmington ended 
this phase of her career after five years of in- 
fluential service. 

After the close of the war between the States, 
northern workers, who had come South to teach 
among the Freedmen, promoted the organization 
of a league to interest the colored people in the 
duty of educating their children. "Miss Fanny" 
as she was affectionately called by her people was 
made president of the League. In these meetings 
where she was assisted by her sister Susie, her 
rare eloquence in speaking was an inspiration to 
all. Schools sprang up all over the City. Com- 
petitive examinations were held to discover color- 
ed persons competent to teach as assistants to the 
workers. In these examinations she excelled and 
was appointed a teacher in Peabody School where 
she labored for several years eventually becoming 
principal. It was during these years that she 
knew and worked Avith such devoted and conse- 
crated white ladies from the North as Miss Hes- 
kith, Miss Sproat, Mrs. Twitcher and Mrs. Green- 
wald by whom she was greatly beloved. 

During the above mentioned period she was 
married to George H. Jackson, a man of letters, 
musically inclined, of good standing in the com- 
munity, a carpenter and in his lifetime a sheriff. 
Six children were born to them of whom two sur- 
vive. 

In the next period her educational and religious 
activities blend as she took an active part in the 
founding of St. Mark's Church and St. Barnabas' 
School, remembered as "The Old Red School" by 
those who recall with pride their first acquaintance 
there with Appletons Readers. In the year 1869, 
the Rev. Charles Otis Brady was brought by 
Bishop Atkinson from Boston, Mass. to take 
charge of the beginnings of St. Mark's Church. 
Before the building of the Church colored people 
had worshipped at St. Paul's, 4th and Orange 
Streets. Sunday School was held across the rail- 
road at 5th and Harnett. Here "Miss Fanny" 
joined in a great missionary work among the lowly 
with the aid of such consecrated souls as Mrs. 
Thelia Scott. Mrs. Polly King, widow of the late 
Rev. J. E. King of St. Michael's and All Angels. 
Charlotte, and many others who have passed on 
into the Great Beyond. The Norwood boys were 
often seen carrying a small rrielodian through the 
streets a distance of a mile or more that music- 
might be had for the services on Sunday after- 
noon. Here St. Barnabas' Day School was es- 
tablished and "Miss Fanny" took charge assisted 



13 

by Mr. Brady's daughters, Misses Eugenia, Alice 
and Elmira. It was strictly a Church School open- 
ing each morning with Morning Prayer and each 
afternoon recess with Evening Prayer; while Mr. 
Brady came on Fridays to catechise the children 
and hear the Creed, Prayers and the Collect for 
the following Sunday recited. 

Through the years the school experienced many 
trying vicissitudes but amid them all "Miss Fan- 
nie" stuck. After the death of Mr. Brady, the 
school was conducted by the Rev. Charles T. Coerr, 
white, for several years but again fell into the 
hands of Mrs. Norwood. Having become a widow, 
she married John G. Norwood, vestryman and 
later Senior Warden of St. Mark's Church. He 
was a successful contractor and a man of large 
family. 

In a day when schools were scarce and crowded 
St. Barnabas* Church School met a deeply felt 
need in the life of the community. But as other 
schools became more adequate St. Barnabas' dwin- 
dled in size though there were always people who 
would send their children to no one except "Miss 
Fanny" because of her beautiful Christian char- 
acter and religious teachings. Finally in 1918 
she gave up the work after a teaching career of 
67 years. It is said that Bishop Atkinson so high- 
ly estimated her religious character and teaching 
ability that he expressed a desire to offer her name 
as first principal of a school for colored youth 
about to be established in the 60's at Raleigh 
which has since grown to be our St. Augustine's 
College in that city. 

It was in the days of the Rev. Mr. Brady, more 
than 58 years ago, that her activities as a Church 
worker began. She was confirmed by Bishop At- 
kinson in the first class at St. Mark's. Not only 
as parochial school teacher as stated above, but 
as Sunday School worker and president of the 
first branch of the Woman's Auxiliary among 
colored people in the Diocese of North Carolina 
was she an ardent servant of the Master. More 
than 50 years she led in women's work. When 
the individual branches of the Colored Convoca- 
tion of East Carolina were combined for the first 
tirrte in a Convocational group by Bishop Strange 
at New Bern in 1909 she was chosen first Convo- 
cational President in special recognition not only 
of her ability but also of her long years of untiring 
service. Bishop Strange and the Rev. Mr. Suth- 
ern, then Rector of St. Mark's, Wilmington, es- 
corted her to the chair. In commemoration and 
appreciation of her 50 years of service in women's 
activities, the Woman's Auxiliary, assembled in 
annual meeting at St. Mark's Church, Wilmington, 
under the presidency of her successor, Mrs. R. I. 
Johnson, in July 1929. presented Mrs. Norwood 



14 



The Mission Herald 



with a gold chain. The years of Mrs. Norwood's 
presidency i n both Convocational and Parish 
branches were filled with devoted labors for Mis- 
sions, Thank Offerings, Special and Parish needs. 
She was never too busy to answer a call to labor 
for these causes which she so deeply loved. 

She led and labored during the episcopacies of 
four Bishops, the Rt. Reverends Atkinson, Wat- 
son, Strange and Darst, antedating by many years 
the organization of the Eastern Diocese. In her 
days at St. Mark's Church had as its ministers, 
the Rev. Messrs. Brady, Coerr, Faucette, Jackson, 
Bennett. Suthern, Parish, Griffith, Willett and 
Caution. Each would testify to her unfailing 
loyalty. She encouraged and mothered the young 
ministers; she was a staunch friend to the older 
ones. Her philosophy was, "Stand by him. If 
he is a good minister, stand by him trusting to 
keep him so; if he is a poor one, stand by him, 
trusting to make him better." 

After her 72nd year Mrs. Norwood visited the 
Rev. W. B. Suthern and family at St. Andrew's 
Church, Cleveland, Ohio, for whom she felt a 
motherly care. She visited the Church in Jamaica 
under the Rev. Wm. McKinney and St. Ambrose's, 
Raleigh, during the rectorates of the Rev. Messrs. 
Cochran and Fisher. Rectors and people together 
viewed her visits as a kind of spiritual pilgrimage 
and a spiritual benediction to the women workers 
in these places while all were subdued and 
strengthened by her quiet acts of worship and 
reverence for holy things. Her zeal, her undim- 
med eloquence under the weight of years inspired 
all who in each place were loathe to see her de- 
part. 

Her favorite passage in the Scriptures was St. 
Luke. 4th Chapter, 16th to 21st verses. These 
words caused her at times to desire to go as a 
missionary to distant lands and later in life to pre- 
pare for the work of a Deaconess. It pleased God 
that she should do neither; but that in the city 
where she was born she should spend all the years 
of a long and consecrated life in the service of 
her people who felt her healing touch and illum- 
inating presence both before and after emanci- 
pation. She walked and talked with them through 
84 happy and busy years, worshipping in beauti- 
ful reverence and giving of body, soul and spirit 
in untiring service. To God be praise for such as 
Fanny Norwood. As one who had wrought mighti- 
ly and well and whose work was done she passed 
peacefully on August 10th, 1930, lamented by 
thousands. 

"I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, 
Write, From henceforth blessed are the dead who 
die in the Lord ; even so saith the Spirit ; for they 
rest their labors and their works do follow them." 



RESOLUTIONS OF THE LAMBETH 

CONFERENCE, 1930 



I, 
The Christian Doctrine of God 

WE believe that the Christian Church is the reposi- 
tory and trustee of a Revelation of God, given 
by Himself, which all members of the Church are 
bound to transmit to others, and that every member of the 
Church both clerical and lay, is called to be a channel 
through which the Divine Life flows for the quickening 
of all mankind. 

1. We believe that, in view of the enlarged knowledge 
gained in modern times of God's ordering of the world 
and the clearer apprehension of the creative process by 
which He prepared the way for the coming of Jesus 
Christ, there is urgent need in the face of many erroneous 
conceptions for a fresh presentation of the Ghristian doct- 
rine of God and commend the Report of our Committee 
to the Church in the hope that it may help towards meet- 
ing this need. 

2. We affirm the supreme and unshaken authority of 
the Holy Scriptures as presenting the truth concerning 
God and the spiritual life in its historical setting and in 
its progressive revelation, both throughout the Old Testa- 
ment and in the New. It is no part of the purpose of 
the Scriptures to give information on these themes which 
are the proper subject matter of scientific enquiry, nor is 
the Bible a collection of separate oracles, each containing 
a final declaration of truth. The doctrine of God is the 
centre of its teaching, set forth in its books "by divers 
portions and in divers manners." As Jesus Christ is the 
Crown, so also is He the criterion of all revelation. We 
would impress upon Christian people the necessity of 
banishing from their minds ideas concerning the char- 
acter of God which are inconsistent with the character of 
Jesus Christ. We believe that the work of our Lord Jesus 
Christ is continued by the Holy Spirit, Who not only 
interprets Him to the Apostles, but has in every generation 
been the source of truth and the guide of those who 
seek it. 

2a. We recognize in the modern discoveries of science 
— whereby the boundaries of knowledge are extended, the 
needs of men are satisfied and their sufferings alleviated 
— veritable gifts of God, to be used with thankfulness to 
Him, and with that sense of responsibility which such 
thankfulness must create. 

3. The Revelation of Christ was presented to the world 
under the forms of Jewish life and thought. It has found 
fuller expression, not without some admixture of mis- 
understanding, through the thought of Greece and Rome, 
and the sentiment of the Teutonic and Slavonic races. 
We anticipate that when this same revelation possesses 
the minds of the Asiatic and African races, these nations 
will still further enrich the Church of Christ by character- 
istic statements of the permanent Gospel, and by char- 
actristic examples of Christian virture and types of 
Christian worship. 

We welcome such unfolding of the truth of the Gospel 
as one of the ways by which the nations may bring their 
riches into the service of Christ and His Church. 

4. For the reason set forth in Resolutions 1 and 2, 
there is need for the Church to renew and redirect its 
teaching office: — 

(a) By a fresh insistence upon the duty of thinking 
and learning as essential elements in the Christian 
life: 



November, 1930 



15 



(b) By recalling the clergy to one of their primary 
functions, namely, that of teacher, and, with a view 
to this function as well as for their own spiritual 
growth, by encouraging among them individual and 

• corporate study and prayer on subjects bearing direct- 
ly on the self-revelation of God in Jesus Christ, and 
the manifestations of His Presence in the modern 
world : 

(c) By the provision of similar opportunities for 
the laity; and 

(d) By a new emphasis upon the appeal to the mind 
as well as the heart in the preaching of the Word 
as an element in Christian worship. 

5. We welcome an increased readiness in many edu- 
cational quarters to accept the influence and assistance 
of the Church in its teaching capacity, and we urge that 
every effort should be made throughout the Church to 
seek more such opportunities and to use them with sympa- 
thy and discretion. 

6. Believing as we do that it is through the devotional 



life that men have advanced in their knowledge of God's 
nature and may hope to penetrate further into His mys- 
teries, we urge upon the Church the absolute obligation 
of Corporate worship; and we believe that a fuller study 
of the Christian Doctrine of God will both strengthen 
this obligation in the Church and also comment it to the 
world. 

S]€ Sfi 5jC 

Someone sent a doll to an English medical mis- 
sion in South Africa, back in 1911 or 1912. The 
doll was given to a sick African boy in the hos- 
pital. That boy is now head man of his tribe, 
and not long ago he appeared at the mission, of- 
fering to provide a much needed dispensary build- 
ing, in return for the kindness received years ago. 
So they are calling the new building the Doll's 
House. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Statement of Amounts Paid on Apportion ments for the Church's Program — Diocesan 

and General to November 1st, 1930 



Location 



Parish 



Apportionment 



PARISHES 

Atkinson, St. Thomas' % 100. 

Ayden, St. James' - 320 

Aurora, Koly Cross _. .. 500 

Bath. St. Thomas' 100 

Beaufort,. St. Paul's 600 

Belhaven, St. James' .. . 500 

Bonnerton, St. John's ..— 100 

Chocowinity. Trinity 100 

Clinton, St. Paul's 400. 

Creswell. St. David's 700 

Edenton, St. Paul's 2,500. 

Elizabeth City, Christ Church ... 2,000. 

Farmville, Emmanuel 400. 

Fayetteville, St. John's ._:.-. 3,300, 

Fayetteville. St. Joseph's 200 

Gatesville, St. Mary's 200 

Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 1,200. 

Greenville. St. Paul's _ 1.500. 

Grifton, St. John's 250 

Hamilton. St. Martin's 100 

Hertford. Holy Trinity ......... 1,000 

Hope Mills. Christ Church 150 

Jessama, Zion - ~. 125. 

Kinston. St. Mary's _. .._ 1,800. 

Lake Landing, St. George's 125 

New Bern. Christ Church :. 3.000 



New Bern. St. Cyprian's 400 

Plymouth, Grace Church 400 

Red Spring's, St. Stephen's ... ... 100. 

Roper, St. Luke's 350. 

Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' 240. 

Southport, St. Philip's 250. 

Vanceboro. St. Paul's 50. 

Washington, St. Peter's 3.500. 

Williamston, Advent . 300 

Wilmington. Good Shepherd 300 

Wilmington. St. James' 13.380 

Wilmington St. John's 3,000 

Wilmingtoi, St. Mark'B 200 

Wilmington, St. Paul's 2,000. 

Windsor, St Thomas' ..... 600 

Winton, St. John's 200 

Woodville, Grace Church 600 



00 
.00 
.00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
.00 
00 
.00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
00 
00 
00 
.00 
00 
00 
.00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.06 
00 
.00 
00 
00 



Paid by 
Parishes & 
3h. Schools 

$ 16.91 

54.35 

106.00 

34.50 

266.80 

290.44 

67.35 

13.65 

36.07 

211.07 

1,617.30 

1.166.67 

15.00 

1,666.45 

51.06 

69.20 

300.00 

925.00 

9.63 

50.00 

175.00 

22.00 

72.56 

375.00 

119.73 

647.25 

319.91 

125.00 

42.00 

206.03 

93.70 

7.50 

1.711.12 

25.07 

353.86 

10.098.94 

2,251.59 

197.75 

842.70 

101.10 



Due 
Nov. 



to 

1st 



Belhaven. St. Mary's 
BurgMw, St. Mary's 



ORGANIZED MISSIONS 

105.00 

... 100.00 



67.13 



14.00 
61.75 



66.44 
212.35 
310.70 

48.85 
233.20 
126.26 

16.00 

69.70 
297.28 
372.28 
466.05 
499.98 
317.35 
1,083.55 
115.64 

97.50 
700.00 
325.00 
198.72 

33.35 
658.35 
103.00 

31.64 
1,125.00 

1.852.75 

13.44 

208.35 

41.35 

85.67 

200.00 

114.65 

34.20 

1,205.53 

224.93 



1.051.06 
248.41 

823.95 
398.90 
166.70 
349.57 



73.50 
21.60 



Columbia, St. Andrew's 


306.00 

160.00 
25.00 
20.00 
60.00 

100.00 
50.00 

100.00 
25.00 
70.00 
50.00 
10.00 
60.00 


50.00 

117.50 

11.32 

20.00 

. 25.00 


200.00 


Edenton, St. John-Evangelist 


7.50 


Elizabeth City, St. Philips' 

Fairfield, All Saint's 


9.53 


Faison, St. Gabriel's 


16.70 


Goldsboro, St. Andrew's .._•. 


83.35 




35.00 
93.07 


6 70 


Lumberton, Trinity 

Maxton, St. Matthew's 


20.86 


M or ahead City, St. Andrew's 


82.42 
10.00 




North West, All Souls' 

Oriental, St. Thomas' 


41.70 


Pikeville. Mission 


41.70 


Roxobel, St. Mark's . 

Sladesvllle. St. John's 


125.00 
30.00 

200.00 
76.00 


93.75 

30.00 

100.00 


10.45 


Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's 


66.70 
62.50 




60.00 
126.00 
40.00 


7.00 
125.00 


43 00 


Trenton, Grace Church 




Warsaw, Calvary 


33.35 


Washington, St. Paul's 

Whiteville, Grace Church „ 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's 

Yeatesville, St. Matthew's 


160.00 
90.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 

JED MISSIONS 

60.00 


50.00 
10.50 
166.00 
51.01 
56.85 


75.00 
64.50 
.70 
32.34 
26 50 


UNORGANIS 
Aurora, St. Jude's 


41.70 




100.00 
40.00 
50.00 
66.00 
60.00 
60.00 
48.00 
26.00 


60.00 
19.00 
15.00 


23.35 
14 35 




Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 


26.70 
54.20 


Jasper, St. Thomas' 

Murfreesboro, St. Barnabas' 


23.53 
21.00 
22.49 


18.17 
20.70 

17.51 
20 85 


Robersonville, Mission ... 


Roper, St. Ann's . .. 


25.00 3.11 
30.00 19.65 
15.00 10.00 
20.00 10.00 

MISSIONS 

100.00 42.07 
50.00 50.00 
46.00 13.00 

$ 50,303.00 

onths .. $ 

rc-h Schools 


17 74 


Williamston. St. Ignatius' 
Wilmington, "Brooklyn'', Mission 
Wrightsville. St. Augustine'B 

PAROCHIAL 
Campbelton, St. Phillip's ., 


5.35 

2.50 
6.70 

41 28 


Kinston, Christ Church 




Tolar-Hart, Good Shepherd 

Total Apportionments — 1930 
Amount, due to November 1st — 10 ir 
Paid by Parishes. Missions and Chu 


24.50 

41,919.20 
26.342.41 



Balance due to October 1st $ 15.576.79 



16 



The Mission Herald 



t 



Virginia 
J Episcopal School 

| LYNCHBURG, VA. 

J 

jf Prepares boys at cost for Col- 
f lege and University. Modern 
X equipment. Healthy location in 
X the mountains of Virginia. Cost 
T moderate, made possible through 
<♦ generosity of founders. For cat- 
It alogue apply to 

| Rev. Win. G. Pendleton, 
£ D. D., Rector 

<5h:^.;^x~>:~x~x~:~:~x~:-x»»:-w-:~:-x~ 

Church Furnishings 

Gold. SiWer and Brass 



I 

I 
I 




Church and Chancel 
Furniture 

Write far Catalogue for 
Episcopal Churches. 

W. & E. Schmidt Co. 

.108 Third Street 
Milwaukee. Wisconsin 



THE 

Bank of Edenton 

SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 

Bank With Us By Mail 

JULIAN WOOD, President. 
W. O. ELLIOTT, Vice-President 
D. M. WARREN, Cashier. 



SAINT MARYS SCHOOL f 

1 AND JUNIOR COLLEGE f 

X Raleigh, North Carolina % 

X An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter receive her X 

v education in a church school. »|* 

$ Rev. Warren W. Way, A.M., D.D., Rector I 

.'. Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 years' college X 

v work all fully accredited by the Southen Association. Also -J« 

X Courses in Music, Art, Expression, Home Economics, and Business. X 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. Indoor ¥ 

X Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback Riding. % 

For Catalogue and View Book address ■> 

% A. W. Tucker, Business Manager % 

9 9 

A A 

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rRGEISSLER.INC.^ 

IJO SIXTH AVE. NEAR 10 "• ST. SEW TORK 

Ghurrh furnishings 

IN CARVED WOOD AND '13 23] 
AlARBLE BRASS SILVER.! 



FABRICS * WINDOWS ^] [, 



Y 

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Y 
Y 
T 
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x 

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Y 




X 
X 

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Cox Sons & Vming .% <mx~x^~x^>4~><~x~x~x~xk~xk~m~X"X~x~x~xkkk^xk^^^ 

I 



This Space For Sale 






CHURCH VESTMENTS 



Caaaacks, Surplice*. Stole* .j. 



Embroideries. Clerical Saita. 
Silk*. CUth*. Frineeu 

HATS. RABATS. COLLARS 



1X1-13.1 East 13rd Street 
New Yark 



^**V**«.*****»**»**»**»**«**«**»**»**»**«**»**«**«**«**»**«**»**»***,**» M ^**fc* # »**»* 



NORFOLK-SOUTHERN 

Passenger Schedules 
Effective December 29. 1929, via Norfolk 
Southern Railroad. Elizabeth City, N. C 
Lv. 12:15 P. M.- Raleigh, New Bern. Golds- 
bero, Beaufort and inter- 
mediate points. 

I.v. 10:25 P. M. — Raleish, New Bern, Golds- 
boro, Beaufort, Charlotte. 
B'ayetteville and intermed- 
iate points. Sleeper to Ra- 
leigh and New Bern. 

Lv. 5 :>0 A. M. — Norfolk a n d intermediate 
points. 

Lv. 2 :30 P. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Connections North 
and West. 
For further information, reservations, etc. 
apply to 

J. H. TUCKER. Ticket Aet 

Elisabeth City. if. <: 



Mi 



%k< 



is&xon 



^ersiib 



IS PRINTED BY THE 



I 
X 

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5 

: 

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| 

%*****»**»*%"«>**» # ^*V% # ^*V*» # *if # ^a.*** 1 ******^ 



.Fraeklie Priet Shop 



"Particular 



Colonial Avenue 



EINTEES 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 






Library U. of N. C. , 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Jan . * 29 





O 



v 



r\ 



O 



VOL. XLIV 






No. 12 







i 



issmn 




TLft-^ini-tl|at-^niPftl)-$aa-cainr-lRni.22:i7 



V 






December, 1930 




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The Mission Herald 



DECEMBER INDEX Page 

Legacies to Orphanage 1 2 

Christmas Message 3 

The Bishop's Letter 3 

Young People's Conference '4 

Whither Are We Drifting? 5 

Workers Wanted 6 

East Carolina Paragraph News 6 

St. Matthew's, Yeatesville 6 

Editorials $ 

Woman's Auxiliary — 

Convocation of Wilmington . 7 

Convocation of Edenton 7 

Department of Religious Education — 

Department Meets ._ 10 

Teacher Training . 10 

Church School Service Program 11 

Y. P. S. L. 11 

Colored Convocation : 11 

Committee on Publicity — 12 

Mrs. Boatwright Resigns 12 

Gleanings From Synod .._ 12 

In Memoriam — William Hardison Ward 13 

In Memoriam — Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Guilford 13 

Lambeth Resolutions — The Christian Community 14 

Financial Statement . 15 

* * * 

1930 LEGACIES TO ORPHANAGE 

THE Trustees of the Thompson Orphanage En- 
dowment and Building Fund announces that 
during the year 1930 they have received the fol- 
lowing legacies: 

From the estate of Mr. Nash Bunting, of Wil- 
mington, N C, the sum of $25.00, sent by Mrs. 
Jennie B. Wilder, at the request contained in the 
will of her brother, Mr. Nash Bunting; 

From the estate of Benjamin N. Duke, a legacy 
in the sum of $10,000.00; 

From the estate of James A. Hardison, Wades- 
boro, N. C, a legacy received from H. H. Hardison 
and others, Executors, $1,000.00. 

That in addition to the above legacies which 
have been received, the orphanage has been noti- 
fied of the following legacies: 

$1,000.00 from the estate of the late Rawlinson 
Myers, of Charlotte, N. C, who was a member of 
the Board of Managers and also a member of the 
Executive Committee, and who, as his father 
before him, Mr. John Springs Myers, late of Char- 
lotte, was a devoted and generous friend of the 
institution ; 

That in the will of the late Rev. Julian E. Ingle, 
of Raleigh, N. C, a bequest of $3,000.00 after the 
life estate of his widow, Mrs. Amanda P. Ingle. 
It happened that certain stocks were designated 
as a trust fund to constitute his legacy and others 
to other institutions but that the stocks had either 
been disposed of or had become worthless since 
the making of Mr. Ingle's will in 1926, but by the 
generous action of Mrs. Ingle, other securities 
have been placed in trust for her lifetime, after 



which the principal will be turned over to the 
Orphanage. 

FRANCIS CLARKSON, Trustee, 




t 

I 

X IF. IT IS WEATHERLY'S CANDY IT IS GOOD 

I W. H. WEATHERLY & COMPANY 

£ ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. 

♦!♦ 

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ELIZABETH CITY. N. C. 



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The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLIV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, DECEMBER, 1930 



No. 12 






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The Rt. Rev. James De Wolf Perry, D. D., Presiding Bishop of the 
Episcopal Church in the United States. 



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T men of good will" the 
tidings of great joy 
were given by the heralds 
of the Saviour's birth. To 
a world still yearning for 
the reign of peace and love 
the message comes afresh. 
There is a contagious faith in the Gospel of 
Christmas which many feel who watch by 
night for what they cannot tell, and who 
follow the Star whither they do not under- 
stand. For them at least on one day in the 
year the earth is filled with the splendor of 
God's glory. To them 1 send a message of 
greeting and good wishes. 

But there are those for whom the Christian 
life is the all important quest and the Person 
of Christ the supreme fact in human experi- 
ence. They make up the company who will 
be found in the conscious presence of their 
Lord on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. 



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The event of Bethlehem will have reality 
for them because it will have been born of 
hope and prayer and expectation. The mean- 
ing and the power and the peace of Christ- 
mas will be clear to those who see in it the 
fulfillment of God's plan and promise. They 
know that it happened because they share 
the age-long results of it. They know that 
Christmas is more than a reminder of a fact 
long past, for they find in it the sign and 
sacrament of a recurring gift. 

They have proved in their own lives that 
"In this world of sin where meek souls will 
receive Him still, the dear Christ enters in." 

They keep Christmas not only for them- 
selves but keep it in its purity and reality 
for coming generations. 

To all such I send greeting and a word of 
glad congratulation as to those who have in 
their possession the secret of happiness. 



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The Bishop's Letter 

IN my last letter I stated that I was leaving for 
Beaufort to attend the meeting of the Wil- 
mington Convocation. 

The meeting was held in St. Paul's Church, 
Beaufort, on Wednesday, November the fifth, and 
was most helpful and inspiring. 

On the night of the fifth, I preached and con- 
firmed ten persons, presented by the Rev. John 
B. Brown, in St. Paul's Church, Washington. 

On Thursday, the sixth, I celebrated Holy Com- 
munion in St. Thomas' Church, Bath, at 11:00 
A. M., and presided at the meeting of St. Thomas' 
Bath Association, at 12:30. 

I am sure that the readers of the Mission Herald 
enjoyed the splendid sermon preached by the Rev. 



Dr. Huske, and printed in the last issue. 

On Friday, the sixth, I formally took over the 
farm in Sampson County, recently left to the 
Diocese by the late Miss Sudie Hargrove. 

On Sunday, the ninth, I had the privilege of 
being with a fine group of laymen from all sections 
of the Diocese in Christ Church, New Bern. 

At 10 :45, 1 confirmed two persons, presented by 
the Rev. Guy H. Madara, and at 11:00 o'clock, I 
preached in Christ Church. 

After a bountiful lunch, served by the ladies of 
Christ Church, I attended and took part in the 
Laymen's Conference. Mr. George B. Elliott pre- 
sided at the Conference which proved to be one of 
the most helpful meetings ever held in the Dio- 
cese. 

On Monday, the tenth, my birthday, I left for 
Jackson. Mississippi, where I attended the meet- 



The Mission Herald 



ing of the Synod of the Province of Sewanee, on 
the twelfth and thirteenth. 

On Sunday, the sixteenth, I preached and cele- 
brated Holy Communion in St. James', Ayden, at 
11:00 A. M. In the afternoon I preached and 
confirmed fourteen persons, presented by the Rev. 
A. C. D. Noe, in St. John's Church, near Grifton. 

It is grateful to note that this splendid old 
Church is taking on new life under the leadership 
of Mr. Noe. 

On the night of the sixteenth, I preached in St. 
Luke's Church, Winterville. 

At noon, on the seventeenth, I attended a parish 
luncheon which was given mie by the members of 
St. Barnabas' Church, Snow Hill, and thoroughly 
enjoyed the delightful social hour with the splen- 
did people of that parish. 

At six o'clock that evening, I attended a parish 
supper given me by the members of Emmanuel 
Parish, Farmville, where I spent a most pleasant 
hour and was the grateful recipient of a delicious 
birthday cake. 

The Rev. F. D. Dean, M. D., who is in charge of 
the work in Snow Hill and Farmville, was present 
at the luncheon and supper and made happy and 
characteristic speeches on both occasions. 

On the night of the seventeenth, I preached and 
confirmed eight persons, presented by Dr. Dean, 
in Emmanuel Church, Farmville. 

On Tuesday, the eighteenth, I attended a meet- 
ing of the Department of Religious Education in 
St. Paul's Church, Greenville, in the morning and 
at night I preached and confirmed five persons, 
presented by the Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, and one 
person presented by the Rev. A. C. D. Noe, in St. 
Paul's Church, Greenville. 

On Friday evening, the twenty-first, I preached 
and confirmed two persons, presented by the Rev. 
Worth Wicker, in St. Matthew's Church, Yeates- 
ville. 

On Sunday, the twenty-third, at 11 :00 A. M., I 
preached and confirmed two persons, presented 
by the Rev. Worth Wicker, and celebrated Holy 
Communion in St. George's Church, Lake Landing. 

In the afternoon, I preached and confirmed two 
persons, presented by Mr. Wicker, in All Saints' 
Church, Fairfield. 

At night I preached and confirmed two persons, 
presented by Mr. Wicker, in Calvary Church, 
Swan Quarter. 

On the evening of the twenty-fourth, I preached 
in St. John's Church, Sladesville. 

On the evening of the twenty-fifth, I preached 
and confirmed five persons, presented by Mr. 
Wicker, in St. James' Church, Belhaven. 



On the twenty-sixth, I returned to Wilmington, 
where I spent a quiet and pleasant Thanksgiving 
Day with my family. 

On Sunday, the thirtieth, I celebrated Holy 
Communion (Annual Corporate Communion for 
men and boys) in Christ Church, Creswell, at 
8:00 A. M. At 11:00 A. M., I preached and con- 
firmed one person presented by the Rev. Charles 
E. Williams, in Christ Church, Creswell. 

In the afternoon I preached and confirmed six 
men, presented by Mr. Williams, in Galilee Mis- 
sion, Lake Phelps. At night I preached in St. 
Andrew's Church, Columbia. 

On Monday, December the first, I preached and 
confirmed two persons, presented by the Rev. A. 
H. Marshall, in St. Luke's Church, Roper. 

On Tuesday evening, the second, I preached and 
confirmed five persons, presented by Mr. Marshall, 
in Grace Church, Plymouth. 

You will have seen from the above that the 
month of November was a very busy one for me, 
but it was also a very happy time and one filled 
with encouragement. 

Our people, in spite of the depression, are de- 
monstrating their loyalty to the Church and their 
devotion to Christ in a very real way, and it makes 
me humbly proud to be the leader of such a people 
at such a time as this. 

With the earnest prayer that the Christmas 
message may bring a measure of our dear Lord's 
own peace to the hearts of our people, and that 
our homes may be filled with that joy which come 
to those who share their blessings with others. 

I am faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 
* * * 

Young, People's Conference 

THE Young People's Service League of the 
Diocese of East Carolina, held a Setting-up 
Conference in Greenville on Saturday, November 
22. An invitation had been sent to every Parish 
and Mission in the Diocese urging that one young 
person be sent as a delegate to this Conference. 
In spite of the fact that many were unable to 
send delegates there were thirty-five young people 
present. 

The meeting was opened with a devotional ser- 
vice by Rev. W. A. Lillycrop. Miss Harris then 
took charge of the meeting, briefly outlining to the 
delegates the purpose of the Conference — the re- 
organization of the Young People's Service League 
along Diocesan lines. 

The first business to come before the Conven- 



December, 1930 



tion was the election of Diocesan Officers for 
1930-31. A nominating Committee of three was 
appointed. This committee presented the name 
of a young person from each Convocation for each 
office and in addition there were nominations from 
the floor. After a short discussion the followiing 
young people were elected to serve as Diocesan 
Officers until the next Y. P. S. L. Convention. 

President, David Scott, St. James', Wilmington. 
1st Vice-President, Emily Shelburne, St. Peter's, 
Washington. 2nd Vice-President, Sarah Cook, 
Church of the Advent, Williamston. Secretary, 
Lalla Bragraw, St. Peter's, Washington. Treas- 
urer, Cecil Alligood, St. John's, Fayetteville. The 
President assumed the chair. 

There followed a discussion upon Diocesan or- 
ganization — whether the Diocese should be divid- 
ed up into Districts and if so, how many there 
should be and when these District meetings, last- 
ing one day, should be held. It was finally decided 
to leave the matter of District divisions to the 
Executive Committee, but the time of the meet- 
ings was set for the spring instead of the fall. The 
date of the Convention was then changed to the 
fall Of 1931. 

Other matters to be left in the hands of the 
Executive Committee were as follows : 

1. Diocesan Constitution to be drawn up by 
the Committee based upon Constitutions sent in 
by every League. 

2. A Standard of Efficiency. 

3. League Financial Objectives. 

(a) A Diocesan Budget made up of Dio- 
cesan dues paid in by each member 
of the League. 

(b) Contributions to Camp Leach. 

(c) The Bishop's Student Fund. 

(d) The Lenten Offering. 

After a delightful luncheon served by the 
young women of St. Paul's Parish, the young 
people re-assembled for a discussion of "Pro- 
grams". There was a feeling on the part of all 
present that prografl* material should be sent out 
from headquarters either monthly or quarterly. 
This, Miss Harris promised to undertake as soon 
as possible. 

Emily Shelburne then gave a delightful talk 
about Camp Leach and what it meant to the young 
people who attended camp there last summer. 
She urged that every League in the Diocese begin 
now to plan to send delegates to the Camp this 
coming summer. 

The Conference closed upon a high note by an 
inspiring and challenging address by Mr. Lilly- 
crop. 



ANNUAL CONVENTION 
The Annual Convention of the Diocese of East 
Carolina will meet (D. V.) in St. Paul's Church, 
Greenville, at 10:00 A. M., on Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 28th, 1931. 

* * * 

Whither Are We Drifting? 

Annie Quinn Guilford 

THE writer sometimes feels she must have liv- 
ed in the stone ages or some other remote 
period ; though in point of time, is is not so far in 
the background. 

As a child and in maturity, she attended ser- 
vice knowing she would have Morning Prayer, 
the Litany, (after prayer for President of United 
States) then the Ten Commandments; Collect, 
Gospel and Epistle for the day; hymns and ser- 
mon. She did not quail at the prospect. 

Now, in this age, which we will call the auto- 
mobile age, everything sacred must be curtailed 
to keep up the pace. 

When we go to Church in the city, the Rector 
begins with the Lord's Prayer, Commandments, 
Collect, Epistle and Gospel for the day, some 
hymns and sermon, collection and we are out. 

Service begins at 11:00 o'clock; lately we were 
on our way home when the clock struck twelve. 
Not quite one full hour given to God's service on 
this day. 

Has the work become so urksome that Morning 
Prayer must be eliminated, if the Ante Commun- 
ion is used ? This, of course, is proper when Holy 
Communion is to be administered especially, if 
there are many members. 

Some clergymen also recite the Commandments 
in its abbreviated form. 

Now what will the next or succeeding genera- 
tion have? How much more will be eliminated? 

Are we bored with religious services, or so fast 
in our living that we cannot stand giving up any 
of our precious time, which is either to be given 
to an auto ride or the golf course? 

Why does the Church put into our hands books 
for our study classes entitled, "A Church Awake" 
or "Beyond the City's Limit"? Why, oh why, 
when we haven't any time even to give Him on 
His Day? 

What we really need is a John and Charles 
Wesley to stop this generation in its mad career 
of speed in things divine. Until then our sing- 
ing "Faith of Our Father's" seems erratic. 



The Mission Herald 



Workers Wanted! 

The following are our present needs for work- 
ers on the foreign field. 

ALASKA 

Fort Yukon — Nurse. 

Nenana — Assistant Housemother. Teacher. 

Anvik — Assistant Housemother. 
CHINA 

Anking — Two or three women evangelistic 
workers. 

Hankow — St. Hilda's School: Music Teacher, 
Science Teacher. St. Lois' School : Music Teacher. 

Wuchang — General Church Hospital: 1 Nurse 
and 1 Doctor. Women evangelistic workers. 

Shanghai — St. Elizabeth's Hospital: 4 Nurses. 
(2 Supervisors, 1 for Social Service, 1 Theoretical 
Instructor). St. Luke's Hospital: 1 Nurse. St. 
Andrew's Hospital — Wusih : 1 Nurse. 10 women 
evangelistic workers. 

JAPAN 

Kyoto — 3 Women for evangelistic work. 1 As- 
sociate Doctor for St. Barnabas' Hospital, Osaka 
(man) . 

North Tokyo — 1 Doctor for St. Luke's Hospital, 
Tokyo, (man). 2 Women for evangelistic work- 
1 Nurse. St. Paul's University : English teacher, 
(man) ; Teacher of Romance Languages, (man). 
LATIN AMERICA 

Brazil — Southern Cross School: 3 teachers, 
(men). 

Porto Rico — San Juan : 1 parish worker. 

Cape Mount — 1 Nurse for St. Timothy's Hos- 
pital. 

Balomah — 1 Nurse; 1 Teacher, (woman), as- 
sistant principal for Fannie Schuyler School. 

Bromley — 1 Teacher, (woman), assistant prin- 
cipal for Julia C. Emery Hall. 

Cape Palmas — 1 Teacher, (woman), assistant 
principal for Brierly Memorial School- 

Monrovia — 1 Treasurer for the District, (man). 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 
Mountain Province — Sagada: 1 High School 
Teacher, (man) ; 2 evangelistic workers for work 
among the Igorots, (women). 

Manila — 1 Teacher for St. Stephen's School for 
Chinese, (woman) ; 4 Nurses for St. Luke's Hos- 
pital. 

Zamboanga — 1 Teacher for the Moro School for 
girls. 

For further particulars, address, 

THE REV. A. B. PARSON, 
281 Fourth Avenue, 

New York City. 



EAST CAROLINA PARAGRAPH NEWS 

The Rev. Guy H. Madara, Rector of Christ 
Church, New Bern, N. C-, has accepted a call to 
be City Missionary in Rochester, N. Y., and will 
begin his new duties on January 1st. 

* 

The Rev. Gustav H. Caution, who has been a 
clergyman in the Diocese of East Carolina for 
several years has tendered his resignation as Rec- 
tor of St. Mark's Church, Wilmington, N. C. 



ST. MATTHEW'S, YEATESVILLE 

Mrs. J. P. Bragg 

WE have services at St. Matthew's, third Sun- 
day mornings at 11:00 o'clock and fourth 
Sunday evenings at 7:30 o'clock. We also have 
a service each Wednesday evening at 7:30. 

Our Rector, Rev. Worth Wicker, of Belhaven, 
is wide awake, loyal to the needs of his people, 
and always brings us a well studied sermon — 
something worth while as well as entertaining. 

On the 21st of November, Rt. Rev. Thomas C. 
Darst was with us for the evening service, and 
confirmed two persons- Every one who reads this 
paper knows that our Bishop always brings us a 
joyful message. 

Our Auxiliary is very much alive if not so pros- 
perous. We meet every Wednesday afternoon 
at 3:00 o'clock, unless bad weather or other well 
known reasons prevent the meeting. We are send- 
ing our box this week. It seemed that our allot- 
ment had been mixed with a larger allotment as 
several of our members gave two dresses each 
to make up the required amount but "where there 
is a will there has aways been a way" and the 
Woman's Auxiliary of St. Matthew's can't be the 
first to break that rule. 

Our Church School is also living and will never 
be dead as long as Miss Clara Jackson can influence 
a few children to meet for the study of the Bible. 
What our school needs most of all is the attend- 
ance of more grown people. 

We appreciate having visitors come to our ser- 
vices. Our Church is almost on the state high- 
way, and distance means so little these days. 



EXACTLY! 

It's not what you'd do with a million, 
If riches should e'er be your lot, 
But what are you doing at present 
With the dollar and a quarter you've got ! 



December, 1930 



| Woman! 9 § 

X Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. % 
jC Publicity Chairman % 

CONVOCATION OF WILMINGTON 

THE Woman's Auxiliary of the Wilmington 
Convocation met in St. Paul's Church, Beau- 
fort, N. C, November 5th, 1930, at 10:30 A. M. 
Rev. Alex Miller, Dean of the Convocation opened 
the session with prayer. Then followed the ad- 
dress of welcome by Mrs. C. D. Norcom, of Beau- 
fort, and the response by Rev. Alex. Miller. The 
following Parishes were represented: Beaufort, 
St. Paul's; Elizabethtown ; Kinston, St. Mary's; 
Morehead City, St. Andrew's; New Bern, Christ 
Church ; Seven Springs, Holy Innocent's ; Wilming- 
ton, St. James; Wilmington, St. John's; Wilming- 
ton, Christ Chapel; and Wilmington, St. Paul's. 
President of the Convocation gave a most encour- 
aging report. Thirty-five societies, 33 auxiliaries 
and two guilds, all doing active work in the five 
fields of service. Mrs. Henry J. MacMillan ex- 
plained how an Auxiliary Program is formed and 
urged that all societies would follow the outline 
of the Woman's Auxiliary Program. Mrs. Fred 
Outland spoke on the Christian Social Service 
work, and said that Christian Social Service is 
just what its name implies, a service for others. 
Christian and sociable and friendly. The names 
presented for the Nominating Committee at this 
time were: Mrs. G. V. Cowper, of Kinston, and 
Mrs. G. F. Roberts, of New Bern. Both ladies 
accepted. The Bishop, at this time, after a most 
wonderful address, held noon-day prayers. Mrs. 
Jennie Howard gave a most inspiring talk about 
the Student Center in Greenville. The building 
is now completed and the girls meet there and 
discuss their problems and ambitions. The bene- 
fit derived from this building has already shown 
itself in the large attendance at Church and Bible 
classes by these girls. Mrs. Victor Shelburne, 
President of the Edenton Convocation, spoke of 
the importance of an Auxiliary in every Parish, 
and asked that we would all be loyal to our Aux- 
ilaries in attendance and in service rendered. 
Mrs. C- J. Sawyer, Custodian of the United Thank 
Offering, gave a report of the amount received in 
the past year and talked of the plans for the com- 
ing year. Rev. W. R. Noe, gave us a splendid 
address on the Church's Program. Miss Eliza- 
beth Griffin, Supply Work Secretary, could not be 
present but Mrs. Adams said that this work is 
now thoroughly organized and has increased in 
the past year. After this, a most delightful 
luncheon was served in the Rectory by the ladies 



of Beaufort. The afternoon session was opened 
with prayer by Rev. Alex. Miller, after which Miss 
Mae Wood Winslow, Religious Education Secre- 
tary, conducted a most interesting study class on 
India. Miss Cornelia VanB. Harris, our new 
Diocesan Worker, talked to us of the Young Peo- 
ple, their needs, desires, etc., particularly their 
need of us and our need of them. After this, Dr. 
Lula Disosway thrilled us all with her talk on Life 
in a Chinese Hospital. Miss Steva Dobson, of 
Kinston, graciously thanked the ladies of St. 
Paul's Parish for their hospitality. Rev. Alex. 
Miller announced, at this time, that he had re- 
signed as Dean of the Convocation and Rev. E. 
W. Halleck, of Wilmington, had been elected as 
the Dean. Mrs. Adams, on behalf of the women, 
expressed most grateful and heartfelt apprecia- 
tion to Mr. Miller for his six years of faithful and 
untiring service. After closing prayers by Mr. 
Miller, the meeting adjourned. 

* * * 

CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 
Holy Trinity, Hertford, N. C, November 7, 1930 

THE Convocation of Edenton began its morning 
session with Holy Communion at 10 A. M., 
the Rev. Stephen Gardner and the Rev. Edmund 
Jillson, Celebrants. At this service the Convoca- 
tional Fund was presented. 

Following the hymn, "O Master Let Me Walk 
With Thee", the Dean of the Convocation, the Rev. 
Stephen Gardner, had the opening prayer. 

Mrs. Louis Anderson, Holy Trinity, Hertford, 
extended the visitors a most cordial welcome, to 
which Mrs. Harry Walker, of Creswell, responded. 

Mrs. Victor Shelburne, President of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary in the Convocation of Edenton, 
called the meeting to order. The Secretary call- 
ed the roll and read the minutes of the 1929 meet- 
ing held in St. Luke's, Winterville. Eighteen 
places were represented as in 1929, but more or- 
ganizations were represented by delegates and the 
Church was filled with members of these organiz- 
ations. The Bishop could not be present and only 
four of the Clergy and fewer laymen made their 
appearance during the day. 

Mrs. Shelburne, although not able to report as 
she did in 1929, that all assessments were paid 
by June, stated that only $200 was lacking to 
complete this assessment, and felt rather encour- 
aged that three new Auxiliaries had been formed 
during the year, and that a greater number of 
organizations were meeting during the summer 
months. Mrs. Shelburne urged that each organiz- 
ation cooperate in the work of every department. 

Mrs. Shelburne reported that if it was agree- 
Continued on page nine 



The Mission Herald 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 

Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

ElizaBeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent pei word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. 

* * * 

CHRISTMAS PRESENTS 

THIS is the time for present giving, when our 
Heavenly Father gave His great gift to the 
world and which we found in a manger. What a 
lesson is here! How near like that will be our 
Christmas ? Will this sacred day mean nought bpt 
giving and receiving presents with our closest 
friends? Or will it be a day of profound grati- 
tude to God for His love for us expressed by such 
a gift at such a price. Will this Christmas mean 
a giving of ourselves to God, not only with our 
lips but in our lives? 

May this Christmas find the readers of this 
paper truly conscious of the ever present Lord, 
not theoretically or theologically, but through 
personal experience with Jesus in the inner life. 

# 

A FEW MORE DAYS 

IN a few short days 1930 will be a memory. Will 
1931 suddenly find your parish or mission with 
a balance still owing the diocese- 

The diocesan budget is naturally built on the 
foundation of parish quotas. If these parish quo- 
tas fail to be paid then the whole structure of the 
diocesan Church is bound to be effected. It means 
simply that, should a parish or parishes fail to 
pay their quota to the diocese, it makes it impos- 
sible for the diocese to meet some just obligation. 
This obligation may be the Bishop's salary, the 
salary of some missionary clergyman, the General 
Church Quota, and the like. The seriousness of 
the effect upon the diocesan Church work is in 
proportion to the amount of the quotas unpaid. 

The cry is heard — economize — retrench, especi- 
ally during these days of depression. But the ob- 
ligations of the diocese were set by the last dio- 



cesan convention and further retrenching or 
economizing must be done in 1931 through the 
diocesan convention meeting January 28th. 

Our problem now is 1930, to see that each and 
every parish and mission fully meets its obliga- 
tion to the diocese, which obligation they them- 
selves assumed at the last diocesan convention. 
In some cases perhaps this will be hard, but fail- 
ures to meet these obligations may be harder still 
in its effect upon the whole diocesan organization. 

* 

WHY GO TO CHURCH 

WHITHER are we drifting", written by the 
pew, should cause some of us to stop a bit 
and think. Is the service, the ritual of our Church 
becoming in itself the act of worship? Does it 
mean that it is like the temple ceremonies of old 
which when, perfectly rendered, was all expected 
of man, regardless the condition of his individual 
heart and mind? 

To those worshipping in the Church the ritual 
is a means whereby the hungering and yearning 
heart may go to God and find peace. To others 
it may be only a beautiful ceremony rendered by 
loyal Church members wholly unconscious of any 
vital connection between the individual and God. 

The ritual is a waste of time if it is not a 
medium through which the soul may speak to the 
Father and through which the Father may speak 
to and bless the individual soul. 

* 

GUESSING AND READING 

IT is generally agreed that no two people look 
just alike. Some are good looking and some 
are — well, not so good looking. Some are tall, 
some are low; some are slim and some are stout. 
This description also fits each individual's hand 
writing. Material that comes to the editor and 
which the editor turns over to the linotype oper- 
ator, has just as many individual characteristics. 
Some we print wholly by guess, some by experi- 
ence with that same writing, (The Bishop's), some 
by free translation, and some (glory be) by just 
reading. 

It is not the purpose of this sketch to stop the 
contributions coming to the editor — WE WANT 
FAR MORE OF IT, but to remind the writer that 
one or more persons, wholly unfamiliar with the 
individual's personal characteristics in hand writ- 
ing must do the reading — or guessing. 

When a typewriter cannot be had, be sure to. 
write plainly, for a stranger must do the reading 
before it can be set in type. And especially should 
all NAMES be written carefully, better still, to 
print them by hand. To do this makes guessing 
unnecessary and errors in printing will be reduced 
to the minimum. 



December, 1930 



CONVOCATION OF EDENTON 

Continued from page seven 

able the funds sent in during the summer for the 
colored hospital at New Bern would be diverted 
to the fund for the Student Center at Greenville. 
Mrs. Shelburne asked that the annual reports 
be sent in promptly so that her report could go 
in to Mrs. MacMillan before the Convention to be 
held in January, 1931. 

Mrs. Shelburne also reported that two girls had 
dedicated themselves to the work of the Church, 
Miss Bonner, of Aurora, training for a nurse, and 
Miss Maude Cutler, of Zion, training at the Dea- 
coness School in Philadelphia, the Woman's Aux- 
iliary helping both of these girls. 

Mrs. Shelburne stated that the main objectives 
of the Woman's Auxiliary are missions and church 
extension. She urged the women to give their 
individual support to this work, and asked that 
young women be enrolled in the Woman's Auxili- 
ary, possibly in a B branch. 

At this point Mrs. Shelburne announced that 
there was business to be taken up. She stated 
that there was in the treasury the sum of $103.18, 
Convocational Fund of 1929 turned over to the 
women by the Dean and Treasurer, and asked 
what disposition should be made of this fund. 
Out of this arose a great many questions as to 
the needs, and the following motions were made 
and carried: 

That the $103.18 should be used for the 
Discretionary Fund for the work at East 
Carolina Teachers College ; that hereafter the 
Convocational Fund would be administered at 
the time of presentation, the women having 
previously been notified of the needs for 
which it might be used- 

That the President of the Auxiliary in the 
Convocation of Edenton and a committee 
chosen by herself decide on the needs to be 
presented to the women for consideration and 
for which the fund is to be spent. 
The Dean and Treasurer were given a vote of 
thanks for this fund. 

Mrs. Melick, Chairman of the Nominating Com- 
mittee, presented the names of the persons to re- 
present the Convocation on the Nominating Com- 
mittee, as follows: Mrs. Sidney McMullan, of 
Edenton, and Mrs. June Grimes, of Washington. 
Both accepted. 

Following the business session Mrs. Henry J. 
McMillan addressed the women and expressed her 
regret at not having been able to attend the meet- 
ing of the Convocation in 1929, on account of be- 
ing abroad at that time. Mrs. McMillan then told 
of the foundation upon which the Diocesan Aux- 
iliary Program is made and asked cooperation in 



every branch of the work, urging the members 
to bear in mind the three-fold ministry of Christ, 
stressing personal service. Mrs. MacMillan stat- 
ed that people throughout the whole Church are 
looking to the Province of Sewanee for inspira- 
tion. 

The Rev. W. A. Lillycrop had noon day prayers 
for missions and made a very inspiring address 
reviewing briefly the address of Bishop Darst at 
the meeting of the Convocation of Wilmington 
held on the 5th of November at Beaufort. Mr. 
Lillycrop stated that the Bishop was especially 
pleased with the work at the Student's Center 
in Greenville, Camp Leach, and the work of Miss 
Harris among the Young People. 

Mr. Lillycrop, in his address said that the only 
power sufficient for our needs is the power of 
Jesus Christ. Also he said, we must go out and 
share ourselves with others and allow Christ to 
live again in us. Illustrating another thought 
with Gandhi of India, Mr. Lillycrop showed where 
Chrstianity could and does fail when people are 
Christians in name only. 

Mrs. Outland made a short but very inspiring 
talk on Christian Social Service, urging each one 
to do something for some one else, to pass on worth 
while things to others. And of every little thing 
done make a record. 

Mrs. S. P. Adams made a splendid talk on the 
importance of an Auxiliary in every parish, de- 
fining its purpose and stating that it makes us 
realize there is work to be done beyond our four 
walls because embodied in the work of the Aux- 
iliary are the Box Work, Study Classes, United 
Thank Offering, and above all high ideals and 
service, covering the three-fold purpose of the 
organization — Missionary, Educational, and Spir- 
itual. 

Mrs. Jennie Howard, Student Worker, gave one 
of the most interesting talks of the Convocational 
Meeting, her work at the Student Center, East 
Carolina Teachers College being particularly out- 
standing and vital. Mrs. Howard described the 
Student Center and then gave the spiritual ad- 
vantages of such a project. Mrs- Howard told 
of the service dedicating this room, with prayers 
said in the glow of the fire in the big chimney. 

Miss Mae Wood Winslow in her enthusiastic 
and interesting manner presented the material 
for study this fall and winter, urging every branch 
to study some book on India, preferably "India 
on The March." Other books suggested were: 
"India Looks to Her Future". "The Turn Toward 
Peace", "The Splendor of God", "Understanding 
India", and "Our Expanding Church." Miss 
Winslow incidentally stating that the Episcopal 
Church had no work in India. 



10 



The Mission Herald 



At one o'clock the meeting adjourned for the 
delightful luncheon prepared by the women of 
Holy Trinity. 

* 

The meeting re-convened in the Church at two 
o'clock. 

After the hymn, "Stand Up, Stand Up For 
Jesus", Mr. Jillson had prayers. 

Next on the program was Miss Cornelia Harris 
telling of the Young People's Work- Miss Harris 
stated that not only do we need the Young People 
but they need us. What they need most, she 
stated, is something they can live rather than 
something they can learn. Three aims for Young 
People were given, Growth in Effective Christian 
Living, Acceptance of His purpose for The Whole 
of Life, and United Service for The Advancement 
of The Kingdom of God. Miss Harris urged that 
all Young People be sent to Camp Leach. In ask- 
ing the cooperation of the men and women inter- 
ested in this work Miss Harris stated that no one 
need to attempt to be a leader of Young People 
who does not love and understand them. 

Miss Leona Weatherly told of the wonderful 
growth in the work at Galilee Mission, and ex- 
pressed her appreciation of the support given her 
by the women. She also thanked the women for 
the assistance which made it possible for her to 
study at St. Faith's House during the summer of 
1930. 

At this time a motion was made and carried 
that the Convocational Fund of 1930 be given for 
the work at Galilee Mission. 

Mrs. C. J. Sawyer's talk on the United Thank 
Offering was most inspirational and helpful. She 
told how the United Thank Offering had grown 
from a lone woman's vision to the wonderful Of- 
fering of the last General Convention of over a 
million dollars. 

As Miss Elizabeth Griffin was not present Mrs. 
P. T. Anthony presented the Box Work and urged 
that each branch try to take all of the assignments 
sent them for 1930. 

Last on the program and perhaps the most in- 
teresting feature of the meeting was the address 
of Dr. Lula Disosway, Medical Missionary, on fur- 
lough after serving for years at St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital, Shanghai, China. Dr. Disosway told of 
having been spared the ravages of a terrible dis- 
ease while a very young child and of her determin- 
ation then to go into the mission field, and in after 
years, like Livingstone, deciding to serve where 
there was greatest need, curing the sick bodies 
of heathen people. Dr. Disosway illustrated her 
talk with pictures, miniature figures in native 
dress, and articles of clothing worn by Chinese 
people. 



Mrs. Shelburne appointed to serve on the cour- 
tesy committee, Mrs. J. G. Staton, Chairman ; 
Mrs. David Bell, and Mrs. E. B. Ficklen. Their 
report reads as follows: 

"We, the women of the Convocation of 
Edenton, in meeting assembled, November 7, 
1930, wish to express our most profound thanks 
and deep appreciation to the Rector, Vestry, wo- 
men and good people of Holy Trinity, Hertford, 
for their gracious hospitality, cordial welcome and 
delicious luncheon. 

More than this, we wish to record our gratitude 
for the inspiring program which has been a chal- 
lenge for better work and we return to our homes 
with a resolution to dedicate, anew, ourselves to 
the service of our Master." 

The Rev. Charles Williams pronounced the bene- 
diction. 

MARY JAMES SHELBURNE, Pres. 
VELLA ANDREWS WYNNE, Sec'y. 
* * * 

♦., * * * * * * ............ 

£ Department of Religious Education \ 

MRS. REN A H. WALKER, Publicity Chairman % 

♦J> . .. , . ■ »J> 

THE Department of Religious Education held 
a meetng at St. Paul's, Greenville, on Nov- 
ember 18, Rev. W. A. Lilycrop, Vice-Director, 
called the meting to order. The following were 
present: Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Rev. 
Walter R. Noe, Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, Miss Cornelia 
Van B. Harris, Mrs. H. M. Bonner, Mrs. James G. 
Staton, Rev. Thomas H. Wright, Rev. J. W. Her- 
itage, D. D., Mrs. Harry Walker, Mrs. Jennie M. 
Howard, and Rev. I. DeL. Brayshaw. 

Bishop Darst opened the meeting wth prayer, 
then in an opening address spoke briefly on the 
Synod, telling how, of the $11,000.00 in the Bud- 
get, $8,000.00 is used by the Department of Re- 
ligious Education. 

Committees of the Department Report 
Teacher Training — Miss Cornelia Van B. Harris 

Miss Harris outlined briefly her visits to the 
Schools of the Diocese, and stated that in most 
of them there is a desire for teacher training. A 
motion was adopted that the Christian Nurture 
Series be recommended to the Church Schools 
of the Diocese as the standard which each school 
should endeavor to adopt. Miss Harris discussed 
the beginning of the teacher training by use of a 
Diocesan faculty. The following motion was a- 
dopted : 

"Looking forward to the time when we may 
have in every district of our Diocese an annual 
teacher training Institute, we hereby request Miss 
Harris to undertake as soon as possible such dis- 



December, 1930 



11 



trict teacher training meetings, having three in 
the early part of 1931, if possible, working out the 
details of such teacher training meetings with the 
Bishop, Executive Secretary and Vice-Chairman 
of the Department." 

Miss Harris stated that she hoped to begin a 
Diocesan Library of material for Church School 
teacher training. Mr. Brayshaw suggested that 
unused materials, literature, etc., be sent at the 
close of the year to Miss Harris for use by smaller 
schools. 

Church School Service Program 
Mrs. H. M. Bonner 

Mrs. Bonner suggested that we definitely adopt 
a Diocesan Church School Service Program be- 
cause of the fact that the Province Standard of 
Excellence requires that students be given train- 
ing in service. 

The Department then adopted a Diocesan 
Church School Service program carrying out the 
idea of different groups of different ages as plan- 
ned out in the charts prepared by Mrs. Bonner, 
working in the Five Fields of Service. To get 
this program under way, the discussion brought 
out that the following Diocesan Secretaries now 

I exist : 
The Little Helpers — Miss Ida Peacock, Roper, 
N. C. 

The Birthday Thank Offering— Mrs. W. R. Noe, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

The Box Work — Mrs. William vonEberstein, 
Washington, N. C. 

The Lenten Offering— Rev. W. R. Noe, Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

The Young People's Service League — Miss 
Cornelia Harris, Wilmington, N. C. 

Each of these Secretaries will henceforth re- 
port through Mrs. Bonner as Supervisor of the 
Diocesan Church School Service Program and in 
• each Parish and Mission there will be local Secre- 
taries promoting these activities in the Week Day 
Service Program. It was decided that Mrs. Bon- 
ner should be on the Diocesan Staff for Teacher 
Training in order to get this program under way 
throughout the Diocese. 

The Discussion of Adult Education was omit- 
ted as Miss Mae Wood Winslow was unable to 
be present. 

Mrs. James G. Staton was elected Chairman of 
the Committee on Work Ampng the Isolated. It 
was felt that one central person could best do this 
work and the Department is delighted to report 
that Mrs. Staton has agreed to undertake it. 
The Young People's Service League 
Miss Cornelia Harris 

Miss Harris stated that in her survey of the 
Diocese she found many splendid groups of young 



people but that many of them lacked programs of 
real value. There is also a tremendous need for 
more Counsellors and trained Counsellors and she 
urged that some be sent to Kanuga to prepare 
them for use in the entire Diocese and at Camp 
Leach. The Department approved of the Y. P. 
S. L. adopting certain definite objectives in the 
five fields and also approved of a District Organi- 
zation to be set up for the Leagues. It was fur- 
ther decided that a standard of requirements 
should be formed by which each League must 
measure up to a definite standard to be in good 
standing in the Diocesan League. Miss Harris 
announced the Conference for Young People to be 
held in Gi*eenville on November 22. 

College Work— Rev. Thomas H. Wright 

Mr. Wright urged that we take steps to keep 
more closely in touch with our college students. 
As a program for College Work in this Diocese he 
asked the Department to request each Parish and 
Mission in the Diocese to do three things: 1. In 
the schools where the name of the College Pastor 
is listed on page 177 of the Living Church Annual 
send to the Pastor a list of your students, giving 
him any useful information regarding the former 
activity, development, etc., of each student. 2. 
Send to the Rev. Thomas H. Wright, Box 561, 
Lumberton, N. C, a list of your students giving 
the name of the College that each is attending 
in order that he may follow up your letter to the 
College Pastor and also during the year visit each 
student personally in his or her College. 3. Ar- 
range to have two Services this year specifically 
for College men and women, one during Christmas 
holidays and the other during the Easter or Spring 
holidays. 

This program was adopted. Mr. Wright re- 
quested the Department to finance the sending of 
one student to the Conference on the Ministry to 
be held at the Seminary at Alexandria, Virginia. 
In conclusion, he asked that a course on "Christian 
Ethics for College Students" be given at Camp 
Leach. 

The Colored Convocation 
Rev. J. W. Herritage, D. D. 

There is a great need in the colored schools for 
standardized work. One reason the Christian 
Nurture Series has not been used is the fact of 
the expense. There are no Young People's Ser- 
vice Leagues. The Convocation desires to be given 
suggestions and materials with which they can 
go forward with the work. 

Camps and Conferences — Bishop Darst 

The Bishop announced that this Committee had 
met and had made the following elections : 

Director of Camps — The Bishop. 

Camp Chaplain — Rev. W. A. Lillycrop. 



12 



The Mission Herald 



Dean of Students — Miss Cornelia Harris. 

Business Manager — Rev. Stephen Gardner. 

Physician and Supervisor of Camp — Dr. Frank 
Dean. 

This report was adopted as was a motion mak- 
ing the Camp Executive Committee to be those 
above elected with the addition of three others, 
two of them being Rev. I. deL. Brayshaw and the 
Rev. W. R. Noe. 

Committee on Publicity 
Mrs. Harry Walker, Chairman 

The Department decided that each Committee 
Chairman should send in, in time for it to reach 
Mrs. Walker by the last day of the month, a re- 
port of the work of their Committee. From this 
material, an article is to be sent to the Mission 
Herald each month concerning the work of the 
Department. 

# * # 

MRS. BOATWRIGHT RESIGNS 

MRS. SWIFT MILLER BOATWRIGHT has 
found it necessary for her to resign as 
Secretary of the Woman's Auxiliary. Her resign- 
ation has been accepted with a great deal of re- 
gret. 

* * * 

GLEANINGS FROM SYNOD and PROVINCIAL 
MEETING 

Mrs. C. J. Sawyer 

JACKSON, in Mississippi, is a far cry from 
Eastern North Carolina, in reality a journey 
of two days and nights from Windsor. Being the 
state capitol and having 50,000 population, Jack- 
son boasts many lovely homes, fine hotels, sky- 
scrapers and the handsomest State House you 
ever saw. 

St. Andrew's Church and parish house, in which 
the meetings of the Provincial Synod and Wo- 
man's Auxiliary were held, November 11, 12, and 
13, are complete and beautiful, especially the 
Church's interior. 

Hospitality begun the minute delegates arrived, 
and the assignment of homes was quickly and 
graciously concluded- As East Carolina's two 
delegates from the Woman's Auxiliary, Mrs. 
Henry Jay MacMillan, our Diocesan President, 
and I were entertained at Jackson's newest and 
most complete hotel, the Robert E. Lee, sharing 
a delightful corner room that was equipped with 
every possible comfort, including a radio. 

Our first service was at 4 :30 on the afternoon 
of November 11th, a joint Devotional Service 
led by Bishop Bratton, of Mississippi, who lives 
in Jackson. Seven-thirty again saw us in the 
Church at the formal opening service, when greet- 
ings and welcomes were extended by the Bishop 
of Mississippi, to which the Bishop of Atlanta, 



President of the Synod, the Rt. Rev. H. J. Mikell, 
D. D., responded. Following these preliminaries, 
the vast congregation listened with rapt attention 
to an address by Bishop Burleson, Asseessor to 
the Presiding Bishop, who, with marvelous sim- 
plicity and deep spirtuality, struck a joyous key- 
note of loyalty and devotion that thrilled every 
hearer. 

Wednesday, November 12th, at 9 :30 A. M., after 
registration in the parish house, the Provincial 
Auxiliary Meeting was formally opened with Mrs. 
Jas. R. Cain, President, in the Chair, and I wish 
here and now, to pay tribute to her as a perfect 
presiding officer as well as having every other 
qualification for the high and responsible office 
of Provincial President of the Woman's Auxiliary. 
We had several joint sessions with the Synod in 
the Church proper, at one of which Mrs. Cain 
presided. This fact, and the joining together of 
the Synod and Auxiliary in a lovely dinner on the 
last night of our stay in Jackson makes interest- 
ing history. 

Before giving a review of Mrs. Cain's Annual 
Report, which was made in the Church at a joint 
session, I must mention the charming reception 
to visitors and delegates given by Bishop and 
Mrs. Bratton at their home on the first evening, 
after service, when three hundred were present. 
Our President's Annual Report showed that in 
12 out of 15 Dioceses of the Province the woman's 
work is organized according to the Departmental 
plan of the National Council, this plan extending 
to the parish branches, "thus offering a channel 
through which every phase of the Church's Mis- 
sion may be intelligently studied and aided." 

In 14 out of 15, an effort is being made to unify 
the work of the women in the parishes under 
one organization, which will further the Program 
of the Church in the five fields of service, through 
prayer, work and gifts. We no longer think of 
ourselves as a little separate group, carrying out 
our own little program, but as a vital force in 
the Church's life, with no program but the Pro- 
gram of the Church, committed to further "every 
phase of the Church's Mission, in our homes, in 
our parishes, in our communities, in our Dioceses, 
in the Nation and in the World." We are not 
studying places, but problems, seeking to solve 
them for the good of mankind and the glory of 
God, through united effort, at home and to the 
ends of the earth. 

Under the Church's leadership, in this Province, 
the Auxiliary's objective has changed from Mis- 
sions to A MISSION, realizing that the Church's 
task is not merely to preach Christ's teachings, 
"but to make them a way of life throughout the 
world." 



December, 1930 



13 



We are realizing the need for summer confer- 
ences and training centers, not only for leaders 
but for individuals, in gaining help and inspiration 
for better Christian living. Here Mrs. Cain paid 
tribute to our two training centers in this Pro- 
vince, Sewanee and Kanuga. I trust, some day, 
it will be found expedient to add Camp Leach to 
the list. 

Mrs. Cain, speaking for the Auxiliary, respect- 
fully urged the Synod to more adequately support 
the program of the Department of Religious Edu- 
cation as being invaluable in training for Christi- 
an leadership; also, the Auxiliary begged that a 
stronger program in the Departments of Missions 
and Christian Social Service be developed. 

Mrs. Cain recalled the fact that the Auxiliary 
in the Province of Sewanee, no longer thinking of 
itself as a separate group with a separate pro- 
gram, laid aside its Corporate Gift to join in with 
the whole Church in carrying forward its Advance 
Work as suggested by the National Council, and 
we, as a Province, are committed to carry our 
part through to success. The Auxiliary has never 
yet failed, and has offered itself, anew, with eager- 
ness, to the use of the Bishops, the Clergy and the 
laymen of the Province of Sewanee. 

Our own Provincial member of the National 
Executive Board of the Woman's Auxiliary, Mrs- 
Wheeler, of Nashville, Tennesee, has had the hon- 
or of being made Secretary to the Board. 

It is a real pleasure to me to tell the women of 
East Carolina what a fine impression Mrs. Mac- 
Millan made on the Auxiliary women assembled 
in Jackson. Her advice and opinion were in de- 
mand, attested to by the fact that she was put on 
sevei^al of the most important committees, being 
made chairman of the committee on Advance 
Work. 

Next year being a Triennial Convention year, 
there will be no meeting of the Synod and Pro- 
vincial Auxiliary, but in 1932, the meeting will 
be held at Kanuga, which place was chosen over 
a very cordial invitation to meet in Louisville, Ky. 
Those of us who have not already done so are 
anxious to visit Kanuga, and North Carolina wo- 
men should take advantage of having a Provincial 
Meeting right here in our midst and go in a body. 

Before closing I simply must mention the im- 
portance that is being laid on our Student Work- 
ers throughout the entire Church, and the valu- 
able aid they are rendering in keeping college girls 
and boys in touch with the Church, and the Church 
with them. 

Our work among the blind and deaf-mutes was 
thrillingly told in a joint session of the Auxiliary 
and Synod, as was the Girls' Friendly. Miss 
Grace Lindley and Mrs. Loring Clark contributed 



much in holding the noonday prayer services, and 
both were a benediction to our meeting. 

Jin 0itmovtntn 

We, the members of Grace Church, Plymouth, 
North Carolina, deeply conscious of the Wisdom 
and loving Fatherhood of God, Who, in His Wise 
Province, took out of this world the soul of our 
Brother, Doctor William Hardison Ward, who, 
for many years was a most devoted Communicant 
of this Church and Senior Warden of the Vestry. 

Resolved, that the death of Doctor Ward will 
bring grief and sadness to the members of this 
Church and to the whole community who have 
known and loved him during his long and useful 
lifetime, every one of whom was glad of the 
privilege which was given us to know and love 
him as a devoted and trusted friend. 

We shall always remember him with pride and 
remember what he was to the Church and what 
he did for the Church, and the distinguished po- 
sition which he so justly held both in the Church 
and in the community, and we shall always cherish 
the memory of his saintly life, his wisdom and 
zeal ,his courage, and the sterling qualities of his 
spiritual and mental attainments, and will think 
of him for the charm of his manner, his kindness 
and consideration, and thank God that such a 
Christian Gentleman lived and loved and worked 
with and amongst us, and we 

Resolve to dedicate ourselves anew to the 
Church which he loved' and which during his en- 
tire lifetime was the object of his devotion and 
care, and we farther resolve that these minutes 
and resolutions be printed in the Parish Register 
and that a copy be sent to his brother Mr. John- 
ston Ward and to the other members of his family 
and to the local and Church papers and to the 
Bishop of the Diocese. 
Signed : 
A. L. ALEXANDER, Sr. Warden 
R. A. WILLIFORD, Jr. Warden 
W. R. HAMPTON L. S. LANDING 

H. A. WILLIFORD L. HORTON 

L. GILBERT J. LEGGETT 

C. AYERS W. EBNER. 

Aurora, N. C. 
Death of Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Guilford 

On the 30th day of October 1930, the Death 
Angel entered the home and removed from our 
midst our beloved friend and co-worker, Mrs. M. 
E. Guilford, and on the 16th of November He en- 
tered again and took the husband and father, M. 
E. Guilford. He had been sick for some time but 
Mrs. Guilford for only a few days. She had been 



14 



The Mission Herald 



so faithful to her husband during his prolonged 
illness, so loyal to her home and children, and her 
Church. 

Mr. Guilford was Superintendent of the Sunday 
School for eighteen years, missing only three 
Sundays during that time. They leave two child- 
ren, Helen and Raymond and two grand-children, 
children. 

The funeral was conducted from the Church 
of the Holy Cross, by Rev. Sidney Matthews and 
Mr. W. G. Lowe. The interment was in the Guil- 
ford grave-yard. 

Masses of exquisitely beautiful flowers in lovely 
and appropriate designs attested to the wide es- 
teem and genuine affection in which they were 
held. 

"Father, in Thy gracious keeping, 
Love we now Thy servants sleeping." 

LAMBETH RESOLUTIONS 

(Continued from last month) 

THE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY 

Marriage and Sex 

(1) The Conference believes that the conditions of 
modern life call for fresh statement from the Christian 
Church on the subject of sex. It declares that the func- 
tions of sex as a God-given factor in human life are 
essentially noble and creative. Man's responsibility in 
regard to their right use needs the greater emphasis in 
view of widespread laxity of thought and conduct in all 
these matters. 

(2) The Conference believe that in the exalted 
view of marriage taught by Our Lord is to be found the 
solution of the problems with which we are faced. His 
teaching is reinforced by certain elements which have been 
found a new emphasis in modern life, particularly the 
sacredness of personality, the more equal partnership of 
men and women, and the biological importance of 
monogamy. 

(3) The Conference believe that it is with this ideal 
in view that a Church must deal with questions of divorce 
and with whatever threatens the security of women and 
the stability of the home. Mindful of our Lord's words, 
"What therefore God hath joined together, let not man 

"put asunder," it affirms as Our Lord's principle and 
standard of marriage, a life-long and indissoluble union, 
for better, for worse, of one man with one woman, to the 
exclusions of all others on either side, and calls on all 
Christian people to maintain and bear witness to this 
standard." 

In cases of divorce the Conference, while passing no 
judgment on the practice of regional or national Churches 
within our Communion, recommends that the marriage of 
one, whose former partner is still living, should not be 
celebrated according to the rites of the Church. 

Where an innocent person has remarried under civil 
sanction and desires to receive the Holy Communion, it 
recommends that the case should be referred for consid- 
eration to the Biishop, subject to provincial regulations. 

Finally, it would call attention to the Church's unceas- 
ing responsibility for the spiritual welfare of all her 
members who have come short of her standard in this as 
in any other respect, and to the fact that the Church's 
aim, individually and socially, is reconciliation to God 



and redemption from sin. It therefore urges all Bishops 
and Clergy to keep this aim before them. 

(4) In all questions of marriage and sex the Confer- 
ence emphasises the need of education. It is important 
that before the child's emotional re-action to sex is a- 
wakened, definite information should be given in an at- 
mosphere of simplicity and beauty. The persons directly 
responsible for this are the parents, who in the exercise 
of this responsibility will themselves need the best guid- 
ance that the Church can supply. 

(5) During childhood and youth the boy or the girl 
should thus be prepared for the responsibilities of adult 
life; but the Conference urges the need of some further 
preparation for those members of the Church who are 
about to marry. 

(6) To this end the Conference is convinced that steps 
ought to be taken (1) to secure a better education for 
the clergy in moral theology; (2) to establish, Where they 
do not exist, in the various branches of the Anglican 
Communion central councils which would study the prob- 
lems of sex from the Christian standpoint and give ad- 
vice to the responsible authorities in diocese or parish 
or theological college as to methods of approach and lines 
of instruction; (3) to review the available literature and 
to take steps for its improvement and its circulation. 

(7) The Conference emphasizes the truth that the 
sexual instinct is a holy thing implanted by God in human 
nature. It acknoweldges that intercourse between hus- 
band and wife as the consummation of marriage has a 
value of its own within that Sacrament, and that thereby 
married love is enhanced and its character strengthened. 
Further, seeing that the primary purpose for which 
marriage exists is the procreation of children, it believes 
that this purpose as well as the paramount importance in 
married life of deliberate and thoughtful self-control 
should be the governing considerations in that intercourse. 

(8) The Conference affirms (1) the duty of parent- 
hood as the glory of married life; (2) the benefit of a 
family as a joy in itself, as a vital contribution to the 
nation's welfare, and as a means of character-building 
for both parents and children; (3) the privilege of dis- 
cipline and sacrifice to this end. 

(9) Where there is a clearly felt moral obligation 
to limit or avoid parenthood, the method must be decided 
on Christian principles. The primary and obvious method 
is complete abstinence from intercourse as far as may be 
necessary in a life of discipline and self-control lived in 
the power of the Holy Spirit. Nevertheless in those 
cases where there is such a clearly-felt moral obligation, 
and where there is a morally sound reason for avoiding 
complete abstinence, the Conference agrees that other 
methods may be used, provided that this is done in the 
light of the same Christian principles. The Conference 
records its strong condemnation of the use of any methods 
of conception control from motives of selfishness, luxury, 
or mere convenience. 

(10) While the Conference admits that economic con- 
ditions are a serious factor in the situation, it condemns 
the propaganda which treats conception control as a way 
of meeting those unsatisfactory social and economic con- 
ditions which ought to be changed by the influence of 
Christian public opinion. 

(11) Sexual intercourse between persons who are not 
legally married is a grievous sin. The use of contracep- 
tives does not remove the sin. In view of the widespread 
and increasing use of contraceptives among the unmarri- 
ed and the extension of irregular unions owing to the 



December, 1930 



15 



diminution of any fear of "consequences," the Conference 
presses for legislation forbidding the exposure for sale 
and the unrestricted advertisement of contraceptives, and 
placing definite restrictions upon their purchase. 

(12) Fear of consequences can never, for the Christi- 
an, be the ultimately effective motive for the maintenance 
of chastity before marriage. This can only be found in 
the love of God and reverence for His laws. The Con- 
ference emphasizes the need of strong and wise teaching 
to make clear the Christian standpoint in this matter. 
That standpoint is that all illicit and irregular unions 
are wrong in that they offend against the true nature of 
love, they compromise the future happiness of married 
life, are antagonistic to the welfare of the community 
and, above all, they are contrary to the revealed will of 
God. 

(13) The Conference desires to express the debt which 
the Church owes to the devotion of those who in constantly 
changing conditions, and in the face of increasing diffi- 
culties have maintained and carried forward the Pre- 
ventive and Rescue work of the Church. Such devotion 



calls for greatly increased interest and support from all 
the members of the Church. 

The removal of the causes which lead to the necessity 
for such work must first and foremost be sought in the 
creation of that healthier atmosphere and the more thor- 
ough giving of sex instruction which are recommended in 
preceding resolutions. And this is recognized to the full 
by the leaders in the work. There is, however, at the 
present time urgent need for (1) much greater financial 
support, so that the workers may be adequately trained 
and adequately paid (2) more regular interest on the 
part of Church people generally in them and in their 
work, (3) the help which the men of the Church can give 
in technical and legal matters, as also in personal service. 

The Conference further desires in this connection to 
place on record its appreciation of the work done by 
Women Police in Great Britain in the British Dominions 
and in the United States of America, and by those many 
social workers, in different parts of the world, who give 
themselves to the same difficult task. 

(Continued next month) 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Statement of Amounts Paid on Apportionments for the Church's Program- 

and General to December 1st, 1930 



-Diocesan 



{location Parish 


Apportionment 
PARISHES 


raia Dy 
Parishes & 
3h. Schools 


Due to 
Dec. 1st 


Atkinson, St. Thomas' ._ . 


$ 100.00 


« 16.91 


$ 74.74 


Ayden. St. James' 


320.00 


54.35 


239.00 


Aurora, Holy Cross _ 


500.00 


106.00 


352.30 


Bath, St. Thomas' 


100.00 


34.50 


67.15 


Beaufort,. St. Paul's 


600.00 


266.80 


283.20 


Belhaven, St. James' _ 


600.00 


315.49 


142.81 


fionnerton, St. John's - 


100.00 


67.35 


24.30 


Chocowinity, Trinity . 


__ 100.00 


13.65 


78.00 


Clinton, St. Paul's _. 


400.00 


36.07 


330.53 


Creswell, St. David's 


700.00 


211.07 


430.68 


Edenton, St. Paul's - 


2.500.00 


1,917.30 


374.40 


Elizabeth City, Christ Church 


2,000.00 


1,284.67 


548.73 




400.00 


16.00 


350.60 




_ 3,300.00 


2,005 88 


1,019 12 


fayetteville, St. Joseph's 


... . 200.00 


51.06 


132.24 


Gatesville, St. Mary's . . 


200.00 


69.20 


114.10 


Goldsboro, St. Stephen's 


1,200.00 


500.00 


600.00 


Greenville, St. Paul's . 


1,500.00 


1,026.00 


850.00 


Grifton, St. John's 


. . 250.00 


9.63 


219.67 


.Hamilton St. Martin's 


100.00 


50.00 


41.65 


Hertford. Holy Trinity 


1,000.08 


175.00 


741.70 


Hope Mills, Christ Church 


160.00 


50.00 


87.50 


Jessama, Zion . 


125.00 


87.51 


27.09 


Kinston, St. Mary's .. 


1,800.00 


400.00 


1.250.00 


Lake Landing, St. George's . 


125.00 
3.000.00 


119.73 
647.25 




New Bern, Christ Church 


>2,102,75 


New Bern, St. Cyprian's 


. .. 400.0(1 


319.91 


46.69 


Plymouth, Grace Church ..... 


. 400.00 


125.00 


241.60 


Red Spring's, St. Stephen's 


... .. 100.00 


42.00 


49.65 


Roper, St. Luke's 


350.00 


232.08 


88.77 


Seven Springs, Holy Innocents' . 240.00 


12.80 


207.20 


Southport, St. Philip's 


260.00 


118.70 


110.50 


Waneeboro, St. Paul's 


50.00 


7.50 


38.35 


-Washington, St. Peter's 


8,600.00 


2,411.12 


838.88 


Williarnston, Advent 


300.00 


25.07 


249.93 


•Wilmington, Good Shepherd 


300.00 


353.86 




Wilmington, St. James' 


.. _. 13,380.00 


11,256.85 


1.008.15 


Wilmington St. John's 


3,000.00 


2,482.45 


267.55 


Wilmingtoi, St. Mark'B 


200.00 
2,000.00 


197.75 
842.70 




Wilmington, St. Paul's -. 


990.70 


Windsor, St Thomas' 


600.00 


101.10 


448.90 


Winton, St. John's 


200.00 


;Lil 


183.30 


Woodville. Grace Church 


500.00 


67.13 


391.17 


ORGANIZED MISSIONS 




.Belhaven, St. Mary's 


105.00 


42.00 


54.25 


'Burgaw. St. Mary's . 


100.00 


74.45 


17.20 



Columbia. St. Andrew's 

Edenton, St. John-Evangelist _. 

Elizabeth City, St. Philips' 

Fairfield, All Saint's '. 

Faison, St. Gabriel's __ 

Goldsboro, St. Andrew's 

Kinston, St. Augustine's 

Lumberton, Trinity _ 

Maxton, St. Matthew's 

Morehead City, St. Andrew's 

North West, All Souls' 

Oriental, St. Thomas' ... 

Pikeville, Mission 

Roxobel, St. Mark's „_ 

Sladesville, St. John's 
Snow Hill, St. Barnabas' 

Sunbury, St. Peter's _'. 

Swan Quarter. Calvary 

Trenton, Grace Church . 

Warsaw, Calvary 

Washington, St.. Paul's _ .... 

Whiteville, Grace Church ._._ 

Winterville, St. Luke's 

Wrightsville, St. Andrew's .. 
Yeatesville. St. Matthew's — 



300.00 

150.00 
25.00 
20.00 
60.00 

100.00 
60.00 

100.00 
25.00 
70.00 
50.00 
10.00 
50.00 

125.00 
30.00 

200.00 
75.00 
60.00 

125,00 
40.00 

150.00 
90.00 

200.00 

100.00 

100.00 



60.00 
117.50 
11.32 
20.00 _ 
50.00 _ 

50.00 
101.42 _ 

82.42 _ 



243.35 
20.00 
11.63 



10.00 

93.75 

30.00 

125.00 

7.00 
125.00 



UNORGANIZED MISSIONS 



Aurora; St. Jude's 
Avoca, Holy Innocents' 

Beaufort,' St. Clement's 

Greenville, St. Andrew's 

Haddock's X Roads, St. Stephen's 

Jasper, St. Thomas' i. 

Murfreesboro. St Barnabas' 

Pollocksvill-;, Mission 

Robersonville, Mission _ 

Roper, St. Ann's 

Williarnston, St, Ignatius' . 

Wilmington, "Brooklyn"', Mission 
Wrightsville. St; Augustine's 



50.00 
100.00 
40.00 
50.00 
65.00 
50.00 
60.00 
48.00 
25.00 
25.00 
30.00 
15.90 
20.00 



60.00 
90.00 
199.30 
51.01 
59.86 



j. 

60.00 
19.00 
15.00 



23.53 
21.00 
22.49 



PAROCHIAL MISSIONS 
Campbeltpn, St. Phillip's . 100.00 

Kinston, Christ Church .1 .. . _ 50.00 

Tolar-Hart. Good Shepherd ._ 46^00 



7.11 
19.65 
15.00 
10.00 



42.07 
60.00 
13.00 



91.65 
6.70 

22.95 

45.85 

45.85 
20.85 

58.30 
68.80 
48.00 

36.70 
87.50 



40.64 
31.80 



45.85 
31.65 
17.70 
30.85 
59.60 
22.32 
24.85 
21.51 
22.95 
15.84 
7.85 



8.30 



49.58 



28.25 



Total Apportionments — 1930 % 60,303.00 

Amount due to December 1st . . $46,111.01 

Paid by Parishes, Missions and Church Schools _ _ 29,829.81 



Balance due to December 1st 



..$ 16,281.20 



16 



The Mission Herald 



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generosity of founders. For cat- 
alogue apply to 

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Passenger Schedules 
Effective December 29, 1929, via Norfolk 
Southern Railroad, Elizabeth City. N. C. 
Lv. 12:15 P. M.— Raleigh, New Bern, Golda- 
boro, Beaufort and inter- 
mediate points. 

Lv. 10:26 P. M.— Raleigh, New Bern, Golda- 
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Fayetteville and intermed- 
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Lv. 5:60 A. M. -Norfolk and intermediate 
points. 

Lv. 2 :50 P. M. — Norfolk and intermediate 
points. Connections North 
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Far further information, reservations, etc. 
apply to 

J H. TUCKER. Ticket Agt 

Elisabeth Oitr. K. C 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 
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Raleigh, North Carolina 

An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daughter receive her 
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Rev. Warren W. Way, A.M., D.D., Rector 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 2 years' college 
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20- Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. Indoor 
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For Catalogue and View Book address 
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Chapel Hill, N. C, 



Jan. '29 



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JANUARY 1931 INDEX 



Page 
.... _ 2 
._.. 2 



St. Thomas, Ahoskie, Consecrated 

Reverend . _ 

Bishop's Letter l_ 3 

Program Diocesan Convention 4 

Why Support Missions . 5 

Meeting Department of Missions 5 

St. Paul's, Edenton 7 

Prayer Before Holy Communion 7 

Editorials . 8 

St. Stephen's, Goldsboro 9 

Brotherhood Supper 9 

Scheme to Help Unemployed 9 

The Orphanage 10 

Men Wanted 10 

Student Work at E. C T. C 11 

The Isolated 11 

Church School Service Program 11 

To Societies Convocation of Edenton 12 

To Societies Convocation of Wilmington _ —.13 

Notes on Inter-Racial Work 13 

Lambeth Resolutions 15 

* $ s£ 

ST. THOMAS', AHOSKIE, CONSECRATED 

ON Sunday morning, January 11, at 11 o'clock, 
Rt Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., consecrated 
St. Thomas' Episcopal Church here. It was a 
most beautiful and impressive service and well 
attended. The usual form for the consecration of 
a church was followed. The/ Bishop, followed 
next by the clergy present and then the choir led 
the procession into the church. The sentence of 
consecration was read by the Rev. W. R. Noe, of 
Wilmington, N. C-, and former rector of the Epis- 
copal churches in Gates and Hertford counties. 
The Bishop preached, celebrated the Holy Com- 
munion, and confirmed a class of seven. Members 
of the choirs from St. Thomas' Church, Windsor, 
from the four other churches in Gates and Hert- 
ford counties, and other friends assisted the local 
choir with the music. 

The out-of-town clergy attending and taking 
part in the service were: Rt. Rev. Thomas C. 
Darst, D. D-, of Wilmington, N. C; Rev. Robert 
B. Drane, D. D., of Edenton ; Rev- W. R. Noe, of 
Wilmington, N. C. ; and Rev. Sidney E. Matthews, 
of Washington, N. C-, who was formerly of this 
county. 

. An Episcopal Church in Ahoskie has been the 
dream of a number of the Churchmen in this part 
of the diocese and of Bishop Darst for a long 
time. Rev. John B. Gibble, former Rector of the 
work in'Gates and Hertford counties, now Rector 
of the Church of the Good Shepherd, Wilmington, 
wag responsible for purchasing a lot in the most 
desirable section of the town for the Church in 



The Mission Herald 

1909. However, funds for building a Church could 
not be secured at that time. In the course of time 
some six hundred dollars has been raised. A 
thousand dollars was given from the Graham 
Fund, made possible by Mrs- W. A. Graham, of 
Edenton, and five hundred dollars given by the 
American Church Building Fund. Early in Sep- 
tember, 1930, work was begun and by January 
1, 1931, the beautiful little Church was completed. 
It is brick veneer, twenty-six by forty feet in di- 
mensions and very neatly finished inside and furn- 
ished. The furniture from St. Joseph's, Roduco, 
was painted over to make it match in with the 
color scheme giving the interior of the entire 
Church a splendid appearance. 

Ahoskie was a village, that became a town over 
night. With the many new people coming in 
there were a number of devoted Episcopal- 
ians. They wanted their Church and worked 
and prayed for it until they have it. Bishop 
Darst has held occasional services here since he 
has been Bishop and has had a keen interest in 
Ahoskie all these years- Last February arrange- 
ments were made for Rev. Frank D. Dean to 
preach a mission here and one evening during the 
week, February 19, the group of Episcopalians 
met in the parlor of the Garrett Hotel and sixteen 
signed an application to the Bishop to become an 
Organized Mission. This was negotiated. 

A Chapter of the Woman's Auxiliary was or- 
ganized about the same time and the ladies have 
gone forward since with great enthusiasm and 
devotion, doing a most commendable work in rais- 
ing funds and in their study classes. 
LEON MALONE, 

Minister-in-Charge 

* * * 

REVEREND 

We revere people who are set away from the 
great mass of folks by distinctions laid upon them 
or which they earn. 

Sometimes the reverence toward position in- 
spired at first acquaintance is destroyed by per- 
sonal lacks and faults in the person put upon 
that position. 

Again, the personality and character of a 
person first given reverence because of position 
earn for himself alone a love that is warmer than 
reverence alone. 

In this latter group Goldsboro, Pikeville and 
folks of this section number Reverend W. 0. Cone, 
who this Sunday past completed ten years of 
service among us. 

This is a man rightly revered, loyally loved by 
all among whom he has so unselfishly served. — 
Goldsboro, News-Argus. 



The Mission Hera! 



VOL. XLV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C-, JANUARY, 1931 



No. 1 



The Bishop's Letter 

THE first Sunday in December found me in 
Goldsboro where I spent a busy, happy day. 

At 11 o'clock I preached and confirmed three 
persons, presented by the rector, Rev. W. O. Cone, 
in St. Stephen's Church. 

In the afternoon I preached and confirmed one 
person, presented by Mr. Cone, in St- George's 
Church, Pikeville. and at 7:30 in the evening I 
preached and confirmed three persons, presented 
by the priest in charge, Rev. 0. J. McLeod, in St. 
Andrev/'s Church. Goldsboro. 

On the morning of Sunday, the fourteenth, I 
preached in Holy Trinity Church, Hertford. 

In the afternoon I preached in St. Joseph's 
Church. Camden, where regular services have 
been resumed by the 



At night I preached, and confirmed one person, 
presented by the priest in charge, Rev. S. N. Grif- 
fith in St. John Evangelist's Church, Edenton. 

On Christmas Day I had the privilege of at- 
tending services with my family in St. James' 
Church, Wilmington. 

On Sunday, the twenty-eighth, at 11 a. m I 
preached, and confirmed seven persons, presented 
by the rector, Rev. F. D. Dean, M. D„ in St. An- 
drew's Church, Wrightsville Sound. 

In the afternoon I preached in the Episcopal 
Mission at Delgado mill village, near Wilmington, 
and confirmed one person, presented by the Rev. 
Alexander Miller. 

The faithful lay reader, Mr. Ashley T. St 
Amand, who has labored so zealously in this. 
mission since its beginning, conducted the service. 

The service in the 



rector of Christ 
C h u r c h Elizabeth 
Pity. 

At 7 o'clock that 
evening I confirmed 
\ o persons, presented 
by the priest in charge 
Rev. S. N. Griffith, in 
St. Phillip's Church. 
Elizabeth City. 

At 8 o'clock. I preached and confirmed 12 per- 
sons, presented by the rector, Rev. George F. 
Hill and one person, presented by the Rev. E. T. 
Jillson, of Hertford, in Christ Church. Elizabeth 
City. 

On the evening of the seventeenth I attended 
a meeting of. the vestry of St. Mark's Church, 
Wilmington, at which time a call was extended 
to the Rev. S. W. Grice, Warden of the Bishop 
Payne Divinity, to the rectorship of St. Mark's, 
made vacant by the resignation of the Rev. Gus- 
tave H. Caution. 

On the evening of the nineteenth, 1 had the 
privilege of attending a delightful parish supper 
in St Paul's Parish House, Edenton. 

On the afternoon of the twentieth I confirmed 
a sick man in his home in Chowan County, the 
candidate for confirmation was presented by the 
K'ev. Robert 1>. Drane, D. D. 

On Sunday, the twenty-first at 11 a. m. I 
preached, confirmed six persons, presented by Dr. 
Drane, and celebrated Holy Communion in St- 
Paul's Church, Edenton. 

In the afternoon 1 preached in the auditorium 
of the Chowan High School at Meege- 



Lent Begins 

February 18 - Ash Wednesday! 

What are you planning 

to do with it? 



little mission was my 
last official act for the 
year 1930, and, taking 
it all in all, it was a 
very wonderful year 
and one for which, in 
spite of disappoint 
ments and difficulties, 
I can thank God and 
take courage. 
1 hope to give you the story of the year in 
greater detail when I deliver my address at the 
Annual Convention in St. Paul's Greenville on the 
twenty-eighth of this month, and I am hoping and 
praying that I may look into the faces of somfs 
of my friends from every parish and mission of 
the Diocese at that time. You will find on a» 
other page of the Mission Herald an article telling 
you something of our hopes and plans for the 
convention. 

Looking forward with joy to seeing many of 
you at that time. 

I am faithfully and affectionately your friend 
and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 
* * # 

SHOW APPRECIATION OF RECTORS 
WORK 

A radio set was presented to Rev. W. 0. Con* 
by his congregation as he completed ten years 
work as rector of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church 
Rev. Mr. Cone came to Goldsboro December 115, 
1920. In delivering his sermon Sunday Rev. Mr 
Cone completed ten years of service in Goldsboro 



The Mission Herald 



Program Diocesan Convention 

Saint Paul's, Greenville 
Jan. 28-29, 1931 

Pre-Convention Meetings 

1. A supper meeting of the Diocesan Assembly 
of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, at 6:00 P. M., 
January 27th, with Mr. C. McD. Davis, of Wil- 
mington, presiding, 

2. A Mass Meeting in the interest of the work 
of the Diocesan Department of Religious Educa- 
tion, with Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, Vice-Chairman of 
the Department as leader, at 8:00 P. M., January 
27th. 

January 28th 
1. Celebration of the Holy Communion, 7:30 
A. M. 



2- Organization of the Convention, 
dress of the Bishop, 10 :00 A. M. 



and ad- 



3. Regular order of business (See Rules of 
Order).. 

Committee on Elections. 

Committee on New Parishes. 

Standing Committee. 

Treasurer. 

Committee on Finance, 

Committee on Canons- 

Committee on Unfinished Business, 

Committee on the State of the Church. 

Trustees of the Diocese. 

Trustees of the University of the South. 

Other Special Committees. 

Other Reports, 

Petitions and Memorials. 

Motions and Resolutions. 



Among the important matters to come before 
the Convention are: 

1. The Bishop's Address which will be unusual 
in many ways this year and will contain suggest- 
ions requiring the serious consideration of the 
Convention- 

2. Election of Deputies to the General Con- 
vention. 

3. Report of a special Committee appointed by 
the Bishop to formulate plans for this year, 

4. Address by Dr. John W. Wood of the Na- 
tional Department of Missions and Church Ex- 
tension (Wednesday evening, January 28th). 

5. Plans of the Diocesan Commission on Evan- 
gelism for 1931- 



6. Report of the special Committee on the 
work of Lay Readers. 

7. Reports of important Committees on Insur- 
ance, State of the Church, Church Pension Fund, 
and Thompson Orphanage. 

8. Report of the Executive Council, 



NOTE: The principal address at the Brother- 
hood meeting will be made by Mr. William F. Pel- 
ham, of Chicago. It is hoped that all the dele- 
gates to the Convention as well as the regular 

Brotherhood representatives will attend this 
meeting. 



The Bishop has appointed a special Committee, 
consisting of Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., Vice Chair- 
man of the Executive Council; Mr. George B. 
Elliott, Vice Chairman of the Department of Mis- 
sions and Church Extension; Rev. W. A. Lilly- 
crop, Vice Chairman of the Department of Re- 
ligious Education; Rev. Charles E. Williams, Vice 
Chairman of the Department of Christian Social 
Service; Rev. Alexander Miller, Vice Chairman of 
the Field Department; Rev. G. F. Hill, Vice Chair- 
man of the Publicity Department; Mrs. Henry 
J. MacMillan, President of the Woman's Auxiliary, 
with the Bishop and Executive Secretary as mem- 
bers ex-officio, to discuss and formulate plans to 
be presented at the meeting of the Annual Con- 
vention to be held in Greenville. 

The first meeting of the Committee was held in 
the Diocesan Office in Wilmington, January 16th, 
and other meetings will be held before the meet- 
ing of the Convention. 

The Treasurer reported to the Committee that 
there would be a deficit of more than $10,000.00 
for the year 1930 on account of the inability of the 
people under present conditions to pay in full their 
apportionments. He also reported that he had 
borrowed from the Bank, $9,000.00 during 1930 
to complete the payments on the General Church 
Quota, Provincial Synod Assessment and other 
Diocesan obligations. He submitted a proposed 
Budget amounting to a little more than $46,000.00 
for the year 1931 and stated that our reasonable 
expectations, based on reports on the Every Mem- 
ber Canvass amounted to about $41,000.00. The 
Committee is giving the whole matter careful 
consideration and will have something that will 
be helpful and constructive to present to the Con- 
vention- It is the hope of the Committee and of 
the Bishop that there will be representatives from 
each parish and mission at the Convention to help 
them work out in the finest and best way this 
important matter which means so much to the 
life of the Church. 



January, 1931 



6 



Why? 



? 



THE only way to approach the duty of support- 
ing missionary work in our own country and 
in the world, is through contact with our Lord 
Jesus Christ, and with loyalty and confidence in 
Him. It is inconceivable that anybody who pro- 
fesses to be a Christian should fail to be con- 
vinced of the missionary duty of the Church. 
Somebody has said, "If Christianity is not worth 
propagating, it is not worth having." To look at 
the world with the eyes and with the spirit of 
Jesus Christ must inevitably convince us. To say 
that we do not believe in missions is (I say it 
humbly and reverently) to deny Him, that is, to 
contradict the whole meaning and purpose of 
His life. 

We should regard the opportunity to pledge and 
give to missions as a privilege. To disregard that 
privilege is the beginning of spiritual decadence. 
The only way to keep our souls alive is to think 
with Jesus Christ and to obey Him in spirit and 
in truth- The only way to keep a parish alive is 
for it, its rector, vestry and people, to express in 
their prayers and in their serving and giving a 
missionary spirit. There is no surer way for a 
parish to die than for it to be fearful and timid, 
and selfishly concerned about its own preserva- 
tion. The spirit of adventure and faith is the 
spirit of life.— BISHOP F. F. REESE. 
# * * 

G/lnnual Meeting 

Dept, Missions and Church Extention 

Christ Church, New Bern 

November 9, 1930 

APPROXIMATELY fifty members, repre- 
senting the various parishes and missions, 
from Elizabeth City, in the northeast of the 
Diocese, to Lumberton in the southwest, and from 
Wilmington, in the southeast, to the northwest, 
were present. The Diocese was well represented, 
though some of the important parishes had no 
representative in attendance. Local conditions, 
which were explained to some extent by the 
Bishop, were responsible for these few absences. 

The entire membership attended the eleven 
o'clock service at Christ Church and heard an 
inspiring sermon by the Bishop. After the serv- 
ice a turkey dinner was served in the parish hall 
by the ladies of Christ Church. After dinner a 
business meeting was called, to order at 1 :30 in the 
church. Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, ex-officio 



chairman, was present and sat with the meet- 
ing, but requested Mr- Elliott, vice-chairman, to 
preside. 

Mr. Elliott, vice-chairman, made a statement 
to the meeting, outlining its objects and purposeSj 
stressing the necessity of recognition of its spirit 
ual aspect, urging that it be not regarded as a 
mere machine for the raising of money. Then 
followed a general discussion of conditions in the 
various parishes and missions of the Diocese, 

Mr. W. G. Gaither of Christ Church, Elizabeth; 
City, recommended to the meeting the establish 
ment of a Foundation to consist of three or more 
Trustees, to be authorized and empowered to re- 
ceive gifts, donations and bequests by will, to be' 
administered for the benefit of the Church in the 
Diocese of East Carolina. There was considerable: 
discussion, after which the following motion was 
made by Mr. Gaither, seconded and unanimously 
adopted- 

RESOLVED, that Mr. Gaither be and he is 
hereby requested to outline in detail his ideas 
and plans for the establishment of a Foundation 
or Board of Trustees of the character indicated 
and submit the same to the Department of Mis 
sions and Church Extension of the Executive 
Council, with request that the said Department, 
in conjunction with Mr. Gaither, put the mattes 
in shape for recommendation to the Annual Con 
vention of the Diocese of East Carolina, to be held 
in January, 1931, at Greenville, in the hope that 
the said Annual Convention will ratify, approve 
and authorize the establishment of the Founds 
tion, upon such terms as it shall deem proper. 

The chairman, having reported that the Diocese 
as a whole was meeting its obligations well, but 
had fallen slightly behind during the month of 
October, there followed a report by the several 
parishes and missions represented, which were m 
arrears. The reports were all hopeful and imspir 
ing and, practically without exception, the repr© 
sentatives present felt able to promise that the 
shortage would be made good by or before the 
end of the year. 

The meeting was closed by a short address by 
the Bishop, who expressed his gratification at the 
spirit shown by the representatives present and 
his hopefulness for the future of the work. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 

GEORGE B. ELLIOTT, Vice-Chairma.o 
* * * 

Look on the cover of this issue, or the wrapper, 
to see when your subscription expires. 



The Mission Herald 



MEETING OF CLERGY 

By REV. STEPHEN GARDNER 

FEELING the need of a closer fellowship among 
the clergy of the northern part of the Diocese 
of East Carolina the first of a series of get-to- 
gether meetings of the clergy was held in Ahoskie 
In.Re.rtie County, the newest mission in the 
Diocese, This place was selected for the first 
meeting because it was the newest mission in the 
Diocese, because the youngest clergyman of the 
Diocese, a deacon, the Rev. Leon Malone, was in 
charge, and because a new church building was 
just being completed. 

Of the twelve possible clergymen, six attended 
this first meeting, namely, — the Rev. Robert 
Brent Drane, D. D., rector of St. Paul's Church, 
Edenton, the Rev. Stephen Gardner, rector of St 
Peter's Church, Washington, the Rev. E. T, 
Jillson. rector of Holy Trinity Church, Hertford, 
the Rev. Worth Wicker, rector of St. James' 
Church, Belhaven, the Rev. Sidney Matthews, 
missionary in Beaufort County, and the Rev. Leon 
Malone, deacon-in-charge of St. Thomas' Mis- 
sion, Ahoskie- 

The fellowship meeting was held in Garrett 
Hotel in Ahoskie culminating in a luncheon, 
which was a "dutch treat." At the luncheon the 
clergy present accepted the invitation of the Rev. 
Dr. Drane to meet with him in Edenton next 
time. Dr. Drane was requested to prepare a paper 
on "reminiscences." Since the clergy should be 
leaders in getting their flocks to attend Church, 
and since six of the clergy excused themselves 
from nttendiing this meeting, a suggestion was 
made that the clergy, thus failing to attend, read 
the parable of "The Great Supper." 

The clergy who were visiting Ahoskie for the 
first time were surprised to find that Will Rogers 
Hived in that town. Will is the chairman of the 
Building Committee of the church. He was the 
first to arrive to escort the clergy to the new 
church building. He gathered the other members 
of the Building Committee, among whom was the 
sheriff of the county. 

A visitation was made to the church, which is 
a beautiful brick building, large enough to ac- 
commodate a congregation of a little more than 
one hundred. The church is called St. Thomas', in 
honor of the Bishop of the Diocese. The clergy 
were well pleased with the building and also with 
the prospects for the work of the church in Ahos- 
kie. The Rev. Dr. Drane called the clergy and the 
members of the committee to prayer before leav- 
ing the church. The Bishop will be in Ahoskie 
on the second Sunday in January, the first Sun- 
day after Epiphany, to consecrate the church. 



NEWS FROM THE CHURCH ARMY 
MISSION VAN 

HAVE you been wondering where the Church 
Army Mission Van has been working of 
late? You hear so little of its movements and of 
what it is doing in the Diocese that I expect you 
think it has given up the ghost. I am glad that 
Mr. Hill has asked me for a brief article for this 
number of the Mission Herald because I can now 
give you a short resume of the work during the 
past year. 

The Mission Van was active for eight months 
during 1930, during which time some twenty-six 
Preaching Missions were conductted chiefly in 
rural communities, and in many cases in churches 
where we haven't a regular clergyman. 

Hundreds of people have attended the services, 
many taking definite steps for baptism and con- 
firmation either directly or indirectly through the 
missions. Scattered homes throughout the 
Diocese have received visits from the evangelist 
who has left suitable religious pictures and tracts 
behind. Thousands of boys and girls of East 
Carolina in the Public Schools have listened-in to 
the glad news as brought to them by the Church 
Army Mission Van. 

During the later part of November a visit was 
paid to Kilkenny, an isolated community of about 
thirty-five families in Tyrell County where no 
regular services of any description had been held 
for a long time, and where the Episcopal Church 
had never been seen or heard of before. Simple 
services were held in the homes of the people in 
different parts of the community scattered over 
a distance of five or six miles. The people begged 
me to stay longer and promised to build me a 
house, and keep me in hog meat, corn and col- 
lards if I would remain- 

The New Year opens with work in Bertie 
County with Rev. Leon Malone. I am working 
alone in the Diocese now, directly under the juris- 
diction of the Bishop, Cadets Lewis and Hosking 
are continuing there studies in our Training Col- 
lege at Providence, and Captain Bence has re- 
cently left the society. 

With a grateful heart for the privilege of 
working in your Diocese under the leadership of 
your beloved Bishop, and counting on your 
prayers for the work in the coming year. 
CAPT. FRED TURNER, C. A. 

*s* Sj» JJC 

THE CHURCH ARMY 

BISHOP GILBERT, addressing the third an- 
nual meeting of the Church Army, on Decem- 
ber 11, emphasized the really tremendous contri- 
bution which the young men of the Church Army 



January, 1931 



have been making to the spiritual enrichment of 
the Church. When they first arrived in this coun- 
try, the Bishop said, they landed on the doorstep 
of his former office in the old Diocesan house at 
416 Lafayette Street, twenty men who curled up 
in their blankets and went to sleep on the floor, a 
procedure typical of their simple Jiving and their 
readiness to meet any conditions. 

They have gone about uncovering needs, reach- 
ing communities and individuals not reached 
otherwise, connecting them with the parish 
clergy, and putting a new emfphasis on the duty 
of every Church member, man or woman, to be 
active in some way in the work of evangelism- 
One of the men, during the past year, visited a 
rural area in the State of New York which con- 
cerns three dioceses, New .York, Central New 
York and Albany, where their boundaries con- 
verge on the Pennsylvania State line. At the re- 
cent synod of the second province a committee 
representing these three dioceses was appointed 
to follow up the work thus begun. 

It is said that the Diocese of Albany contains 
the wildest country east of the Rocky Mountains, 
with any number of people who have never seen a 
town or a trolley car. Captain Abraham, explor- 
ing the region, stopped to talk with a man and 
asked, "What do you do for religion around here ?" 
He received the characteristic answer, " Nothing." 
In this case, the man asked the captain to pray 
for a sick child, and a way was opened to begin 
and continue church work. 

The Church Army evangelist makes house to 
house calls, secures permission to use the school 
house, and starts church school and simple serv- 
ices along church lines, the nearest parish priest 
coming to help as often as he can. One woman 
told the Church Army captain he was the first 
minister to come to her house in fourteen years. 
Her husband has since been baptized and con- 
firmed, and three more of the family are to be 
confirmed. 

Out in Utah, working from a center, the 
Church Army men visited the coal camps that 
lie out in all directions. Among the people are 
Orientals, Mexicans, Italians- In one place a 
theatre was secured for services. Sunday schools 
are often a good point for beginning, because even 
when the older people seem not to want religion 
for themselves, they want it for their children. 

Mrs, David Clark of South Dakota reported that 
the one Church Army woman now in the United 
States, Sister Annie Horner, working among 
white people and Indians, is doing such welcome 



work that people come from other reservations to 
ask why they also may not have such a person. 

Back of the evangelists and teachers of the 
Church Army are the groups of associates. There 
are so far only eight such groups in this country, 
and more are needed. An associate is a man or 
woman, old or young, who promises to pray and 
to give for the work of the Church Army. 

The headquarters address is 416 Lafayette 

Street, New York City. 

* * * 

ST. PAUL'S, EDENTON 

By R. E. DBASE, D. D. 

THE Every Member Canvass was carried out 
by each of the vestrymen taking a list of the 
names of parishioners, and so waiting on every 
member, leaving a pledge card, ready to answer 
questions, and asking for the return of the cards, 
signed, on the following Sunday, placed on the 
collection plates to be reverently presented and 
placed upon the altar. 

It is not yet possible to know the outcome ox 
that canvass. Bishop Darst came to Edenton, by 
special request, a day in advance of his Sunday 
appointment, to accept a reception given him by 
St. Paul's parishioners, in the parish house, and 
to render a special service of confirmation to an 
invalid, in the country. 

Notwithstanding the rainy night, the social 
gathering was well attended, and at its close there 
were many expressions of satisfaction and pleas- 
ure for the occasion. The Bishop was especially 
instructive and suggestive in his address ; and the 
rector was complimented by being classed— 
almost — with the Bishop; and there were im- 
promptu addresses, or remarks, all very well re- 
ceived, which fact may indicate the fine, syxnpa- 
thetic spirit of the company. 

Refreshments, very attractive, were served by 
St. Mary's Guild. 



PRAYER BEFORE HOLY 
COMMUNION 

OLord. my Master, prepare me to receive 
Thee in this Holy Sacrament; then come 
in all Thy might- Let Thy strength make 
me strong, let Thy purity make me pure, let 
Thy gentleness make me kind; that as Thy 
fellow-worker I may help to make this world 
a better place, according to Thy will, wb o art 
God for ever and ever. Amen. 



The Mission Herald 



Morgan of the diocese of east Carolina 

Published Monthly, except August, at 
'" ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

"Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 

'"'• ; ■' Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elisabeth City, N. C, 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D, 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent pei- word. 
Entered as ' second class matter at the Post Office,, 
BHiieabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failEng to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 

addresses. 

...Jf. aft* ifia 

tfi tp itf 

AN OSTRICH? 

T is said that the ostrich sticks his head in the 
sand when danger approaches thinking him- 
self securely hid. There is no need for the au- 
thorized delegates to the diocesan convention to 
do like the ostrich by staying at home, instead of 
attending the convention. If there is danger to 
our diocesan Church because our income for 1930 
was nearly $10,000.00 less than expectations, it 
is needful that every parish and mission send good 
and true men to the convention to find a way out 
of our trouble. The facts must be faced for 1931. 
Hiding at home does not eliminate the danger. 
You are needed at the convention, for what passes 
the .convention effects your parish or mission 
whether you are there or not. 

TO WHOM SHALL WE GO? 

OTES on Inter-Racial Work in this issue is 
a most interesting article, and sets forth a 
most practiical application of the very essence of 
Christianity. This application will run counter to 
the prejudices of many of us but we cannot deny 
'that it is the Christianity of Christ- Will we 

follow our prejudices or our Savior? 

; '' # 

TO BE OR NOT TO BE 

SINCE September first, 1930, it has been neces- 
sary to drop nearly 300 names from our sub- 
scription list and before 60 days more it may be 
necessary to drop 200 more. Statements have 
been sent to these several times and only a very 
few reply. This cannot go on. One of three 
things must be done and that very soon: 



1. In each parish and mission the rector, the 
Woman's Auxiliary or some parish or- 
ganization, must secure subscriptions. 

2. The Mission Herald must cut its size from 
16 pages to 8 pages, or less. 

3- Do without the Mission Herald altogeth- 
er. 

Is the Mission Herald of any value to you in 
your work in the Church of East Carolina ? Every 
issue costs about $85.00 and subscriptions must 
take care of most of that cost. 

To secure subscriptions in a parish means an 
income for some one. Twenty cents is allowed 
on each $1.00 secured for new subscribers and ten 
cents allowed on each $1.00 secured for renewals. 
If some live wire individual in each parish would 
do this work he would not only make some money 
but be serving his diocesan Church. 

It is impossible for the editor to visit the par- 
ishes and missions of the diocese to make a house 
to house canvass for subscriptions, yet this is ab- 
solutely necessary to be done by some one, if the 
Mission Herald is to continue running 16 pages 
at $1.00 per year. 

For the past two years the Editor has been 
illegally lenient on subscribers in arrears. He 
must keep the law regarding second class mailing 
matter. To do this will necessitate the drop- 
ping of subscribers names when they get in ar- 
rears. Yet to do this does not reduce expenses, 
except a few cents postage, and also defeats the 
purpose of the paper, which is to put the Mission 
Herald in every family in the diocese. 

Whether the Mission Herald is to continue dur- 
ing 1931 must be settled at the Convention at 
Greenville- 
There would be no problem whatever if each 
parish and mission would make as a real part of 
their work to see that there is a subscriber in 
every family. 



NEW AUTOMOBILE SANTA'S GIFT TO 
REV. DR. ASHBY 



Santa Claus paid a visit yesterday to a Jackson- 
ville minister and left a bright, shiny, new auto- 
mobile at his home. 

The Rev. Charles A. Ashby, rector of the 
Church of the Good Shepherd, was presented with 
a handsome new six-cylinder car, given by an un- 
known donor. 

The popular Jacksonville minister was much 
surprised to receive the generous gift, but never- 
theless greatly appreciative. 

"Please convey my heartfelt thanks and appre- 
ciation to my anonymous friend," he asked the 
Times-Union to say to the kind benefactor. 



January, 1931 



ST. STEPHEN'S, GOLDSBORO 

By REV. W. O. CONE 

WHEN the rector returned from his vaca- 
tion in September, the vestry made him 
an offer to furnish lay-readers for every Sunday 
when morning prayer is read in the church, so 
long as he should continue in poor health. This 
offer was thankfully accepted, and these faithful 
vestrymen have not failed in the performance of 
their kindly offices. 

Several members of the Greek Orthodox 
Church living in Goldsboro subscribed liberally at 
last year's annual canvass, and these have all paid 
their pledges. Their children are enrolled in Sun- 
day School, and the families attend services when 
possible for them to do so. 

Andrew Falkener, for many years a valued 
member of the vestry, died after lingering illness 
at Chapel Hill in November. Nobody had a 
deeper place in the hearts of the parishioners and 
their fellow-townsmen of every creed and class, 
and no member of the parish had given more de- 
voted, faithful and intelligent service to the 
church. His memory will be cherished with 
thankfulness by "troops of friends." 

Before the Annual Canvass, copies of the book 
5 'Qur Expanding Church" were purchased in suf- 
ficient quantities that every family might have 
opportunity to read and consider the important 
matters discussed in it. 

Mrs. Mary Hosea, aged 90, the oldest member 
of the mission at Pikeville, died during Christmas 
week, and was buried beside her husband and sev- 
eral of her children near the village- She had 
been baptized and confirmed in 1914, and had 
since been a devout and practicing churchwoman, 
She was growing feeble while the church was 
fearful of never seeing it completed. It was a 
great joy to her and to the congregation that she 
could be present at the opening service of St. 
George's, two years ago. Most of her children and 
grandchildren have followed her into the com- 
munion of the church, being helped thereto by her 
godly precept and example. She rests in peace, 
and her memory will long be cherished in the 
community. 

The rector dedicated at Christmas the first 
group of figures of a Nativity Crib, given in 
memory of Mrs. Cone's father and mother, Dr. 
and Mrs. William Booth, who died in 1928- The 
figures were designed and made by Mr. Robbins, 
a church sculptor of New York, and are beauti- 
fully polychromed. They were unveiled at the 
children's service, Christmas Eve, and remained 
among the evergreens in the church until 
Epiphany. 



BROTHERHOOD SUPPER 

AT the Diocesan Convention, to be held in 
Greenville, January 27, 28 and 29, Bishop 
Darst has arranged to place the Brotherhood of 
St. Andrew first on the program. The plan is to 
open the convention with a Diocesan Assembly 
dinner in St- Paul's Parish House, Greenville, at 
6 o'clock on the evening of Tuesday, January 27. 

Mr. William F. Pelham, of Chicago, one of the 
outstanding members of the Brotherhood in the 
United States, is coming from Chicago to Green- 
ville for the purpose of addressing the brother- 
hood at the time of the dinner on the 27. I am 
sure he has a wonderfully inspiring message to 
deliver, which will be both profitable and enjoyable 
to those who hear him, and it is hoped there will 
be a large attendance. 

I am writing you this far in advance of the con- 
vention in order that you may be advised of the 
plans and to urge that you attend the Diocesan 
Assembly dinner. I also hope you will urge all the 
members of the brotherhood in your chapter who 
can possibly attend, to be on hand, as well as men 
who may not be members of the brotherhood. I 
think it would be well to specially call this dinner 
to the attention of male delegates to the conven- 
tion, so that they may certainly be in attendance 
on the evening of the 27th. Your co-operation in 
securing a large attendance will be greatly appre- 
ciated and will add much to the success of the oc= 
casion, and I wish to thank you in advance for 
your assistance. 

C. McD. DAVIS, 

President, Brotherhood of St. Andrew, Diocese 
of East Carolina. 

A SCHEME TO HELP THE UNEMPLOYED 

AT a meeting of the Parish Council of Christ 
Church, Elizabeth City, in the early fall of 
1930, the rector suggested that if each member of 
the various parish organizations at their first 
meeting of each month, would bring a gift of 
staple groceries for the parish charity work, it 
would be of tremendous help. 

Every organization immediately volunteered 
to do this, and they have responded most loyally 
and generously. Among the gifts received have 

been, sacks of flour, meal, Irish and sweet pota- 
toes, cabbages, turnips, sugar, oat meal, hominy,, 
grits, coffee, tea, macaroni, rice, salt, cocoa, and 
all kinds of canned goods, — tomatoes, peas, beets, 
beef, asparagus, soup, roe, peaches, etc. 

Inasmuch as the regular alms fund of the rec- 
tor cannot take care of the needs, these gifts have 



10 



The Mission Herald 



been a real blessing to many families the parish is 
taking care of in the city. 

The parish organizations taking part in this 
work are, the Woman's Auxiliary, Ladies' Guild, 
St. Catherine's Guild, Christ Church Guild, 
Church School teachers and pupils, and the 
Y. P. S- L. and the C. S. S. L. 

These groceries are distributed only when the 
need has been investigated, and of course in co- 
operation with the County Welfare Officer. That 
is, the County Welfare Officer is notified to whom 
we are giving groceries so that there will be no 
duplication- 

In our case the rector is the distributing agent 
inasmuch as he is a member of the County Wel- 
fare Board, but a parish committee on Christian 
Social Service or Welfare, could do the work as 
well. Co-operation with the County Welfare Offi- 
cer or the County Welfare Board is however very 
essential. 

This is written that other parishes not mak- 
ing use of this scheme and who are confronted 
with the problems of the unemployed, may put 
this method into effect. It has been of incalcul- 
able help in the welfare work of Christ Church. 

G. F. HILL. 

THANKSGIVING AND CHRISTMAS AT 
THE ORPHANAGE 

THE Orphanage was most generously remem- 
bered both at Thanksgiving and at Christ- 
mas by many devoted and loyal friends to all of 
whom the orphanage wishes to express heartfelt 
and grateful thanks. 

The list enclosed, of offerings from parishes 
and missions up to December 27, shows how gen- 
erously all have responded towards the main- 
tenance of the orphanage. 

In addition, many individual contributions have 
been received (some requesting that their names 
be not published) but all of them full of good 
wishes for the work of the orphanage. 

A great many Christmas boxes were received 
and to all who have contributed money or food 
or fruit or clothing the children desires to express 
their love and gratitude. 



List of Thanksgiving offerings from Parishes 
and Missions received to December 27, 1930: 

Church School, Aurora .. _ . $ 5.00 

Stephen's Guild Woman's Aux. Golds'ro 5.00 

Grace Sunday School, Plymputh 10.00 

St. Andrew's. Morehead City 1.25 

St. James, Ayden . .... .._ 12.56 

St. Phillip's Sunday School. Southport 8.57 



St. Paul's, Beaufort 51.99 

Holy Innocents, Seven Springs „__, 11.30 

Zion Sunday School, Jessama 1242 

St. John's S. S., Griffon 3.25 

St. Mary's S. S., Kinston 55.78 

St. Mary's S. S., Gatesville 6.37 

Christ Church, New Bern 12.00 

St. Martin's, Hamilton 6.00 

Grace, Trenton 8.00 

All Saints, Fairfield 5.00 

St. Matthew's, Yatesville 3-26 

St. Peter's, Washington 170.76 

St. Paul's, Clinton 19.5? 

St. John's, Fayetteville 135.46 

St. Mary's Guild W. A, Goldsboro 5.00 

St. Stephen's, Goldsboro 63.50 

St. Paul's, Wilmington .. _ 86.95 

St. John's, Wilmington 121.06 

St. Mary's, Kinston _ 130-34 

Christ Church, Hope Mills 10.50 

St. Andrew's, Columbia 4.10 

St. David's, Creswell . . 18.75 

St. Paul's, Edenton _._ 382.05 

St. Luke's S- S., Winterville 12.00 

St. John the Evangelist, Edenton 2.86 

Trinity. Lumberton 9.35 

Christ Church, Elizabeth City . .„ 142.85 

St. Paul's, Greenville 19.00 

Trinity, Chocowinity 12.00 

St. Mary's Guild W- A., Burgaw 5.00 

St. Paul's School, Beaufort _ - 5.00 

St. Mary's Guild, St. James' Parish, 

Wilmington . 25.00 

Woman's Auxiliary, Lake Landing H3.22 



Total 



$1,612.07 



* * * 

MEN WANTED 



CHURCH Army in U. S. A. lately kept its third 
birthday and though the Society has thirty 
evangelists on its staff, Capt B. F. Mountford, 
General Secretary, is calling for fifty recruits for 
the work of 1931-32. Of the men at present in 
training two came from as far Southwest as 
Texas, and one from Eastern Oregon. Others are 
from Northern New York State, New Jersey, New 
England and from Michigan. 

Very varied is the work undertaken by these 
evangelistic youths. The society has its worker* 
in the coal camps of Utah; the lumber camps of 
Virginia ; amongst the isolated in half a dozen 
states : and in the oil fields of New Mexico. 

The Church Army offers free training, with 
pocket money and expenses and a sufficient salary 
when commissioned. Young men from 20 to 30 
vears — unmarried — with a white hot '/eal for 



January, 1931 



Hi 



souls— convinced churchmen, lovers of their Lord, 
are the sort the army likes. A good education is 
an asset in this work of evangelism, but no man 
having only an average education would be 
barred, if other requisite qualities were evident. 

Applicants are invited to write, The Candidates 
Secretary, 416 Lafayette Street, New York, N. Y 
* * * 

STUDENT WORK AT EAST CAROLINA 
TEACHER'S COLLEGE 

THE Fall term was an exceptionally happy one 
for the Episcopal Students of East Carolina 
Teacher's College because when they arrived the 
last of September they found the new Parish 
House and Church had been built in which was 
the beautiful Student Center which the Diocese 
through the Girls' Friendly had made possible for 
them. 

Through the Fall months these new quarters 
were the happy gathering place for many stu- 
dents. The Friday Afternoon Club meetings, the 
Sunday morning Bible Class and the small inti- 
mate groups gathered around the open fire for 
many friendly hours- 

We feel that we must acknowledge with many 
thanks and much loving appreciation the many 
gifts that have found their way into our center. 
A piano and draperies for the windows were the 
outstanding gifts but the smaller things have 
each added their charm to the attractiveness and 
usefulness of our room. The girls have just 
framed and placed a picture of Bishop Darst. 

Our Christmas Club meeting was a very joyful 
and lovely one. There were the new curtains, an 
open fire blazing on the hearth, a softly lighted 
Christmas tree and many girls singing carols. 
It will not be soon forgotten. 

As the New Year begins we are looking for- 
ward to an even greater love and fellowship In 
this place of Friendship. 

For our Diocese we send many wishes that the 
New Year will bring to each one untold blessings 
and happiness, 

Owing to the general depression several of our 
girls could not return and to each one we send 
this message "We miss you!" 

Matilda Klein, president of the Bible class is 
being much missed this term but we are glad she 
has a school. 

Our love and best wishes go with Frances 
Windley who we hear is entering training at 
-Johns Hopkins- 

We are expecting you for the convention and 
we want you to feel that the Student Center be- 
longs to you and that a loving welcome will be 
waiting for you there.. 




Department of Religious Education 

MRS. RENA H. WALKER, Publioity Chairman 

THE ISOLATED 
Mrs. James Grist Staton, Williamston, N. C.„ 
desires to get in touch with every isolated indi- 
vidual, man, woman and young person in the Dio- 
cese. Her plans are being made for a definite 
program for this work among the isolated. She 
asks the co-operation of all those who may be 
called isolated, and those who may be in a position 
to give the names and addresses of those living 
beyond the boundaries of any parish or mission 

in East Carolina- 

* * * 

THE CHURCH SCHOOL SERVICE PROGRAM 

THE Service Program of the Church School is 
the means whereby the church hopes to train 
her children and young people in the knowledge 
of service for the spread of the Kingdom of God. 

Service is a necessary part of religious educa- 
tion of our young people hence the Service Pro- 
gram is placed under the Department of Educa- 
tion. 

The Department of Religious Education met 
November 17, 1930, in the Parish House of St 
Paul's Parish, Greenville, N. C. 

At this meeting, the Church School Service be- 
came a definite organization under the Depart- 
ment of Religious Education. 

' In order to guide this service properly, a group 
of leaders for the Diocese was appointed called the 
Service Program Committee. The Chairman of 
said Committee to be called the Diocesan Super- 
visor. 

This Committee is composed of the Diocesan 
Supervisor with the Secretaries of the following 
projects viz : 

Christmas Box Work, 

Birthday Thank Offering. 

The Lenten Offering. 

The Little Helpers 

The Y. P. S. L. 

Each Parish to have a Service Committee simi- 
lar to the Diocesan Committee whose duty it is to 
carry out the Diocesan Program. 

In small parishes the Committee may consist of 
only one member who can carry out the entire 
program. 

The aims of the service program are as follows : 

To work in the five fields. 

To have the five forms of service in each fiejd. 

To foster the national projects. 

To have week-day activities in every parish 
and mission. 



12 



The Miwuion Herald 



To divide the young people into groups accord- 
ing to grades in the church school or according to 
age or sex. The groups may be called by different 
names, such as, "Scouts," "Sir Galahad," "Fleur 
de Lis," "Camp Fire Girls" (The groups may 
select their own names.) 

The Y. P. S. L. for the older boys and girls who 
usually have their weekly meeting on Sunday 
evening. 

AH money for Nation, World and Diocese 
should be sent to our Diocesan treasurer, Rev. 
W. R- Noe. Money for parish and community 
should be entrusted to the group leaders or the 
local supervisor and expended as the group 
desires. 

Reports of all money spent and all work done 
sent to the Diocesan supervisor. 

Church school calendars, 

Lesson schedules, 

Week-day activities, group schedules and week- 
day activity yearly program have been printed by 
the Educational Department and can be secured 
from the Vice chairman of Education Department, 
Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, Greenville, N. C, or Mrs. 
H- M. Bonner, Greenville, N. C. 

The Diocesan committee consists of the follow- 
ing members : 

Mrs. H. M. Bonner, Diocesan Supervisor. Green- 
ville, N. C. 

Mrs. W. R. Noe, B. T- 0. Secretary, Wilming- 
ton, N. C. 

Mrs. Von Eberstein. Christmas Box Secretary, 
Washington, N. C. 

Miss Ida Peacock. Little Helpers Secretary. 
Roper, N- C. 

Miss Cornelia Harris. Y. P. S. L. Secretary, Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

Rev. W. R. Noe, Diocesan Treasurer. Wilming- 
ton, N. C. 

Please see that you have a service committee 
for your parish promptly. Write to the officers 
of your plans and state your problems. We are 
ready to help whenever we can. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. H. M. BONNER, Supervisor. 

*r * * 



f Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N C: % 

TO THE SOCIETIES IN THE CONVOCATION 
OF EDENTON 

AGAIN the New Year has come bringing with 
it a renewed call to service in the Master's 
name. May it be a happy one for all of you and 



be filled with blessings, both material and 
spiritual. 

I wish, first of all, to thank you and your offi- 
cers for your splendid co-operation in the work 
of the auxiliary. Without your interest and sup- 
port, nothing could be accomplished- I thank your 
officers for the quick response to all calls and 
letters. 

In spite of the distressing financial depression, 
assessments were paid almost 100 per cent, and 
the entire work of the Convocation measured up 
splendidly. The Community and Social Service 
Departments show a marked increase, which de- 
notes a deepening of the spiritual life of the 
Auxiliaries. 

It is most gratifying and encouraging to re- 
alize that you, as members of the auxiliary, were 
determined that the work should not suffer, but 
overcoming all difficulties, you put "first things 
first." a great step forward, you will agree. 

Enclosed you will find the definite work Bishop 
Darst has asked the women of East Carolina to 
take as their part of the Diocesan and National 
Church Program for 1931. Notice that there has- 
been a decrease in this amount this year. This 
decrease would have been greater, had it not been 
that the Diocese assumed certain obligations for 
this triennium and Bishop Darst looks to the 
women of the auxiliary to help him fulfill them. 
East Carolina has never failed to measure up to 
the standard set by our beloved Bishop and 1 
know you will do your best to fill your part of 
these apportionments- 

Our Annual Convention will meet this year in 
St. Paul's, Greenville, January 28 and 29. Please 
elect your delegate and send in her name to Mrs. 
E- B. Ficklen, Greenville, N. C. If you will con- 
sult your Annual, you will find that each organi- 
zation is entitled to its president as a delegate and 
one delegate for each 25 members. 

Your Diocesan president, Mrs. MacMillan, has 
prepared a most interesting program for the aux- 
iliary meetings (this will be sent later). Please 
show your interest by having your delegate pres- 
ent. Do not let the change in time of year of the 
meeting affect, your attendance. 

Accompanying this letter is an envelope for tin- 
"Bishop's Fund." Remember this is his own par- 
ticular fund for emergencies, given him by the 
women of East Carolina. This "fund" carries 
with it an especial blessing. Your present it at 
the solemn Corporate Communion sei-vice, the 
Bishop places it upon God's Altar, it then passes 
into his hands to be disbursed by him at his dis- 
cretion; it is a truly beautiful gift. 

During this year that lies before us, with its 



January, 1931 



13 



many opportunities for service in "His name," let 
us try to increase our attendance at meetings ; let 
us be faithful attendants ourselves and also in- 
terest other women in auxiliary work. By our 
devotion to our auxiliary work let us impress on 
others the privilege it is to be a member of that 
great organization of consecrated women in this 
church of ours, who daily and hourly endeavor to 
make "His Kingdom Come on Earth." 

If I can be of service to you at any time, please 
call on me, 

Most sincerely, 

MARY J. SHELBURNE, 
President of Convocation of Edenton. 

TO THE SOCIETIES IN THE CONVOCATION 
OF WILMINGTON 

I AM enclosing your apportionment for this 
year's work (1931), it is your part of the defi- 
nite work Bishop Darst has asked you to do. Your 
apportionment is a little less for this year, will 
you try to maintain your splendid record by 
finishing this work as soon as possible. Check 
should be sent to Mrs. A. H. Worth, Elizabeth 
City, N. C- You will be interested to know that 
your year's work was closed with all obligations 
met, and other splendid work was also accom- 
plished. I am deeply grateful to you for your fine 
spirit of co-operation, this co-operation has kept 
me in very close touch with the work as it prog- 
ressed. Another year has Just been closed, what 
has it told you that will help you in the year just 
ahead. 1930 was a year of testing, if during the 
past year you have learned to plan your work 
with greater care, and have tried to overcome ad- 
verse conditions, 1931 may easily be the best year 
you have ever had. It is when times are difficult 
that people grow in strength and ability. As we 
begin our 1931 work we should determine to make 
a little progress each day and to believe that we 
shall succeed, and to even find time to help some 
one less fortunate than ourselves. Our Annual 
Meeting will be held in St. Paul's Church, Green- 
ville, N. C-, January 28, will you try to have your 
full representation. Read Article 5, Section 1, 
Page 65 in your last Annual in regard to delegates. 
The names of your delegates should be sent to the 
Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, Greenville, N. C. As our 
convention meets in January instead of May, it 
will be necessary for you to plan early for the 
Bishop's Fund. Will you please notify me if you 
have changed your officers, I want to make my 
mailing list for this year as soon as possible. Fur- 
ther information will be sent to you about our 
Annual Meeting. Let us strive to make this year 



one of prayer and service, let us also do our work 
with all gladness. Happiness and brightness in 
God's service is a great gift, and one that wins 
others to Him. 1 wish for each one of you a happy 
New Year, and real happiness and joy in your 
work and courage to meet the needs of each 
new day. 

Sincerely, 

LILA M. ADAMS, 
President Convocation of Wilmington,. 
* * * 

NOTES ON INTEE-HACIAL WORK 
Presented Before the Synod of Sewanee by Miss 



WE are considering one of the most vexed 
problems of the day, one on which peopte 
differ greatly and I believe honestly. Just b©= 
cause there is this honest difference of opinion^ 
I think we should try to see what would be the 
Christ's attitude. I know of no incident in the 
Gospels that will give us this more clearly than 
the parable of the Good Samaritan. Jesus chose 
the Samaritans in teaching the lesson of neighbor- 
liness to the Jews, not because the Samaritans 
were more or less the children of God than other 
people, but because they were the ones to whom 
the Jews had the greatest antipathy, and with 
whom they were thrown most often in contact. I 
believe that if He were teaching us that lesson to- 
day He would use the Negro for many of us are 
prejudiced against the Negro and we are thrown 
into almost constant contact with him. The rela- 
tions between the White and the Negro are as 
tense, and as strained today as those between the 
Jew and the Samaritan of Jesus' day. St. Paul al- 
so teaches us this same lesson when he says that 
"in Christ Jesus there is neither Jew nor Greek, 
bond nor free, male nor female for all are one in 
Christ Jesus." Since providence has decreed that 
these two races shall live together as citizens of 
one commonwealth, I think that we who call our- 
selves Christians should pioneer in trying to bring 
about better relations between the two races. 

Our Church has been particularly successful in 
one branch of its work among Negroes, the Ameri- 
can Church Institute for Negroes, but I fear that 
at times some of us as individuals have not been 
as helpful nor as considerate of them as our Mas- 
ter would have us be. There is always a keen 
responsibility in belonging to the group that is 
on top and therefore, we of the white race have a 
keener responsibility and must take the initiative 
in this matter. But we must be careful that we 
do not condescend nor pamper. We must remem- 
ber that we are all God's children and that we 



14 



The Mission Herald 



work together as fellow-members of His family 
for the coming of His Kingdom- What the Negro 
wants and is entitled to is not special concessions 
nor favors but a fair chance and an equal oppor- 
tunity to do his share- He has a right to expect 
us to treat him as any other individual, judging 
the individual by his own life and action, without 
any prejudice because of his color or previous con- 
dition. Racially he has a right to expect recogni- 
tion for the strides his people have made financi- 
ally, intellectually and culturally as well as mor- 
aly in many instances, and he certainly has a right 
to expect justice in our courts and schools. Most 
of us whites desire individually that he shall have 
these things but we do little collectively to see 
that he does have them. 

Fortunately we have an instrument ready to 
hand with which we can help to secure such just- 
ice and equality of opportunity. This is the Com- 
mission on Inter-racial Co-operation with head- 
quarters in Atlanta. A word about its history. 
During the war, all America whether White or 
Negro, was so engrossed in fighting a common 
enemy that there was little or no time for differ- 
ences between them. Both races were united 
against this common enemy as never before. 
200,000 Negro youths were fighting for the flag 
in France alongside our White boys ; others were 
in training, and those at home responded to every 
wartime appeal as generously as any other group 
in proportion to ther means- White people were 
unstinted in their praise of the Negro's loyalty, 
while the Negro, encouraged by the stirring utter- 
ances of President Wilson and the democratic 
ideals of -the war, felt that in the future things 
would not be quite as they had been. He looked 
for more sympathetic understanding, less preju- 
dice and injustice and a fuller guarantee of his 
constitutional right of "life, liberty and the pur- 
suit of happiness". Race antagonism was for- 
gotten in devotion to a common cause, and one can 
but wonder why the common cause of the Cross 
cannot elicit such devotion and forgetfulness of 
racial antagonism as did the common cause of the 
flag. 

Shortly after the Armistice one might have ob- 
served a subtle but ominous change. Distrust 
was abroad. What would be the attitude of the 
Negro troops when they returned from France? 
Incendiary rumors filled the air and by the time 
the soldiers began to return, fear and suspicion 
had taken deep hold upon both races. In city 
after city, race riots occurred with casualties on 
both sides. The tension tightened everywhere 
and the nation awaited the outcome with dread 
suspense- It was in this crisis in 1919 that the 



Commission on Inter-racial Co-operation came in- 
to existence. Oppressed with the ominous possi- 
bilities of the situation, a small group of Southern 
leaders met day after day in Atlanta, earnestly 
seeking some means of averting the threatened 
calamity by bringing to the front the constructive 
Christian leadership of both races. Commissions 
were formed in various Southern states. No phase 
of the work has been more notable than the en- 
listment of Southern womanhood. In nearly every 
state, a group of women in positions of leadership 
and influence has been organized to co-operate 
with the state Commission and to promote efforts 
along inter-racial lines in their respective civic 
and religious organizations. In every case these 
women have outspoken against mob violence and 
in favor of even handed justice for the Negro, 
particularly in matters affecting the welfare of 
women and children. 

So today we are asking you to do your bit in 
helping to solve this vexed question. We haven't 
the time now to discuss concrete cases, but we are 
trying to make you realize, as never before, our 
responsibility as White Christian women, for the 
treatment that Negroes receive in many of our 
Southern communities. 

The Committee on Inter-racial Co-operation is 
a movement rather than an organization- It aims 
to bring about better understanding, justice and 
fair dealing between the white and colored races. 
Its philosophy is not that of seeking to solve the 
race problem, but simply taking the next steep 
in the direction of the inter-racial justice and good 
will, and our greatest contribution will be in the 
creation of public opinion. We do not want to 
add to your machinery but want you to throw 
your Christian influence into your community. If 
you have an Inter-racial Commission, work with 
it, if not try to see that one is formed with re- 
presentatives of as many comtmunions as possible. 
In union there is strength. What we are asking 
is the education of public opinion and the crea- 
tion of an atmosphere in which all shall secure 
justice and appreciation, regardless of the color of 
one's skin. Just as no chain is stronger than its 
weakest link, so no member of any community is 
safer than the rest of the community. 

I urge each one of us to interest herself in this 
work because we believe it is our Master's will 
that as children of a common Father, redeemed 
by a common Savior and guided by a common Holy 
Spirit we shall find the solution of this question by 
working together. St- Paul again gives us somt 
wholesome advice, helpful to both races, but per- 
haps we white people need it more in this case 
than our Negro friends. He tells the Romans., 



January, 1931 



L5 



and might equally as well tell us, "Not to think 
more highly of himself than he ought to think. 
Be kindly aff ectioned one to another with brother- 
ly love. If it be possible, as much as in you lieth, 
live peacably with all men." 

* * * 

LAMBETH RESOLUTIONS 

(Continued from, last month) 

RACE 

WE affirm that the principle of trusteeship as laid 
down by Article XXII of the League of Nations 
Covenant, cannot be duly applied in practice without full 
recognition of the fact that partnership must eventually 
follow as soon as two races can show an equal standard 
of civilization Accordingly, we affirm that the ruling of 
one race by another can only be justified from the Chris- 
tian standpoint when the highest welfare of the subject 
race is the constant aim of government, and when ad- 
mission to an increasing share in the government of the 
country is an objective steadfastly pursued. To this end 
equal opportunity and impartial justice must be assured; 
equal opportunity of development will result where the 
nation faithfully discharges its responsibility for the edu- 
cation of all its citizens, in which the coooperation of 
both the church and the family with the State is essen- 
tial; and Christian principles demand that equal justice 
be assured to every member of every community both from 
the government and in the courts of law. 

The conference affirms its conviction that all communi- 
cants without distinction of race or color should have 
access in any church to the Holy Table of the Lord, and 
that no one should be excluded from worship in any 
church on account of color or race. Further, it urges that 
where, owing to diversity of language or custom Chris- 
tians of different races normally worship apart, special 
occasions should be sought for united service and cor- 
porate communion in order to witness to the unity of the 
Body of Christ. 

The conference would remind all Christian people that 
the ministrations of the clergy should never be rejected 
on grounds of color or race, and in this connection it 
would state its opinion that in the interests of true unity 
it is undesirable that in any given area there should be 
two or more Bishops of the same communion exercising 
independent jurisdiction. 

The Conference affirms that the guilding principle of 
race relations should be inter-dependence and not com- 
petition, though this inter-dependence does not of itself 
involve inter-marriage; that the realization in practice 
of human brotherhood postulates courtesy on the part of 
all races towards each other, co-operation in the study of 
racial relations and values, and a complete avoidance of 
any exploitation of the weaker races, such as is exempli- 
fied in the liquor traffic among the natives of Africa and 
enforced labor for private profit. The conference urges 
that the presence ' of Asiatic and African students at 
western universities affords an opportunity of promoting 
friendliness between different races, and asks that Chris- 
tians should try to create such a public sentiment that 
these students may be received with sympathetic under- 
standing and enabled to share in that which is best in 
Western social life. 

(4) We would insist that the maintenance of the 
Christian obligation on the part of men to respect and 
honor womanhood involving the equally chivalarous treat- 



ment of national policy in their relations with one an- 
versely the Christian obligation on the part of the 
women to maintain a high standard of morals and con- 
duct, especially in their relations with men of different 
color is equally fundamental. 

[I. 

PEACE AND WAR 

We affirm that war as a method of settling international 
disputes is incompatible with the teaching and example 
of Our Lord Jesus Christ. 

We welcome the agreement made by leading states- 
men of the world in the names of their respective peoples, 
in which they condemn recourse to war for the solution 
of international controversies, renounce it as an instru- 
ment of national policy in thei rrelations with one an- 
other and agree that the settlement of all disputes which 
may arise among them shall never be sought except by 
pacific means; and we appeal to all Christian people to 
support this agreement to the utmost of their power and 
to help actively, by prayer and effort, agencies (such as 
the League of Nations Union and the World Alliance for 
Promoting International Friendship through the 
churches) which are working to promote goodwill among 
the nations. 

We hold that the Christian Church in every nation 
should refuse to countenance any war between nations 
solemnly bound by Treaty, Covenant or Pact for the 
pacific settlement of international disputes, in regard to 
which the government of its own country has not declared 
its willingness to submit the matter in dispute to arbitra- 
tion or conciliation. 

We believe that the existence of armaments on the 
present scale amongst the nations of the world endangers 
the maintenance of peace, and we appeal for a determined 
effort to secure further reduction by international agree- 
ment. 

We believe that peace will never be achieved, till inter 
national relations are controlled by religious and ehticai 
standards, and that tthe moral judgment of humanity 
needs to be enlisted on the side of peace, and we therefore 
appeal to the religious leaders of all nations to give their 
support to the effort to promote those ideals of peace, 
brotherhood and justice for which the League of 
Nations stands. 

Believing that peace within the nation and among the 
nations is bound up with the acceptance of Christian 
principle in the ordering of social and industrial life, we 
re-affirm the resolutions (73-80) of the Lambeth Confer 
ence of 1920, which deal with that subject. While there 
is in many countries an increasing desire for justice and 
therefore a growing will to peace, we are still faced with 
grave social and economic evils which are an offense to 
the Christian conscience, and a menace to the peace of the 
world. All these evils call for the best scientific treatment, 
on international lines, and also for a practical applica- 
tion of the principe of united service and self-sacrifice on 
the part of all Christian people. 

We recognize with thankfulness the efforts made by the 
League of Nations to control the drug traffic, and call 
upon all Christian people to pray and to labor as they have 
opportunity that measures may soon be devised, both by 
national and international action, which will effectively 
limit the production, manufacture and sale of dangerous 
drugs, particularly opium, cocaine and their derivatives, 
to the amounts required for scientific and medical purpose, 
(Continued next month) 



16 



Hie Mission HermM 



VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL 
SCHOOL 

LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA 

Prepares boys at cost for College and University. 
Modern equipment. Healthy location in the moun- 
tains of Virginia. Cost moderate, made possible 
through generosity of founders. For Catalogue, 
apply to 

REV WM. G. PENDLETON, Rector 



CHURCH VESTMENTS | 

Cassocks, Surplices, Stoles f 

Embroideries, Clerical Suits. Silks £ 

Cloths, Fringes X 

% 

HATS, RABATS. COLLARS .*. 




Cox Sons 8l Viningr 

131-133 East 23rd Street 



NEW YORK i 



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CHURCH FURNISHINGS 




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Lv, 12:15 P. M.— -Raleigh, New Bern, Goldsboro, 

Beaufort a n d intermediate 

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Beaufort, Charlotte, Fayette- 

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Sleeper to Raleigh and New 

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For further information, reservations, etc.. ap- 
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J. H. TUCKER, Ticket Agent, 



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SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL AND 
JUNIOR COLLEGE | 

Raleigh, North Carolina : 



An Episcopal School for girls — Have your daugter 
receive her education in a church school. 

Rev. Warren W. Way, A.M., D.D., Rector 

Saint Mary's offers 4 years' High School and 3 
years' College work all fully accredited by the South- 
ern Association. Also courses in Music, Art. Ex- 
pression, Home Economics, and Business. 

20-Acre Campus. Gym and Field Sports. Tennis. 
Indoor Tiled Swimming Pool. Horseback Riding. 

For Catalogue and View Book, address 

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Library U. of N. C 
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3felmutrtj t 1931 




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The Mission Herald 



FEBRUARY 1931 INDEX 

Page 

Albemarle News 2 

Miss Griffin Sails .. • 2 

From St. Mary's, Kinston _._ 2 

From St. Augustine's, Kinston 2 

Bishop's Convention Address 3 

Report, State of the Church 5 

Resolution of Convention . 6 

Lent 6 

Editorials 8 

The Isolated __ 8 

Conference at Sewanee 9 

B. S. A. Assembly 9 

Bishop's Letter to Children 11 

Tribute to Dr. Whitfield 11 

Woman's Auxiliary — 

Annual Meeting . 11 

Report Nominating Committe . 12 

Report on Advance Work 12 

News from Student Center 14 

Lambeth Conference 15 

*- # * 

ALBEMARLE NEWS 

Miss Angy Manning Taylor will teach the Gos- 
pel according to St. John in Christ Church, Eliz- 
abeth City, parish house, beginning March 9th 
through the 13th. 

All the women of the churches in the Albemarle 
are cordially invited to atttend this class — nay, 
are urged to attend. 

Miss Taylor of Chicago, is one of America's 
greatest Bible teachers and this opportunity, once 
in a life time, should not be missed by any Church 
woman north of the Albemarle Sound. 

The following paragraphs are to the point: 

Newspaper Articles 

"It is with much pleasure that I write to you 
about Miss Angy Manning Taylor, who has been 
with us, giving Bible lessons each day for two 
weeks. I had the privilege of attending all her 
meetings, and can say without hesitation that 
never before had I heard a more lucid, intellectual, 
and spiritual exposition of the Bible. 

Miss Taylor is a finished teacher possessing 
the mind of Christ which radiates through her to 
all with whom she comes in contact. To hear her 
is an insipiration, to know her is a benediction. 
She leaves a blessing behind her, and all who have 
heard her look forward with pleasure to her re- 
turn visit." 

Texarkana, Texas. 
# 

"I have not the words to express to you the 
profound impression that is being made upon our 



city. You know Miss Taylor's wonderful gifts and 
power so of these things I need not speak I con- 
sider that the meetings now being held are the 
most wonderful and far reaching that have ever 
been held in Richmond. Each afternoon she has 
spoken to between 500 and 600 women, and so 
profound is the interest that she has been urged 
to continue her meetings through next week at 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church." 

— Richmond, Va. 

* # * 

MISS GRIFFIN SAILS 

MISS ELIZABETH GRIFFIN of New Bern, 
will sail, February 28th, on the Empress of 
Japan, with Deaconess Shaw from Vancouver for 
her new post as secretary to the Bishop of the 
Philippines. She expects to reach Manila about 
March 23rd. 

-* * * 

FROM ST. MARY'S KINSTON 

FROM Sunday, January 25th to Friday, Janu- 
ary 30, Miss Annie Morton Stout, of Mem- 
phis, Tenn., Educational Secretary of the Prov- 
ince of Sewanee, conducted a most successful and 
helpful Teacher-Training Course for the teachers 
of St. Mary's Church School, Kinston, N. C. Miss 
Stout is an expert on the Christian Nurture Se- 
ries, now being very generally used in the Church. 
Her lectures, which were well attended and most 
interesting, afforded encouragement and inspira- 
tion to all who were privileged to attend this 
institute. 

The vestry of St. Mary's Parish, Kinston, was 
recently organized with the election of Mr. D. F. 
Wooten, as Senior Warden; Mr. T. H. Harvey, as 
Junior Warden, and Mr P. R. Hamlin as Clerk. 
The principle of rotation in the Vestry was ap- 
plied in the recent election held in this parish, 
with the result that five new vestrymen are on 

the Vestry this year. 

* # -x- 

FROM ST. AUGUSTINE'S, KINSTON 

OSCAR E. Holder, a Candidate for Holy Orders 
in this Diocese, at present in his second year 
studies at the Philadelphia Divinity School, spent 
the Christmas season with his parents in Kin- 
ston, the Rev. and Mrs. Jas. E. Holder, and con- 
ducted the services there, at St Augustine's Mis- 
sion, during the absence of his father. As a 
student at Lincoln University, Pa., where he grad- 
uated two years ago, he showed superior excel- 
lence in Greek, and while an undergraduate, was 
employed there as instructor of the higher Greek 
class. He is taking the study of Hebrew at the 
Divinity School, a subject which most students 
avoid or "pass up." 



The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, FEBRUARY, 1931 



No. 2 



'The Bishop s Annual Convention Address 

Delivered In St. Paul's Church, Greenville, January 28th, 1931 



Brethren of the Clergy and Laity of the Diocese 

of East Carolina : 

"Grace be unto you, and peace from God, our 
Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ." 

We are meeting today in a time of unrest, con- 
fusion and fear, and I pray that God, the Holy 
Ghost, may guide us in our deliberations and in- 
spire us with His wisdom that we may be enabled 
to carry back to our people a message so compell- 
ing in its courage, and so unfaltering in its faith, 
that the whole Diocese may respond with renewed 
consecration to the call of Christ and His Church. 

As we look back over the past year, we find 
many reasons for real encouragement. The Con- 
firmations have been larger than for many years ; 
the Clergy generally have never served more 
faithfully ; and the Laity, in many instances, have 
displayed real sacrificial devotion in their loyalty 
to the Church and its Program. 

Our people generally have suffered materially; 
many of them have felt the pinch of genuine 
poverty, and have had to make real sacrifices, 
involving the disruption of cherished plans for 
themselves and for their children. 

And yet, in spite of this wide-spread condition, 
yes, perhaps because of this condition, I have seen 
a deepening of the spiritual life of this people such 
as I have not seen before during the sixteen years 
in which I have been permitted to serve you. 

We have seen the crashing of financial institu- 
tions in which we trusted. We have heard the 
tramp of thousands of our unemployed brothers 
seeking a chance to live. We have seen the toil 
of the farmer come to naught, and we have sensed 
the deep silence of our closed factories and mills. 
We have had to face stark realities, and some of 
us, I believe, have made a fresh discovery of God. 

It has been a time to try men's souls, and I be- 
lieve we have needed such a time, a testing time, 
when men, shaken from false security and transi- 
ent content, fall back upon God and find peace. 

The easy days, so sadly abused, so wantony 
squandered, are gone, and the very salvation of 
America may depend upon the length of time 
they remain away. 



The hard days are here — the days of planning 
and thinking and giving up, the days of readjust- 
ment of living and restoration of values and dis- 
covery of self. These days are here — may we 
have the courage to thank God for them ; may we 
have the wisdom to use them, not as valleys of 
depressions through which we toil in bitterness 
and defeat, but as God's own highways, over 
which we march in confidence and faith to that 
larger life of service, that wider field of usefulness 
that we could have never known if we had not 
learned the lesson of the hard high road. 

At such a time as this, we should pause and take 
stock of our resources. We should ask ourselves : 
Have I been living in a fool's paradise? Have I 
been depending upon temporary, transient resour- 
ces? Have I anything left upon which to build 
my life? 

Such an examination, honestly made, should 
lead us to a realization of the truth that we have 
lost nothing that is permanent, nothing that 
makes for character, nothing that could possibly 
endure for one moment after the breath leaves 
our body ; and that we still have the possibility of 
possessing all things that make for the splendor 
of our manhood and the winning of our souls. 

We still have God. We have our Master, Christ. 
We have membership in His body, the Church. 
We have our task, and we have the certainty of 
victory, through Faith. 

In a recent issue of a financial pamphlet, I read 
these words: "These times test men's courage, 
and they test faith more than courage. 

There is such a thing as being fool-hardy and 
calling it courage; but experience shows that our 
peril is the lack of faith. 

It would seem as though some social leaders 
have no faith in America, and some Church lead- 
ers have no faith in God. A defeatist attitude 
denominates most enterprises for the well-being 
of society and the advancement of the Kingdom 
of God. We are in retreat. The challenge of the 
sacrificial has been lost in coping with emergen- 
cies. 

Reductions, Curtailments, Cuts, Discarded Pro- 



The Mission Herald 



grams, Abandoned Fields, Surrender, Retreat. 
These are the prevailing attitudes. Faith has 
crumpled. Men charged with great programs are 
panic stricken. They have lost their nerve. 

Courage, Love, Spiritual Passion, Sacrifice, Re- 
ligious Fervor, Service, Generosity. The sense of 
immediacy, the sense o f Opportunity, Faith. 
These are the qualifications for a time like this." 

God send us faith. God send us courage to 
thank Him for permitting us to live and labor in 
such a time as this. 

At such a time as this, we take notice of our 
foundations, we dwell on the glory of our heri- 
tage; our minds swing back to the beginnings of 
this mighty organism, of which we are living 
members, the Church of the Living God. 

We see a little band of men and women gather- 
ed in an upper room in Jerusalem. We wait with 
them as they wait for the Promised Power. We 
see them going out from that little corner of the 
world in response to the marching orders of their 
Master. We see them go without material equip- 
ment, without influence or earthly power. We 
see them in complete and glad surrender to the 
will of God, in absolute loyalty to Christ, in utter 
self-forgetfulness, going forth against kingdoms 
of selfishness and lust and greed and sin, and we 
see them winning those kingdoms and transform- 
ing them into the kingdoms of our Lord and of 
His Christ. 

We speak of our sufferings, our little self de- 
nials, our inability to maintain our luxuries. God 
pity us for our pettiness. They thanked God that 
they were permitted to suffer for His sake, and 
even in awful flame of martydom they lifted their 
radiant faces to the throne of God and cried out 
their triumphant death song "Thy Kingdom come, 
Thy will be done on earth." 

At such a time as this, God is leading His 
Church back to the meaning of the Cross, so that 
it may learn again the glory of its mission; so 
that from the lesson of that Cross, it may march 
forward with fresh faith and passionate devotion 
to join forces with that lonely leader, Christ, who 
has been waiting so long for us to come. 

At such a time as this we must take stock of 
our environment and make a survey of the con- 
ditions of our day. It does not require the skill 
of a keen student of human affairs to realize that 
conditions in our world are far from normal. Un- 
rest and rebellion characterize a large section of 
the world ; hate and fear permeate human society. 
China has her revolutions. Russia and her radi- 
cal experiments are no longer distant disturbing 
movements to which we give casual, curious at- 
tention from time to time. Industrial revolution 
lifts its head in our own State and Nation, and 



radical influence find their way more and more in- 
to the very life of our working people. In a recent 
article written by my friend, Joseph Fort Newton, 
he said: 

"As the Russian repudiation of religion may 
help to renew our faith, so the up-rooting of hu- 
manity in economic and social affairs may force 
us to put our own house in order. It is not simply 
a polemic, but a portent, and if it looks at first 
like the idealism of hell, to ignore it is folly. 

It does turn the search light on features of our 
own economic system which are ghastly in their 
injustice and brutal in their exploitation of man 
by man. It shows, as in a horrible apocalypse, 
that our selfish, individualistic commercialism, so 
ready to use men to make money for private gain 
and luxurious display, instead of using money to 
make men, is nothing but organized atheism. It 
is not only unchristian, it is inhuman. 

Surely, we now know that no society has any 
secure future but that in which the people, all 
together, learn to cooperate as part of a common 
life for the common good. Our hope lies in a 
practical fraternal righteousness, in which the 
skill of science is employed to serve the masses of 
mankind. In short, our religion must first do 
justly, then love mercy, if it is to lead men to 
walk humbly with God." 

We must realize that our house is not in order. 
With far more than half of the people in this great 
nation outside of any form of organized religion, 
with half of the people of this State owing no 
allegiance to any branch of God's Church. With 
an increasing disregard of law on the part of re- 
spectable citizens, with the appalling increase of 
crime among youth, with the breaking down of 
the standard of decency in human relations, we 
must know that our house is not in order, and 
that the Kingdom of God on earth is still an elu- 
sive hope. 

In our own Diocese, we see the need for a more 
compelling faith and finer measure of sacrificial 
devotion on the part of our people. We have held 
our own. We have pushed forward the bound- 
aries of the Kingdom a little bit here and there, 
but we must admit, in shame and humility, that 
we have failed to win any great objectives for 
Christ and His Churchi From the ignorant and 
the sinning, from the forgotten and the neglected, 
from the tenant farmer and the pale children of 
the mill village, the call is coming for our leader- 
ship, our loving sympathy, our Christ-like devo- 
tion to those for whom, He died. 

"He loved me, and He gave Himself for me" 
cried St. Paul out of the fulness of his grateful 
heart, as, in absolute surrender, he gave himself 
to the mighty work to which he had been devinely 



February. 1931 



5 



called. The same blessed assurance should send 
us out to-day, determined, at whatever cost, to 
play our full joyful part in carrying that blessed 
message to the heart of a weary, waiting world. 

In the days of our prosperity, we gave, without 
joy and without sacrifice, to the support of the 
Church and the spread of the Kingdom of Christ, 
and because so many of us gave without this sense 
of privilege, the act was not sacramiental, and, 
therefore, easily abandoned when prosperity ceas- 
ed. Because our meat was not to do the will of 
God, we were hungry, even in our prosperity and 
miserable in our poverty. 

Admitting our failures, we will not admit de- 
feat ; conscious of our poverty of soul, we will not 
refuse to be fed; unworthy of our Sonship, we 
will not give up our heritage. We will, please 
God, go on from this place with courage and with 
faith to accomplish the work committed to our 
hands. We will clear from our souls those barri- 
ers that have blocked the way of Jesus. We will 
offer and present ourselves to His service. Out 
of our plenty, we have given with indifference; 
out of our poverty, we will offer with joy. We 
will face the problems of our day with under- 
standing hearts, and give to a perplexed and dis- 
tressed people that leadership which will enable 
them to find God, and in finding Him, to find peace. 

Surely we can say with a measure of confidence 
and joy that we have come to the Kingdom for 
such a time as this, a time of danger and opportu- 
nity and high privilege, a time for the testing of 
souls. It is no time for superficialities, no time 
for surface contacts, but it is a time when Clergy 
and Laity alike must so deepen their faith and 
renew their courage that they may be enabled 
to show men and women that the only way out 
is the way of the Cross. It is not the easy way, 
but it is the only way ; it is not the way the weak- 
ling would choose, but it is the way to victory. 

"Whatsoever is born of God overcometh the 
world, and this is the victory that overcometh the 
world, even our faith." 

God give us faith to overcome our fears, our 
prejudices, and our sins. God give us faith to 
see and understand His plans. God give us faith 
to know and appreciate the power that belongs to 
His sons. God give us a vision of the world's 
need and a passion for the souls of men, for 

"The great world's heart is aching, aching fiercely 

in the night, 
And God alone can heal it, and God alone give 

light ; 
And the men to bear that message, and to speak 

the living word, 



Are you and I, my brothers, and the millions that 
have heard. 

Can we close our eyes to duty? Can we fold our 
hands at ease, 

While the gates of night stand open to the path- 
ways of the seas? 

Can we shut up our compassions? Can we leave 
our prayer unsaid, 

Till the lands which Hell has blasted have quick- 
ened from the dead? 

We grovel among trifles and our spirits fret and 
toss, 

While above us burns the vision of the Christ up- 
on the Cross; 

And the blood of God is streaming from His brok- 
en hands and side, 

And the lips of God are saying "Tell my brothers 
I have died." 

Voice of God, we hear Thee above the shocks 

of time, 
Thine echoes roll around us, and the message is 

sublime; 
No power of man shall thwart us, no stronghold 

shall dismay, 
When God commands obedience and love has led 

the way." 

* * $ 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE 
STATE OF THE CHURCH 

YOUR Committee is unable to make an accurate 
report on the State of the Church for the 
year just past, for the simple reason that, on the 
opening day of the Convention sixteen parishes 
and missions of the Diocese had failed to send to 
the Secretary the parochial reports asked for by 
January 15th. Now that the Convention of the 
Diocese is meeting in the month of January in- 
stead of in May, your Committee feels that an ad- 
ded effort should be made by every parish and 
mission in the Diocese to send these reports to the 
Secretary by January 15th of each year. 

In order to determine progress made during 
the year we discovered from the Reports of the 
General Church out of 27 Dioceses with communi- 
cants numbering from six to eight thousand, and 
with clergy numbering from 25 to 40, East Caro- 
lina stood at the top. Only two of these 27 Dio- 
ceses had as many confirmations as East Carolina 
had during the year 1930, and in both cases the 
numerical strength of these Dioceses exceeded 
that of East Carolina. It is also interesting to 
note that in both cases the Contributions were 
more than $70,000.00 less than the contributions 



The Mission Herald 



of the people of the Diocese of East Carolina. 

Another interesting- fact is that while the total 
number of confirmations in the General Church 
for the past two years has been about 3% of the 
total number of communicants, the number of 
confirmations in the Diocese of East Carolina has 
been more than 5% of the total number of com- 
municants reported by the parishes and missions 
of the Diocese. 

Your Committee agrees with our Bishop when 
he says in his Annual Address that "these are 
testing times." We earnestly believe that if each 
parish and mission carries out the full program of 
the Church as adopted by the Convention, especi- 
ally the recommendations from the Executive 
Council and the Commission on Evangelism, East 
Carolina can look forward to 1931 with the assur- 
ance of greater progress in the service of God and 
in the Kingdom of His Christ. We see signs of 
this progress in the attendance of the laymen of 
the Diocese at this Convention. In the words of 
our Bishop, "for this we thank God and take cour- 
age." 

STEPHEN GARDNER, 

Chairman. 
* * * 

IMPORTANT RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY 
DIOCESAN CONVENTION 

WHEREAS, the Budget of Appropriations of 
$46,248.00 for the General and Diocesan 
Work, to be derived from parishes and missions, 
exceed the amount to be reasonably expected from 
that source by the sum of $5,000.00, or 10% ; 
BE IT RESOLVED : 

1. That the Woman's Auxiliary be asked to 
assume the leadership in raising the balance of 
the amount accepted by the Diocese for the Ad- 
vance Work Program, amounting to $2,300.00, it 
being understood that they shall have access to 
all the people of the Diocese in their effort to meet 
this responsibility; 

2. That special emphasis be placed this Lent 
upon the obligation of the people for General Mis- 
sions, and that the self-denial offerings of the 
people during Lent through the Mite Boxes of the 
Church Schools or through the Easter offerings 
be devoted wholly, wherever possible, or in part 
to the paying the apportionment of $13,000.00 to 
the General Church; 

3. That a special committee be appointed by 
the Bishop which either themselves, or through 
their agents, shall solicit special gifts from a list 
of persons whose names shall be obtained from 
their Rectors or otherwise, such persons being 
those who seem best able to respond to such an 
appeal; this appeal to be made between now and 



July 1st, in the interest of raising the sum of 
$5,000.00 necessary to prevent a reduction of our 
budget for the year by that amount. 

4. That failing to secure such an amount 
through the Lent and Easter offerings and special 
gifts by the first of July next, the Executive Coun- 
cil be authorized and directed to reduce the pres- 
ent budget of $46,248.00 by an amount equal to 
the difference between the budget and the amount 
reasonably to be expected from Parishes and Mis- 
sions, plus the amount received from the sources 
above mentioned. 

* * * 



Lent 



Geo. F. Hill 

BEFORE the third century Lent was observed 
only during the last two days of Holy Week, 
but soon grew to include the whole week. The 
Council of Nicea, 325, recognized a forty day ob- 
servance of Lent as the Universal custom. The 
forty days custom was adopted in commemoration 
of the forty day fast of Christ. In the early Churc, 
penitence was the primary idea of Lent and fast- 
ing was wholly incidental. In the Mediaeval 
Church fasting became very strict until the even- 
ing of each day. Gradual relaxations were per- 
mitted until now the fast of Lent is more nominal 
than real. 

The meaning of Lent TODAY, however, is of 
more importance to us than knowledge of its his- 
tory. What does Lent mean today? If briefly 
stated, but inadequately explained, it is a time set 
apart for whole hearted soul strengthening; a time 
for special emphasis on the deepening of one's 
whole spiritual life. 

The Episcopal Church has never practiced the 
emotional type of revival. Experience has proved 
that a quiet acceptance of Christ by study, prayer 
and practice is more beneficial, real and lasting 
than when one is swayed by a momentary emotion. 
By the former one's whole being, body, mind and 
spirit, is influenced; by the latter generally only 
the emotion is touched. 

But why, you may ask, does the Church stress 
this sort of spiritual deepening but for forty days ? 
Should it not be stressed throughout the whole 
year? It is like the inventory of a business which 
is taken, nut all the year, but usually once a year, 
the results from which is to benefit the business 
throughout the year. Special conferences are held 
at stated times in all businesses and professions. 
These conferences teach new things, bring greater 
power for the whole year. 

Throughout the year, outside of Lent, your at- 
tention is divided among many things and your 



February, 1931 



time is allotted to them. During Lent you are ex- 
pected to cease from all social activities and all 
other activities possible that do not work directly 
for the strengthening of your spiritual life. But 
in giving up these various activities it is done for 
the sole purpose of using the time and result gain- 
ed for the deepening of your religious life. You 
do not give up the theatre during Lent because 
theatre going is wrong, but because you want to 
clear your life during Lent of all less important 
activities in favor of the all important cultivation 
of your acquaintance with God. Before your 
brothers and sons went to the battle field during 
the World War they first went to a training camp 
in order that by strict and careful training they 
would be the better enabled to fight victoriously. 
Lent is such a camp for the Christian. 

The Church does not draft you for camp. You 
may accept or refuse the training. The Church 
suggests methods but imposes Lent on no one. It 
is within your gift of freedom of choice to pick 
weeds or lilies. To do nothing, however, during 
Lent is wasted time. It is like a ride on the 
merry-go-round. It may be amusing or boresome 
for the time being but in either case you are get- 
ting no where. Lent is conceived for the purpose 
of helping you onward and upward. 

The Church suggests a few methods for your 
training in camp. Try one at a time, then in- 
crease the number, and before Easter dawns see 
that every suggestion has been accepted and acted 
upon wholeheartedly. The list below perhaps does 
not incude many things that meet your own pe- 
culiar needs. Add them. Use them. 
Worship 

1. Attend every service. And while attending 
keep strict guard upon your mind that it does not 
wander. See that every word of the service and 
every act, mean something real to you. Do noth- 
ing from habit; sing thoughts, not tunes. If, at 
the close of the service, a single versicle meant 
nothing to you, you failed in the service by losing 
an essential part. Practice to lose nothing. Only 
practice and concentration will teach you to wor- 
ship. 

Bible Reading 

2. Read the Bible. Reading the Bible will do 
you little good unless you do it for a specific pur- 
pose. Your purpose is to get from it a benefit to 
yourself. To do this you must read slowly with 
great concentration. Think while you read about 
how it applies to you. See if you can fit the cir- 
cumstances to yourself. Wonder what you would 
have done under the circumstances. Digest each 
thought before going to the next. If you cannot 
understand what you read look it up in a commen- 



tary or ask some one who knows. Read regularly 
— not when other tl ings are out of the way but 
make your Bible reading a very important activity 
of the day. 

Prayer 

3. Pray. Make prayer a very important part 
of your daily life. Not when all else is out of the 
way, but make it second to none in importance. 
Keep your prayer appointments with God if every- 
thing else is left undone. Pray not by mere re- 
pitition of memjorized words, but slowly, thought- 
fully and seriously. Do not make your prayer ap- 
pointments mere times for begging. Talk over 
everything. Without speaking often, imagine that 
Jesus, just as He appears to your imagination, is 
sitting now before you, in that other chair. Think 
that you can reach out and touch Him. Talk with 
Him. Do not hurry through your prayers. Take 
plenty of time. Jesus often spent whole nights 
in prayer. It may be hard at first but soon it will 
become real joy to pray at length. All through 
the day think of Jesus wherever you are. Think 
that He is with you, by your side and listens to all 
you say, think and hear, and sees all you do and 
all you see. Pray definitely. Be specific. Be 
real. Pray for your friends, naming them. Pray 
for those unfriendly to you, naming them. Pray 
for the vestry, the rector, choir, organizations and 
congregation. Pray for the Christian forces of 
the city, mentioning them. Pray for those in au- 
thority — judges, etc. Pray for missionaries, nam- 
ing them. Pray by name. Have a list and use 
certain names today, others tomorrow and — stick 
to it. 

Evangelism 

4. Bring others to service with you. Interest 
others in the Church worship. Go out of your 
way to get them. Don't ask at random some one 
you happen to meet. There are Episcopalians who 
have not attended a service in years. Go after 
some of them. To stop after the first or second 
failure is cowardice. When you bring them help 
them to find what it is to worship in spirit and 
in truth. 

Religious Conversations 

5. Each day make it a purpose to engage some 
one in conversation about religion or prayer. 
Never controversially, but religiously. Converse 
on those things wherein you agree. Make your 
conversations spiritually helpful. Do not argue. 

Enemies 

6. Visit and make friends with those you do 
not like and those who do not like you. Try ear- 
nestly to see their good qualities, for they have 
them, and if you'll be Christian and open minded 

Continued on Page Nine 



The Mission Herald 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription §1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor 

REV. GEORGE F. HILL 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Contributing Editors 

RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 

MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 

Advertising rates furnished on application. 

Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent per word. 

Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Aianager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. 

* * * 

DIOCESAN CONVENTON 

THE RECENT diocesan convention was one of 
the most interesting and helpful held in many 
years. 

It was particularly intteresting in that we met 
in a new Church and parish house, beautiful, 
churchly and practical. We congratulate the good 
people of St. Paul's on their plant 

Again, it was especially interesting because this 
was the first diocesan convention held at Green- 
ville since 1890. The Greenville people showed 
what real southern hospitality is at its best. 

There was present an excellent representation 
of the laity. One mint suppose that inasmuch as 
times are hard, and so many parishes and mis- 
sions failed to meet their quota, that it would find 
many of our people staying home rather than face 
the issue. This of course, proved not tto be the 
case. Loyalty tto the Church was evident on 
every hand Conscientious thought was given 
every problem, and with such loyalty and conse- 
cration manifested everywhere the Church may 
face the future unafraid. 

* 

BISHOP'S CONVENTION ADDRESS 

INSTEAD of tthe Bishop's address at the Con- 
vention being a report as in other years, he 
gave us, this year, a masterly address on world 
conditions and their cure. This address shows 
true Christian insight and will help every soul 
who may be fearful of the future. 

This address is found in this number of the 



Mission Herald and will also be published in pam- 
phlet form. 

You may have heard the Bishop deliver this ad- 
dress, or you may have heard your rector read it. 
Just the same read it yourself thoughtfully and 
you will find help there for your soul. 

* 

MY SON AND THE WORLD 

CHRISTIAN fathers and mothers who are in- 
terested in seeing that their sons count for 
the most in life, will do well to read the article in 
this issue, "A Conference At Sewanee tto Con- 
sider The Ministry." They shoul dthen pray over 
the mattter, asking God tto guide them in doing 
His Will. 

LENTEN OBJECTIVE 

EVERY parish and mission is urged this Lent 
to stress General Missions. The offerings, it 
is hoped, will at least amount tto $13,000.00 to 
take care of our obligation to the General Church. 
This is a specific goal to the Church Schools and 
people of the diocese. Shall we win the race that 
is set before us? 

* * * 

THE ISOLATED 

THIS IS part of a fairly typical letter from 
among the many received by the secretary for 
Church work among the isolated. It comes from 
a woman in Utah, far from any church, who is 
teaching her children at home, with material sup- 
plied through the national office. 

'Your letter makes us feel we are a part of the 
Church school system. So far we have not missed 
a lesson. We have our lesson at a regular hour 
each Sunday and follow a regular plan, opening 
at the piano, lesson, review, and a story from the 
sentences from the Prayer Book, a hymn or two 
Bible story book. . . If you can find time, I would 
like to know a few of the children's hymns most 
generally used, with tunes. Having been an iso- 
lated member practically all my life, I am not 
very familiar with the Church music" 

* * * 

"There are more Episcopalians in proportion to 
the total population in Green County, Virginia, 
than anywhere else in the entire United States, 
one in every fifteen," says the Virginia Church- 
man. One in 15 is certainly very high. Among 
South Dakota Indians it is about one in 4, and 
among Archdeacon Goodmans four or five hun- 
dred Eskimos in Arctic Alaska, all of whom are 

baptized, more than one in 3 are communicants. 

* * * 

There are villages in Cuba with 2,500 or more 
people without any church of any kind. 



February, 1931 



LENT 

Continued from, Page Seven 

enough you will find them. Make yourself to like 
them and they will like you. 
Honesty 

7. Do nothing by word or deed that reflects on 
anyone's integrity or honesty. Say or think noth- 
ing bad or critical about any one. If you can say 
nothing good about a person — say nothing. It 
is because of an unchristian spirit that keeps one 
from seeing good in other people. It is a mean 
disposition that causes one to speak badly about 
any person. Never permit any one to entice you 
to participate in criticisms. 

Weaknesses 

8. Find out your chief weaknesses or besetting 
sins and by doing their opposites continually, pur- 
posely, doggedly, thereby automatically free your- 
self of them. This may mean for you to fast in 
order to destroy your mastering appetites. This 
may keep you from the theatre in order to destroy 
your conquering passion for pleasure. It may 
mean that you must give away a great deal of your 
money in order to break your inordinate love of 
money. Make a full and conscientious analysis 
of yourself, not as you want to be, but just as you 
are. 

Confession 

9. To some persons confession is a great help. 
If you are one of these go to some real Christian 
man or woman and confess everything to them. 
Talk with them about yourself, your trials, fears 
and doubts. Ask for advice and assistance in 
your spiritual battles. Together in Christian pray- 
er where two or three are gathered together, you 
will find Jesus, and whatsoever you ask will be 
given you. 

LENT MEANS SPECIAL TRAINING 

TO LIVE 

* * * 

A CONFERENCE AT SEWANEE TO 
CONSIDER THE MINISTRY 

Rt. Rev. William G. McDowell, D. D. 

RECENTLY at the Lambeth Conference a group 
of our leaders from over the world gave long 
and serious consideration to the Ministry. They 
agreed that the Church calls for a higher type of 
minister and one better trained than ever before. 
They felt that not enough men of the requisite 
qualities of leadership, imagination and initiative 
are offering themselves. Other vocations are en- 
gaged in a fierce competition for the best in our 
homes and schools. The Ministry is losing out, 
often because its claims are not adequately pre- 
sented to those most worth while. 

And it is easy to understand why. Parental 



ambition is no longer in the direction of the Minis- 
try. Power, wealth, applause, the tangible re- 
wards of a materially minded age make the Min- 
istry seem cheap and unimportant by comparison 
with industry and commerce and their attendant 
professions. Education is largely along so-called 
practical lines that promise more abundant living 
rather than the more abundant life. Research is 
busy with the quantitative rather than the quali- 
tative sciences. Theology is in a transitional stage 
of argument and controversy ; it has not crystaliz- 
ed into a new and definite form that can touch 
the emotions and appeal to the fundamental loy- 
alties. 

In the face of these facts there is all the more 
need for a prophetic Ministry aflame with intense 
and compelling conviction, a Ministry whose gifts 
have received new life from the passionate breath 
of Christ. Men do not seek the Way because they 
like the books that describe it. God uses the con- 
tagious power of a virile, vital Ministry to draw 
men's feet into the King's Highway, where sooner 
or later they must meet the King, 

With all this in mind, a conference to consider 
the Ministry is being arranged at Sewanee for 
Easter Week, April 10-13. College men above the 
freshmen year, carefully chosen for qualities of 
leadership, are being invited to meet some real 
leaders in Christian work and frankly face the 
implications of the Ministry for themselves. This 
is not a meeting for postulants, servers and eccles- 
iastically minded young men. Those who are the 
leaders of the present student generation will be 
challenged to consider the Ministry. Every other 
calling is making a bid for their services ; will they 
not give the Ministry a fair chance to present its 
call? No undue influence will be used; each man 
is expected to reach an intelligent and honest de- 
cision for himself. The purpose is to present 
Christ's call of the Ministry to the vigorous and 
capable, in the firm faith that from among them 
will come a stronger, more effective leadership for 
the Church of tomorrow. 

* * * 

Diocesan Assembly 

BROTHERHOOD OF ST. ANDREW 

GREENVILLE, N. C 

January 27, 1931. 

UNDER the leadership of Mr. C. McD. Davis, 
and the enthusiastic support of Mr. P. H. 
Kasey, the Assembly of the Brotherhood of St. 
Andrew, within less than twelve months, has 
found a definite place in the work of the diocese 
and it seems that it has been raised up at this 
time to be the strong right arm of the clergy in 



10 



The Mission Herald 



meeting the serious problems which now confront 
us. 

In the new parish house of St. Paul's Church, 
Greenville, erected under the sweet and loving 
guidance of our host, the Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, the 
Brotherhood Assembly met at 6:00 P. M., Tues- 
day, January 27, 1931, there being present the 
Bishop, 23 clergymen and 78 laymen, representing 
30 parishes and missions. 

After a delightful supper served by the ladies 
of St. Paul's Church, the Assembly was opened 
with prayer by its Chaplain, the Rev. Alex Miller, 
of St. Paul's Church, Wilmington. In a few gra- 
cious words the visitors were made to feel per- 
fectly at home by the Hon. F. C. Harding, of St. 
Paul's Church, Greenville, who turned the meet- 
ing over to its President, Mr. C. McD. Davis, of 
St. John's Church, Wilmington. 

Mr. Davis briefly outlined the purpose of the 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew and introduced the 
speaker of the evening, Mr. Wm. F. Pelham, 
President of the Wm. F. Pelham Co., Investment 
Brokers of Chicago. Mr. Pelham had come from 
Chicago to East Carolina at his own expense to 
bring to us from the birthplace of the Brother- 
hood of St. Andrew its true meaning in the life of 
the individual, the parish and the church at large. 
He stated that being a true Chicagoan he was tak- 
ing back more than he gave, which is truly one of 
the wonderful privileges of the Brotherhood, and 
in his personal illustrations he clearly brought out 
that wonderful fact that we are doubly repaid im- 
mediately for all we do for the Master. 

In a beautiful tribute to the National President 
of the Brotherhood, Mr. Pelham pointed out that 
all the joy and pleasure that he had received from 
his work in trying to bring his brother to the Lord 
had been taught him by Lawrence Choate. First 
to start with self at home, with our own — how do 
we know that, like St. Andrew, we may be the 
means by which a Peter is brought to his Lord. 
For forty minutes his audience sat enthralled and 
among the definite results of the practical illustra- 
tions of what the Brotherhood means, was the 
statement by one of the rural clergy that he had 
already arranged for eleven men to apply for a 
charter of a Brotherhood Chapter in a rural 
parish. 

The time was too short to secure reports from 
the various chapters represented, but it was clear- 
ly brought out in the after meeting that those 
chapters that had caught the spirit and had be- 
gun to understand the principals of the Brother- 
hood realized the wonderful opportunity it opened 
up, not only in the parish and church at large, 
but in their own lives. 



Our own beloved Bishop, in a manner that could 
only be appraoched by him, picked up the various 
threads of the meeting and wound them into a 
beautiful closing address which filled those pres- 
ent with a desire to go home and stand loyally 
shoulder to shoulder with their rector in putting 
across the church's program so that there should 
go out on July 1st, to the National Church, the 
inspiring message that there would be no back- 
ward step in East Carolina, but that as in the past 
she would "Carry On". 

The following were present: 

Ahoskie, Rev. Leon Malone; Beaufort, Rev. T. 
A Vache; Creswell, Rev. Chas. E. Williams, Mr. 
H. G. Walker; Charlotte, Rev. W. H. Wheeler; 
Chicago, 111., Mr. Wm. F. Pelham; Chapel Hill 
Rev. S. A. Lawrence; Chocowinity. Rev. Sidney 
Matthews; Church Army, Capt. F. Turner; Eden- 
ton, Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D; Elizabeth City, Rev. 
Geo. F. Hill ; Farmville, Messrs. W. E. Malone, D. 
L. Barber, H. C. Cobb, J. C. Gibbs, R. T. Martin, 
H. F. Seigler, J. L. Shackleford ; Fayetteville, Rev. 
Archer Boogher, Messrs. S. W. Tillinghast, J. R. 
Tolar; Goldsboro, Mr. George C. Royall; Green- 
ville, Rev W. A. Lillycrop, Messrs. Billy Brown, 
N. H. Whitehurst, Sr., W. F. Cherry, Linwood 
Jones, Dr. L. C. Skinner, L. E. Hill, Carl L. Adams, 
C. A. Brown, Geo. 0. Britt, J. B. Cummings, Chas. 
A. Carr, W. H. Dail, Jr., Grover C. Davis, R. C. 
Deal, Jack Edwards, E. B. Ferguson, J. C. Gaskins, 
R. H. Gaskins, J. B. Bobbitt, F. C. Harding, John 
L. Hassell, Sr., Paul Hill, John L. Home, Chas. 
P. H. Kasey, R. S. May, Cary B. Mayo, Sr., Tfros. 
J. Moore, P. W. Picklesimer, R. C. Stokes, Jr., John 
W. Warner, Dr. H. M. Bonner, Judge W. A. Dar- 
din; Grifton, Dr. Wm. Whitfield; Kyoto, Japan, 
Rev. J. K. Morris; Kinston, Rev. B. S. Huske, D. 
D., Messrs. Alex. Williams, D. F. Wooten; Lum- 
berton, Rev. Thos. H. Wright, Messrs. J. Q. Beck- 
with, H. D. Ramsuer; Morehead City, Dr. J. G. 
Bell; Plymouth, Mr. A. H. Stier; Raleigh, Rev. W. 
W. Way : Snow Hill, Judge L. V. Morrill ; Washing- 
ton, Rev. Stephen Gardner, Messrs. John H. Bon- 
ner, W. B. Harding, John G. Bragaw; Wilmington, 
St. James Church, Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., Rev. 
I. deL. Brayshaw, Judge George Rountree; Wil- 
mington, Good Shepherd Church, Rev. J. B. Gibble, 
Messrs. C. H. Huband, Joe Newton; Wilmington, 
St. John's Church, Rev. E. W. Halleck, Messrs. C. 
McD. Davis, Troy B. Anderson, T. F. Dardin, J. 
M. James, S. C. Woolvin; Wilmington, St. Paul's 
Church, Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D„ Rev. W. 
R. Noe, Rev. Alex. Miller, Messrs. W. O. Souther- 
land, G. M. M. James, J. L. Hazlehurst, Jr., J. L, 
Hazlehurst, Sr., J. E. L. Wade, J. E. Sloan, C. L, 
Myers, B. W. Dunham, A. T. St. Amand ; William- 
ston, Rev. Arthur H. Marshall ;Windsor, Dr. C. J. 



February, 1931 



11 



Sawyer, Mr. J. B. Cherry; Wrightsville, Rev. F. 
D. Dean, Mr. W. A. Taylor. 

J. Q. BECK WITH, Secretary. 

* # * 

THE BISHOP'S LETTER TO EAST CAROLINA 
CHILDREN 

To my Loyal Helpers, the Children of the Church 

Schools of East Carolina: 
• Once more I have the privilege of calling the 
young people of East Carolina to renewed service 
to Christ and His Church, and I know how loyally 
and enthusiastically you will respond to the call. 
When you were made members of Christ and in- 
heritors of the Kingdom of Heaven in Baptism 
you were signed and sealed as Christ's faithful 
soldiers and servants unto the very end of your 
lives, and many of you in confirmation have ac- 
cepted the Great Commission of our Leader and 
Lord. 

He needs our loyalty and devotion today and we 
can show that loyalty by helping Him to carry 
the message of His love and power ^rto all the 
world. 

We are entering upon another Lenten Season. 
Let us use it as a time to so demonstrate our in- 
terest in the great cause for which our Master 
died on Good Friday, that we may have real reason 
for rejoicing when we celebrate His rising from 
the grave on Easter Day. 

Last year the children of the diocese gave a 
splendid offering through their Mite Boxes and I 
am asking that you make it an even greater offer- 
ing this year. The children of China and Japan 
and Africa and Alaska and Brazil and the islands 
of the sea are holding out their hands to us, ask- 
ing us to come and heal their poor sick bodies, 
asking us to tell them how they may become soldi- 
ers and servants of our Master, Christ. Shall we 
not hear and heed their call ? 

As Commander of that splendid regiment made 
up of the boys and girls of East Carolina, I call 
you to the colors— ATTENTION— MARCH- 
CONQUER YOUR OBJECTIVE— WIN THE VIC- 
TORY FOR CHRIST AND HIS CHURCH. 

I am depending upon you. 

Faithfully and affectionately, 
THOMAS C. DARST 

* * * 

TRIBUTE TO DR. W. C. WHITFIELD 

A FINE TRIBUTE to Dr. William Cobb Whit- 
field was paid by Bishop Thomas C. Darst, 
Sunday afternoon in a talk to the congregation of 
old St. John's Episcopal Church, near here. The 
talk preceded a sermon by the bishop. 

Dr. Whitfield recently came back to Pitt County 
for a visit. He is residing at Salisbury tempor- 
arily owing to his wife's poor health. 



Bishop Darst expressed his pleasure at the ven- 
erable physician's presence in the congregation. 
"He has been missed much from the community. 
I am sure I speak for the whole congregation when 
I say his life has been a benediction to us all. His 
faithful work here, I hope, will not be lost to us 
for long. We all hope that the health of his dear 
wife will soon be restored, and that they may re- 
turn to us and assume their old places in the activ- 
ities of the church in this parish. Their work 
and influence has been outstanding. I am over- 
joyed that Dr. Whitfield is with us today." 

The tribute brought tears to the eyes of many 
in the congregation. Dr. Whitfield is beloved in 
the section. As a physician he ministered to Pitt 
County people 35 years before going to Salisbury. 

— Kinston Free Press. 



5: 



Y Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. 

?. ... i. 

A Publicity Chairman 'jt, 

ANNUAL MEETING 

St. Paul's Church, Greenville, North Carolina 

January 28th, 1931. 

IT has not been a year since our last meeting 
but the intervening months have brought many 
changes and the Diocese as a whole has come face 
to face with many problems and with many ad- 
justments. I have read your reports for happier 
years but I have never felt a keener sense of ap- 
preciation and thankfulness for your splendid 
work than I do to-day. Of course, in some parish- 
es there was little depression felt until late sum- 
mer but in the majority trouble began early in 
the year. In some places Auxiliary funds were 
swept away and you women have courageously be- 
gun again and have duplicated the amounts so that 
your work was not handicapped. No one has ap- 
pealed for a reduction of their apportionment, al- 
though in one parish, some of the organizations 
gave up their Diocesan connections. Although 
the summer work was nothing like what it ha3 
been in the past few years, a great many volun- 
tary additional gifts were made. New work has 
been established in five places which is encourag- 
ing. It has been a real testing time for the wo- 
men of the Auxiliary but it has been the means of 
finding out how deep the responsibility for the 
work is felt. It has been the means of discover- 
ing qualities of leadership which were unknown 
before. It has been through sacrifice that some 
women have grown in devotion and consecration. 
In a year of such national depression, of course, 
there has been discouragement and disappoint- 



12 



The Mueion Herald 



ment, which is only clearly understood by the 
Auxiliaries which have been effected. 

There has been a loss through bank failures of 
some of our United Thank Offering which brings 
to every Auxiliary woman a feeling of great re- 
gret. However, we can look forward to this being 
paid back in part at least in the future. From 
now on, we must keep the Offering foremost in our 
hearts and in our prayers and try to offer in Den- 
ver, an offering which adequately expresses our 
interest in the furthering of the Kingdom of God 
and in our thankfulness for His blessings to us. 

St. Bartholomew's Day is August 27th, and 
many Dioceses will have their final services for 
the Triennium on that day. The Offering will 
close' the first of September, much earlier than 
usual, due to the date of the General Convention. 

The lovliest ministry to poor and disheartened 
people has grown this year from situations in 
which many individuals and communities have 
been forced. I often wish we could arrange our 
meetings so that we could listen to the reports of 
the different societies. I can not resist telling 
you of a group of women whose service has been 
beautiful beyond words. There are others just 
like this one. These women have no luxuries in 
their lives and few comforts but under fine and 
loving leadership, they have forgotten their own 
troubles and problems in their work for people 
whose needs they understand all too well. They 
have answered every call made to them by the 
Auxiliary, they have given voluntary gifts, es- 
pecially to the United Thank Offering and to so- 
cial service work. I must read you first their 
financial report which shows that they have neg- 
lected nothing, although in dollars and cents it 
is not what last year's report was : 

Parish, $66.12; community, $34.30; Diocese, 
$19.00 ; nation, $1.00 ; world, $7.00 ; box to Thomp- 
son Orphanage, $15.00, a total of $141.42. They 
held two Quiet Days. They had a meeting in a 
nearby rural section and intend to organize an 
Auxiliary there. They enabled a woman whose 
husband was paralized and who has five children 
dependant on her to go to the Hospital for an 
operation. She will soon be at work again for her 
family. They attend regularly to the needs of 
another woman who is paralized and whose daugh- 
ter is deaf and dumb. They have undertaken to 
get work for people, they have sent a boy to night 
school and are arranging to get a little moron girl 
into the training school and they closed their re- 
port by saying "these are a few of the things we 
do. Please remember you asked us to write you 
about them." Surely God will bless such service. 

The time has probably come in East Carolina 
when the Auxiliary can do a great deal more for 



the Church by trying to realize the exact situation 
of the parish and mission of which it is a part 
and of its obligations to the work of the Diocese 
and of the whole Church. The leaders have heard 
over and over again that the Auxiliary is pledged 
to see that our parish or mission pays its quota. 
A comparatively few understand that their inter- 
est is required. In 1930 the parishes and mis- 
sions failed to raise their quotas by $8,000.00. 
They made greatly reduced subscriptions for 1931 
which seriously handicaps the work. The Diocese 
faces a situation of increased debt, and every 
member of the Church ought to know about it in 
order that we find ways of remedying the situ- 
ation. Our love and layalty for our Church must 
find the women of East Carolina back of the whole 
program, upholding our Bishop as well as our 
Rectors. Bishop Anderson once used this illus- 
tration of the part the laity play in the church : 

"The part of the Church building which the 
laity occupy is the Nave." The word nave comes 
from navis, a ship. One of the early fathers of 
the Church described the Church as a ship. The 
Bishop was the captain, Priests were under him 
in rank and responsibility. Deacons had their 
assignments. Where did the laity come in ? The 
laity were at the oars. This illustration was used 
long before the days of turbine steamers when 
tiers of oarsmen bent their backs to propel the 
ship through resisting waters. You who live so 
near the ocean must know that a ship cannot be 
steered unless it is in motion. The motion de- 
pends on the people at the oars. The presiding 
Bishop cannot steer the Church if it has no wind 
in its sails and no power in its machinery. The 
Bishop cannot steer the Diocese. The parish priest 
cannot steer the parish unless it is in motion and 
the motion depends on the laity who are in the 
pews, or who ought to be and who have the oars 
in their hands. 

The Diocese still has the Advance Work to com- 
plete before the General Convention. Instead of 
contributing as in former years to a Corporate 
Gift of the women of the Church, we are pledged 
to help with this Gift to Advance Work. We have 
paid $700.00 of the amount, $3,000.00, but it 
.should be the gift of men, women and children. 
Every parish and mission should have a part in 
it. It will be through unselfish giving that the 
Church will be enriched and strengthened. I was 
attracted by this clipping which I pass on to you. 
"The Church should be, above everything else, a 
great power house ; the source of energy, spiritual 
energy. There should be resident in the Church 
of God in these days sufficient to transform all 
life — Power that is at once explosive, continuous, 
inexhaustible." — But no one need be troubled lest 



February, 1931 



13 



the Church fail. She will not. Gloom and pessi- 
mism have no part in a Christian religion. Glad- 
ness comes with unselfish service. No matter what 
discouragement has come, what plans have gone 
awry and budgets not paid, be loyal, pray for the 
Church, find your part in the new plans, put aside 
your anxieties and believe that Christ is at the 
helm guiding us and bringing us through the 
troublous times. So, dear friends, I ask you to- 
day to increase the knowledge of the program of 
the whole church in your parish. Arrange to 
study the situation with your rector and senior 
warden. Lose no opportunity to talk about the 
work enthusiastically and to enlist other peoples 
interest in it. 

To return to the Auxiliary Work, I must call 
your attention to a resolution passed at the Pro- 
vincial meeting of the Auxiliary. "That the wo- 
men of the Church use every opportunity to in- 
fluence public opinion toward enabling the Negro 
to secure for himself justice in the courts, better 
housing conditions, a more normal economic situ- 
ation and his best racial development. This reso- 
lution speaks for itself — I need add nothing to it. 
Study the conditions as you have them in your 
own community and then make plans to follow the 
lines of the resolution. 

Your work of 1930 is reviewed for you in the 
reports of your other officers. I will not repeat 
it. My report of it goes to the Convention and is 
published in the Annual also. Many of you have 
such a great love for the Auxiliary that it is really 
a large factor in your every day lives. I be* you 
not to keep it to yourselves. Let us strengthen 
and renew it by telling other women what it can 
mean to them personally, if they give themselves 
to it. Let us cultivate interest and leadership in 
the young women we come in touch with. Let us 
show them the glowing, vibrant, beautiful force 
that the Auxiliary is in the Church to-day. And 
now, in this meeting, let us, through the guidance 
of the Holy Spirit, endeavor to gain inspiration 
and strength to face all discouragements and trials 
and begin our new year together with a sense of 
thanksgiving. 

JANIE WILLIAMS MacMILLAN 
* 

THE EAST CAROLINA BRANCH OF THE 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

to the 

NATIONAL COUNCIL 



Report of the Nominating Committee 

THE Nominating Committee hereby makes the 
following nominations for delegates and al- 
ternates to the Triennial Meeting of the Woman's 



Auxiliary, meeting at Denver, Colorado, in Sep- 
tember, 1931. 

The Committee further asks the privilege of 
bringing in names of a number of women as visit- 
ors or observers who are requested to attend the 
Triennial and become acquainted with its work- 
ings. 

Delegates 

Mrs. Henry Jay MacMillan, Wilmington; Mrs. 
Charles J. Sawyer, Windsor; Mrs. E. B. Ficklen, 
Greenville; Mrs. J. Walter Williamson, Wilming- 
ton; Mrs. John De Vane, Fayetteville. 

Alternates 

Mrs. J. Lawrence Sprunt, Wilmington; Mrs, 
Fred L. Outland, Washington; Mrs. W. S. Cara- 
wan, Columbia; Mrs. C. C. Branch, Burgaw; Mrs. 
T. C. Darst, Wilmington. 

Visitors and Observers 

Mrs. W. A. Graham, Edenton; Mrs. C. A. Jef- 
fres, Kinston; Mrs. A. H. Worth, Elizabeth City; 
Mrs. Owen Dunn, New Bern ; Mrs. Kenneth RoyalL 
Goldsboro; Mrs. A. B. Houtz, Elizabeth City; Miss 
Anne Milton, Wilmington; Miss Eliza Grimes, 
Washington; Mrs. T. D. Warren, New Bern; Mrs. 
Sidney MacMillan, Wilmington; Mrs. John A. 
Guion, New Bern; Miss Marguerite Walker, Wil- 
mington; Mrs. A. M. Waddell, Wilmington; Mrs. 
Borden Cobb, Goldsboro; Mrs. Jennie Howard, 
Greenville, (whole of East Carolina) ; Miss Cor- 
nelia Harris, Wilmington, (whole of East Caro- 
lina). 

Committee: 

FANNIE CHASE STATON, Chmto. 
ROSABEL R. COWPER, 
MARY NIXON ROBERTS, 
PENELOPE S. McMULLAN, 
IDA WHARTON GRIMES. 

In announcing the ticket Mrs. Staton said she 
had taken the liberty of an old officer who many 
times had had the privilege of representing the 
East Carolina Auxiliary at Triennials, to name the 
four members of the Nominating Committee as 
visitors to Denver. Mrs. Staton refused to allow 
her name to be nominated from the floor. 

* 

PROVINCIAL SYNOD REPORT ON ADVANCE 
WORK 

WE, the Committee on Findings of the Con- 
ference on Advance Work, respectfully 
submit: 

We heard with real thankfulness and encourage- 
ment from all of the fifteen dioceses of this Pro- 



14 



The Mission Herald 



vince of the acceptance of objectives for the ad- 
vance work of the Church. With each diocese 
taking a goal, we can look forward to another step 
forward — that of realizing that a goal must be 
a minimum towards which we can work and that 
the course of Christ must call forth our utmost 
generosity. The advance work is a program which 
requires that every individual share in a great 
sacrificial response to this appeal from the Church. 

In our President's report to the Synod, she of- 
fers the Auxiliary to be used more completely in 
the furtherance of the Program. 

The Committee suggests that each clergyman 
be told of our desire for such service. 

Whether the parish or diocese has been organ- 
ized for putting the program before the people, or 
not, effort should be made by every branch of the 
Auxiliary for constructive education about the 
projects. Make use of all possible meetings, con- 
vocational district meetings, annual meetings and 
parochial meetings; wherever it is possible bring 
to these meetings people who have vital stories to 
tell. 

We call your attention to the fact that we are 
making history. What we do today, determines 
what the Church will be in the future. We move 
forward or we move backward. If we move back- 
ward we move alone, as Christ moves only for- 
ward. 

We need to think of these projects in terms of 
romance, courage, love, faith, and the joy that 
comes from a task well done. 

We need, wherever it is possible, to give more 
heroic witness so that we may help to bring in a 
new day for the Christ. 

We need to emphasize the closing words of our 
Conference, "My command is first advance, second 
advance, third advance, but let us say advance on 
our knees." 

Committee : 

janie w. McMillan, 

FRANCES LOCKHART, 
OLIVIA TALMADGE, 

RENA CLARK. 

* * * 

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CENTER 

THE most important event in the life of the 
Student Work at the East Carolina Teacher's 
College was the Diocesan Convention which met 
at St. Paul's Church, Greenville, January 27-29. 

The coming of the Convention was eagerly look- 
ed forward to by the students who threw them- 
selves joyously into the task of helping make it a 
success. The thing that afforded them the most 
happiness was the fact that at least they were 
given an opportunity to have their families and 



friends as guests and to share with them the 
Friendship of their beautiful Student Center. 

On Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, the stu- 
dents presented to the joint meeting of the Con- 
vention a pageant, "The Joyous Road" by Mrs. 
James R. Cain, Provincial President of the Wo- 
man's Auxiliary. This was given in the Church. 
The costumes were made by the girls themselves. 

The cast included: 

Hannah Sue Bodie Macon 

Jeptha's Daughter Doris Burnette 

Mary (the Mother of Jesus) Marguerite Lane 

Priscilla Edna Ward Taylor 

Bertha Elizabeth Douglass 

Anne „ Katherine Hall 

Pioneer Woman Kathryn McAllister 

Colonial Woman Ruth Picklesimer 

Teacher Mary Frances Whitehurst 

Nurse Edna Peele 

Modern Woman Adah B. Sessoms 

Social Worker Clyde Whitfield 

Student Secretary Catherine Holland 

Alice Carolyn Conner 

Beth _...!._.. Catherine Flaugher 

Sue Virginia Blount Cooper 

Mary . Hazel Windley 

Peg Myra Scull 

Organist , Hennie Long 

Rector Mr. Lillycrop 

Crucifier Louis Ficklen 

The pageant was given under the direction of 
Mrs. Picklesimer. 

Later in the afternoon, from 4:30 to 5:30, the 
girls entertained the Convention with a Tea. The 
room was attractively decorated with cut flowers 
in silver baskets, ferns and pink tapers. Notable 
guests in the receiving line were Bishop and Mrs. 
Darst, Dr. John W. Wood, Mrs. H. J. MacMillan, 
Mrs. S. P. Adams, Mrs. Victor Shelburne, Dr. Lula 
Disosway, Rev. Tom Wright, Rev. J. Kenneth 
Morris, Miss Annie Morton Stout and Miss Cor- 
nelia Harris. 

Two new officers have been elected for the Bible 
Class to take the places of girls who did not re- 
turn this term. They are Kathryn McAllister, 
President, and Marguerite Lane, Treasurer and 
Chairman of the Attendance Committee. 

On January 11, the Bible Class was delighted 
to have with them Miss Cornelia Harris. Miss 
Harris chose as her subject "What Christ Means 
To Me", showing in a very real and beautiful way 
how Christ can come into any girl's life and make 
it fuller and richer. 

At the beginning of the new term the Program 
Committee had another one of their meetings to 



February, 1931 



15 



plan programs for this term. The committee con- 
sists of Carolyn Conner, Marguerite Lane, Cather- 
ine Flaugher, Hazel Windley and Roslyn Satter- 
white. Supper prepared by themselves was serv- 
ed before the big open fire during which plans 
were discussed. 

One of our most delightful Club meetings was 
the one of January 23, at which time Mrs. Charles 
White was our artist guest, bringing to us a group 

of songs. 

* * * 

LAMBETH COMFERENCE 

Continued from last month 

Chapter III. 

The Re-union of Christendom. 

1. The Conference records, with deep thanks to Al- 
mighty God, the signs of a growing movement towards 
Christian unity in all parts of the world since the issue 
of the Appeal to All Christian People by the Lambeth 
Conference in 1920. 

2. The Conference heartily endorses that Appeal and 
re-affirms the principles contained in it and in the Reso- 
lutions dealing with Re-union adopted by that Conference. 

The Malines Conversations. 

3. Believing that Our Lord's purpose for His Church 
will only be fulfilled when all the separated parts of His 
Body are united and that only by full discussion between 
the Churches can error and misunderstanding be removed 
and full spiritual unity attained the Conference expresses 
its appreciation of the courage and Christian charity of 
Cardinal Mercier in arranging the Malines Conversations, 
unofficial and not fully representative of the Churches 
though they were, and its regret that by the Encyclical, 
Mortalium animos, members of the Roman Catholic Church 
are forbidden to take part in the Faith and Order and 
other Conferences. 

The Eastern Orthodox Church 

4. (a) The Conference heartily thanks the Ecumeni- 
cal Patriarch for arranging in cooperation with the other 
Patriarchs and the Autocephalous Churches for the send- 
ing of an important Delegation of the Eastern Orthodox 
Church under the leadership of the Partriarch of Alexan- 
dria, and expresses its grateful appreciation of the help 
given to its Committee by the Delegation, as well as its 
sense of the value of the advance made through the joint 
meetings in the relations of the Orthodox Church with 
the Anglican Communion. 

(b) The Conference requests the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury to invite the Ecumenical Parthiarch, in conjunction 
with himself, to appoint a Doctrinal Commission, repre- 
sentative of the Anglican Communion and of the Patri- 
archates and Autocephalous Churches of the East, which 
may, in correspondence and in consultation, prepare a 
joint statement on the theological points about which there 
is difference and agreement between the Anglican and 
the Eastern Churches. 

(c) The Conference not having been summoned as a 
Synod to issue any statement professing to define doctrine, 
is therefore unable to issue such a formal statement on 
the subjects referred to in the Resume of the Discussions 
between the Patriarch of Alexandria with the other Or- 
thodox Representatives and Bishops of the Anglican Com- 
munion, but records its acceptance of the statements of 



the Anglican Bishops contained therein as a sufficient 
account of the teaching and practice of the Church of 
England and of the Churches in communion with it, in 
relation to those subjects. 

5. We express our sympathy with the Church of Rus- 
sia in its persecution and sufferings, and pray that God, 
in His own good time, may give liberty and prosperity 
once more to that Church, that it may again take its place 
with greater freedom and power of self-expression among 
the other great Churches of Christendom. 

The Old Catholic Church 

6. (a) The Conference heartily thanks the Archbishop 
of Utrecht and the Bishops of the Old Catholic Church 
associated with him for their mission to consult with its 
members on the development of closer relations between 
their Churches and the Anglican Communion, and ex- 
presses its sense of the importance of the step taken. 

(b) The Conference requests the Archbishop of Can ten- 
bury to invite the Archbishop of Utrecht, in conjunction 
with himself, to appoint a Doctrinal Commission repre- 
sentative of the Anglican and Old Catholic Churches to 
discuss points of agreement and difference between them. 

(c) The Conference agrees that there is nothing in the 
Declaration of Utrecht inconsistent with the teaching of 
the Church of England. 

The Separated Eastern Churches 

(a) The Conference thanks Bishop Tourin for taking 
counsel with one of its committees on the relations be- 
tween the Armenian Church and the Anglican Church, 
and assures him of its deep sympathy with the sufferings 
of his nation. 

(b) The Conference expresses its deep sympathy with 
the Armenian, Assyrian and West Syrian (Jacobite) 
Christians in the hardship and suffering which they have 
endured since the war, and earnestly prays that they may 
be given strength and courage in their efforts for self- 
preservation, as well as that their rights may be fully 
secured as religious or racial minorities in the territories 
in which they live. 

(c) The Conference welcomes the development of closer 
relations between the Anglican Church and the Separated 
Churches of the East which are recorded in its Commit- 
tee's Report, and earnestly desires that these relations 
may be steadily strengthened, in consultation with the 
Orthodox Church, in the hope that in due course full in- 
tercommunion may be reached 

The Church of Sweden 

14. The Conference thanks the Church of Sweden for 
the visit of the Bishop of Lund and expresses its hope 
that the present friendly intercourse will be continued 
with that Church and that relations may also be strength- 
ened with the other Scandinavian Churches with a view 
to promoting greater unity in the future. 

The Church of Finland 

15. The Conference requests the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury to appoint, as soon as seems advisable, a committee 
to investigate the position of the Church of Finland and 
its relations to the Church of England. 

The Moravians (Unitas Fratinum) 

16. The Conference is grateful to the Moravian Church 
for sending so important a body of representatives to 
confer with their committee, and respectfully requests 
the Archbishop of Canterbury to appoint a new committee 
of the Moravian Church. 

Continued next month 



16 



The Mission Herald 






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The Mission Herald 



INDEX Page 

The Bishop's Letter ._ ._ 3 

Episcopal Foundation 4 

Diocesan Officers 5 

Work at St. Elizabeth's Hospital 6 

Editorials 8 

Galilee Mission 10 

Miss Angy Manning Taylor 11 

Christ Church, Elizabeth City 11 

Report of Committee on Insurance 12 

Captain Turner, C. A 12 

St. John, Evangelist, Edenton 13 

Woman's Auxiliary 13 to 15 

Lambeth Resolutions 15 



3ln M 



emavtum 



WILLIAM EDGAR MEWBORN 

Mr. William E. Mewborn, whose death occurred 
in Kinston, N. C, on the twenty-eighth of Novem- 
ber last, was for many years a faithful and devot- 
ed member of St. Mary's Church, Kinston, a loyal 
and earnest son of the Diocese of East Carolina, 
and throughout his entire life a most sincere and 
consistent Churchman. In the recent passing in- 
to "Life Eternal" of Mr. Mewborn, St. Mary's 
Parish and the Diocese sustained a great loss; as 
did also the State of North Carolina, and the com- 
munity of which he was an honored citizen. 

Mr. Mewborn was born at Hookerton, Greene 
County, North Carolina, on September first, 1862. 
During the years 1882 to 1885, he was a student 
at the University of North Carolina. After leav- 
ing the University, Mr. Mewborn for several years 
taught school. In 1888, he was married to Miss 
Lula Lang. Three sons and two daughters were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Mewborn. For many years 
Mr. Mewborn and family have made their home 
in Kinston; and have always been very closely 
identified with St. Mary's Church. The passing 
of Mr. W. E. Mewborn has brought real loss to 
both Church and State; and removes from the 
Diocese of East Carolina one of our most devout 
and faithful laymen. Mr. Mewborn is survived 
by his bereaved widow and children, and also by 
one brother, Mr. T. W. Mewborn. Always an up- 
right citizen of the highest type, and a loyal and 
devout communicant of the Church, Mr. Mewborn 
will long be remembered by all who knew him, on 
account of his splendid Christian life, his unswerv- 
ing fortitude and cheerfulness, and his kindly, 
gentle spirit of good will for all. 

"He being dead yet speaketh." 

Resolutions of Respect to the Memory of 
L. F. ZIEGLER 

Another one of the valued members of St. Paul's 
Church has passed away, early Thursday morning 
January 15th, 1931. 



Mr. L. F. Ziegler, a member of the Church for 
many years, and was elected to the Vestry in 
1897, was made a Lay Reader in 1910 and Junior 
Warden in 1920. In all these positions he was 
conscientious in doing his full duty, and by his 
consideration for others, in his contact with them, 
endeared himself to all those around him, fulfill- 
ing the Saviour's command, to love his neighbor 
as himself. 

His life was an open book for all to read, the 
ones who came in closest contact with him, valued 
him the highest. 

To his family, we extend our sincere sympathy 
in this, the greatest loss they have sustained. 
Let us keep his memory green in our hearts by 
remembering his helpful Kindness to all of those 
he has worked with in the years that are past. 
E. R. CONGER, 
W. S. SUMMERELL, 
E. I. WARREN, Comjmittee. 
Copy from the minutes from the St. Paul's 
Vestry, Edenton, N. C. 

MISS RACHEL RUMLEY 

"Blessed are the Merciful, for they shall 

obtain Mercy: 
Blessed are the Pure In Heart, for they 
shall see God!" 

Since, God, in His infinite wisdom, has seen fit 
to take unto Himself the soul of our much loved 
member and friend, Miss Rachel Rumley; what 
more fitting words can we find to express our ap- 
preciation of her and her noble character, than 
are found in the Beatitudes ! Her life was one of 
love and service for others. Pure in heart, thought 
and word ; an angel of mercy to all who called on 
her; a faithful worker and wise counsellor in her 
Church School and St. Peter's Auxiliary in all its 
branches. 

We. therefore, Resolve that we, the members 
of St. Peter's Auxiliary, feel that our loss is irre- 
parable; that. Miss Rachel's place can never be 
filled ; that her cheerful face and ever-ready help 
must be with us always. 

We further Resolve, that our deepest sympathy 
goes out to her bereaved brother and family. 

And we further direct that a copy of these 
Resolutions be sent to the family, to the Mission 
Herald, the city papers, and a copy entered in the 
minutes of the Auxiliary. 

As a mark of respect and esteem, we make no 

greater eulogy than this: "Well done, Good and 

Faithful Sei-vant: Enter thou into the joy of 

thy Lord!" MRS. HANNAH BONNER, Chmn. 

MRS. W. B. MORTON, 

MRS. JARL BOWERS. 



The Mission Herald 



VOL. XLV. 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, MARCH, 1931 



No. 3 



The Bishop's Letter 

THIS letter to our diocesan family must, neces- 
sarily, be brief as my schedule is a very 
crowded one and my time at home decidedly 
limited. 

Following our splendid Convention in Green- 
ville, I spent a few days with my good friend, the 
Rev. Charles A. Ashby, in Jacksonville, and then 
started out on an itenary that has kept me reas- 
onably busy. 

On Sunday, February the fifteenth, I preached 
in the Chapel of the Cross, Chapel Hill, at the 
morning service, and had the pleasure of meeting 
a number of the students from East Carolina at 
an informal gathering in the Parish House that 
afternoon. 

On Monday, the sixteenth, I had the privilege 
of being with the men of St. John's Church, Wil- 
mington, at a supper given by the Brotherhood 
of St. Andrew, of that Parish. 

On Sunday, the twenty-second, I preached in 
the Church of the Redeemer, Baltimore, at 11:00 
A. M., and was the special Lenten preacher in 
Christ Church, Baltimore, that night. 

On Friday, the twenty-seventh, I had a confer- 
ence with the Vestry of Christ Church, New 
Bern. 

On Saturday, the twenty-eighth, I confirmed 
two persons in St. James' Church, Wilmington, 
at 4:00 P. M. 

On Sunday, March first, at the eleven o'clock 
service I preached, confirmed three persons pre- 
sented by the Rev. Thomas H. Wright, and cele- 
brated Holy Communion in Holy Trinity Church, 
Lumberton. 

On the afternoon of March first, I preached and 
confirmed two persons, presented by Mr. Wright, 
in St. Stephen's Church, Red Springs. 

On the evening of the same day, I preached to 
a large congregation at a Community service in 
the Presbyterian Church, in Maxton. 

On Wednesday evening, March fourth, I preach- 
ed at the Lenten Community Service in Grace 
Church, Charleston, S. C. 

On Friday, the sixth, I presided at an Interacial 
Conference and attended a meeting of the Finance 
Department in Wilmington. 



On Saturday, the seventh, I presided at a meet- 
ing of the Executive Committee of Camp Leach 
in Washington, N. C. 

On the afternoon of the seventh, assisted by the 
Rev. Arthur H. Marshall and the Rev. Theodore 
Partrick, I conducted the funeral of my dear 
friend, Mrs. Louis P. Hornthal, in Grace Church. 
Plymouth. 

On Sunday, the eighth, I preached, confirmed 
five persons presented by the Rev. Leon Malone, 
and celebrated Holy Communion in St. Mary's 
Church, Gatesville. 

In the afternoon I preached and confirmed two 
persons, presented by Mr. Malone. in St. Peter's 
Church, Sunbury. I also confirmed a sick man 
in private at his home near Sunbury. 

In the evening I preached in St. John's Church, 
Winton. 

On the evening of the ninth, I preached in St. 
Barnabas' Church, Murfreesboro. 

This letter is being written on Saturday, the 
fourteenth, and I am leaving in a few minutes 
for Beaufort, where I will preach and confirm to- 
morrow morning, going on to Morehead for a ser- 
vice tomorrow night. 

With an earnest prayer that this Lenten season 
may be a time of spiritual enrichment to all of us. 
I am faithfully and affectionately, 

Your friend and Bishop, 

THOMAS C. DARST. 
* * * 

THE BISHOP'S APPOINTMENTS 

March — 

29. St. James', Wilmington, 11:00 A. M. 
30-April 3. Midday Lenten Service, Garrick 
Theatre, Philadelphia. 
April — 

5. Church of the Good Shepherd, Wilming- 
ton, 11:00 A. M. 
9. Christ Church, New Bern, 8:00 P. M. 
12. St. John's Church, Fayetteville, 11 :00 A.M. 
St. Joseph's Church, Fayetteville, 8 P. M. 
14. Woman's Auxiliary Convention, Wilson, 
N. C, 8:00 P. M. 

19. St. Peter's Church, Washington, A. M. and 
P. M. 

20. St. Thomas' Church, Ba^ h, 8 :00 P. M. 
23-26. Week-end Mission, Christ Church, 

Elizabeth City. 



The Mission Herald 



Tlie Episcopal Foundation of {he 
Diocese of EasT: Carolina 

W. G. Gaither 

IT is little comfort to be charged with the re- 
sponsibility of the affairs of the Diocese of 
East Carolina, to know that financial conditions 
in all sections of the country are much the same 
as we find them here. The obligations of our 
Diocese are more or less fixed: - but that, un- 
fortunately, isn't true of our income. This fact 
is impressed more forcibly upon us with each 
recurring depression in business and agriculture. 
Since it is apparently impossible to put an end 
to these periods of depression isn't it the part 
of wisdom to meet the situation by establishing 
our income on such a basis that our obligations 
can be met and our work carried on ? 

What I have to say to you today, will in no way 
relieve the immediate situation. However, it is 
brought to your attention at this time with the 
approval and at the request of the Bishop and 
Executive Council in the hope that, as time goes 
on and conditions once more become normal, the 
proposed plan may develop in such a way as to 
enable our Diocese to maintain its splendid stand- 
ing among the dioceses of the National Church; 
and to relieve our Bishop of the worry and strain 
of diocesan finances, that he may be free to devote 
his great mind and energies, in larger measure, 
to the spiritual development of the diocese, with 
sufficient financial support to carry out those 
practical plans which his long experience causes 
him to feel are necessary. To accomplish this it 
is suggested that we here and now take steps 
looking to an endowment for our Diocese. You 
doubtless know that the National Church is work- 
ing on a plan of this kind at the present time and 
you are of course, familiar with the great bene- 
fits to mankind accomplished through the endow- 
ment funds of some of our country's outstanding 
Universities and Hospitals. 

The plan is that we authorize the organization 
of "The Episcopal Foundation of the Diocese of 
East Carolina" (or let it be called by such other 
more appropriate name that may be decided upon) 
tc ue administered by a Boa.'d of Trustees of five 
members including the Bishop; the charter to 
clothe the Trustees with broad powers and to 
provide for an organization as hereinafter set out. 

The purpose of the Foundation is "to provide 
a Fund the income from which would be used 
for the development of the religious, educational 
and charitable work of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the Diocese of East Carolina". And, 
among other things, it would be empowered to 



1. To render financial assistance to worthy 
young men desirous of entering the ministry ; 

2. To render financial assistance to capable 
young women desiring to prepare for religious 
work, either at home or abroad; 

3. To supplement the salary of the clergy in 
certain cases, until the local church or mission is 
self-supporting ; 

4. To take care of such cases of charity 
throughout the Diocese which cannot be provided 
for locally; 

5. And for such other religious, educational or 
charitable purposes as the Trustees may deem 
proper. 

Possibly at this time I should tell you that this 
is not an appeal to you for funds, but rather it 
provides a means whereby anyone so inclined may 
either now or at some future time contribute 
money or securities for the permanent use and 
benefits of the Church with the assurance that any 
such contribution will be wisely and economically 
administered. 

The Foundation would, of course, start with no 
funds ; but power of suggestion is remarkable and 
if given a reasonable amount of publicity through 
the Mission Herald and possibly from the pulpit 
from time to time, it is felt that a good start could 
be made by the time this body convenes next 
year ; and it would seem altogether possible to look 
forward to having a fund of such proportions in 
five years as to yield a substantial income, which 
income should then be a vital force in accomplish- 
ing those things for which the endowment was 
created. 

It is believed that as the plan is developed we 
would find that a great many of our members, 
both men and women, would provide substantially 
for the Foundation in their wills, where they had 
not felt inclined to do during their life time ; also 
that a large number of interested churchmen, 
feeling unable to make a cash contribution, would 
purchase an additional insurance policy for $1,000, 
(or possibly in some cases for as much as $10,000), 
keeping up the premiums during life and deposit- 
ing the policy with the Foundation, the funds to 
become available upon the death of the donor. 

No doubt many other plans for building up the 
funds of the Foundation would occur to the Board 
of Trustees, who would always be glad to have 
suggestions looking to this end from interested 
churchmen. 

The organization of the Foundation is a rela- 
tively simple matter. A charter would, of course, 
have to be obtained but this could be done either 
by -the Executive Council or by a special organiza- 
tion committee to be appointed. It is suggested 



March, 1931 






that the charter provide that the Bishop of the 
Diocese should always be one of the Trustees and 
that the other four members of the Board of Trus- 
tees be appointed from among the layman of the 
Diocese by the Executive Council, which body 
would fix the term of office of such Trustees, 
providing that one member serve for three years, 
one for four years, and the other two for a period 
of five years. The charter should doubtless also 
provide that any Trustee could be reappointed to 
succeed himself upon the expiration of his term of 
office, and that any vacancy in the Board of Trus- 
tees be filled by the Executive Council. 

The Board of Trustees should be given power to 
invest and reinvest the funds of the Foundation, 
within certain restrictions, and should be required 
to make a full and complete report of its opera- 
tions at each Annual Convention. It is suggested 
that the Executive Secretary of the Diocese serve 
as Secretary to the Board of Trustees. 

I have stated to you briefly — and I hope clearly 
— what has been in the minds and hearts of some 
of us for several years and I trust it will receive 
favorable consideration at your hands. If some 
such plan as this could have been put into effect in 
years gone by, possibly our troubles of today 
would be of smaller proportions. 

Personally, I am very much in earnest about 
this endowment and have great confidence that it 
will operate successfully. While I should like to 
see it given a trial, I trust none of you will vote 
for the proposal unless you are willing to get be- 
hind it and help make it a success. To cooperate 
it is not necessary to burden yourself in order to 
make a large contribution at this time; but to be 
successful the plan must have publicity and you 
can certainly see that your friends and neighbors 
are fully informed regarding it, arranging your 
own contribution at such time as you find it most 
convenient. 

Some among you might feel that it is no time to 
start something new when our individual burdens 
are so great, but I would say in that connection 
that it costs nothing to make the start and the 
adoption of this plan cannot possibly increase the 
financial burden of any of us unless voluntarily 
done. On the other hand, I am convinced that 
every churchman at some time or other during the 
course of his lifetime experiences a sincere desire 
to do something real and definite for regligious 
advancement. It occurs to me that this plan offers 
at least one splendid opportunity to those who 
might have such a desire. I believe if the Foun- 
dation is organized and vigorously followed up, 
that its development and accomplishments will be 



gratifying to all of us. Are you willing to give 

it a trial? 

* 

Resolution referring to above Report- 
Resolved, That the Report of Mr. Gaither be ac- 
cepted with thanks of this Convention. 

Resolved further, That said Report be, and it 
is hereby approved by this Convention and the 
formation of such a Foundation be, and it is here- 
by authorized. 

Resolved further, That said Report be referred 
to the Executive Council with instructions to take 
action, in the name of this Convention, necces- 
sary to secure the incorporation of said Founda- 
tion, substantially in accord with said Report. 
* * * 

Diocesan Officers 

Executive Council 

Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Bishop, Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

Rev. Wm. H. Milton, D. D., Vice-Chairman, 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Rev. Walter R. Noe, Member Ex-officio, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, Wilmington, N. C. 

For One Year: 

Rev. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Kev. Alexander Miller, Wilmington, N. C. 
Major B. R. Huske, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Dr. Robert L. Carr, Greenville, N. C. 
Mrs. S. P. Adams, Wilmington, N. C. 

For Two Years: 

Rev. Wm. H. Milton, D. D., Wilmington, N. C. 
Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, Greenville, N. C. 
Mr. George C. Royall, Goldsboro, N. C. 
Mr. George B. Elliott, Wilmington, N. C. 
Mrs. H. J. MacMillan, Wilmington, N. C. 

For Three Years: 

Rev. C. E. Williams, Creswell, N. C. 
Rev. Archer Boogher, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Mr. John R. Tolar, Fayetteville, N. C. 
Mr. W. G. Gaither, Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Mrs. Victor Shelburne, Washington, N. C. 

Standing Comimittee: 

Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D., Pres., Edenton, N. C. 
Rev. Stephen Gardner, Rev. B. F. Huske, D. D., 
Mr. E. R. Conger, Mr. J. C. B. Ehringhaus. 
Board of Examining Chaplains to 1932 

Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D., Pres., Edenton, N. C. 
Rev. Wm. PI. Milton, D. D., Rev. E. T. Jillson, 
Rev. W. O. Cone, Rev. Alexander Miller. 

Trustees of Dio ese 
Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Chairman Ex- 
officio, Mr. J. V. Grainger, Mr. Robert Strange. 



The Mission Herald 



Trustees of the University of the South: 

Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Rev. A. C. 
D. Noe, to 1934; Mr. W. D. MacMillan, Jr., to 
1934; Mr. J. Q. Beckwith, to 1934. 

Trustees of St. Mary's School: 

Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D„ Rev. R. B. 
Drane, D. D., to 1932 ; Rev. J. B. Gibble, to 1934 ; 
Mr. W. D. MacMillan, Jr., to 1932 ; Mr. George C. 
Royall, to 1934. 

Board of Managers of Thompson Orphanage: 

Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D. D., Ex-officio; 
Dr. Ira M. Hardy, to 1932 ; Rev. E. W. Halleck, to 
1934; Mrs. S. W. Tillinghast, to 1932; Dr. Wm. 
Cobb Whitfield, to 1934. 

Deputies to General Convention: 

Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., Wilmington; Rev. W. 
R. Noe, Wilmington; Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D., 
Edenton; Rev. Stephen Gardner, Washington; Mr. 
George B. Elliott, Wilmington; Mr. George C. 
Royall, Goldsboro; Judge George Rountree, Wil- 
mington ; Mr. Champion McD. Davis, Wilmington. 
Alternate Deputies: 

Rev. Alexander Miller, Wilmington ; Rev. W. A. 
Lillycrop, Greenville; Rev. Archer Boogher, Fay- 
etteville ; Rev. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City ; Mr. 
John G. Bragaw, Washington; Mr. E. R. Conger, 
Edenton; Mr. J. Q. Beckwith, Lumberton; Mr. 
John R. Tolar, Fayetteville. 

H< # # 

DEPARTMENTS OF EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Department of Missions and Church 
Extension : 

Mr. George B. Elliott, Vice-Chairman, Wilming- 
ton, N. C. ; Rev. George F. Hill, Secretary, Eliza- 
beth City, N. C; Rev. Wm. H. Milton, D. D., Rev. 
Walter R. Noe, Rev. Alexander Miller, Rev. Archer 
Boogher, Mr. George C. Royall, Mrs. S. P. Adams, 
Mrs. H. J. MacMillan, Mrs. Victor Shelburne. 

Associate Member, Rev. W. 0. Cone. 

Department of Religious Education: 

Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, Vice-Chairman, Green- 
ville, N. C. ; Rev. I. deL. Brayshaw, Director, Wil- 
mington, N. C. ; Mrs. J. B. Cranmer, Secretary, 
Wilmington, N. C. ; Rev. Archer Boogher. 

Associate Members: Rev. I.deL. Brayshaw, Mrs. 
Jennie M. Howard, Mrs. J. B. Cranmer, Mrs. James 
G. Staton, Rev. J. W. Herritage, D. D., Miss Cor- 
nelia Van B. Harris, Mrs. H. M. Bonner. 

Department of Christian Social Service: 

Rev. Charles E. Williams, Vice-Chairman, Cres- 
well, N. C. ; Rev. Walter R. Noe, Mr. John R. Tolar, 
Mr. George C. Royall. 

Associate Members: Rev. F. D. Dean, M. D., 
Rev. S. N. Griffith, Mrs. W. S. Carrowan. 



Department of Finance: 

Mr. John R. Tolar, Vice-Chairman, Fayetteville, 
N. C. ; Mr. T. F. Darden, Secretary, Wilmington; 
Mr. George C. Royall, Dr. R. L. Carr, Mr. W. G. 
Gaither, Major B. R. Huske. 

Associate Members : Mr. C. VanLeuven, Mr. D. 
F. Wooten, Mr. D. M. Warren, Mr. E. K. Bishop, 
Mr. J. D. Grimes, Mr. J. V. Grainger, Mr. T. 
F. Darden, Mr. Robert Strange. 

Department of Publicity : 

Rev. George F. Hill, Vice-Chairman, Elizabeth 
City, N. C. ; Rev. W. R. Noe, Rev. W. A. Lillycrop. 

Associate Members : Rev. Stephen Gardner, 
Rev. I. deL. Brayshaw, Mrs. George F. Hill, Mrs. 
Harry G. Walker. 

Field Department: 

Rev. Alexander Miller, Vice-Chairman, Wil- 
mington, N. C. ; Mrs. S. P. Adams, Secretary, Wil- 
mington, N. C. ; Rev. W. H. Milton, D. D., Rev. 
W. R. Noe, Mr. George B. Elliott, Mr. George C. 
Royall. 

Associate Members: Mrs. J. B. Cranmer, Rev. 
R. I. Johnson. 

Glimpses of the Work at Saint 
Elizabeth's Hospital 

Lula M. Disoswwy, M. D. 

ST. Elizabeth's Hospital, as we know, is our 
Church hospital for women and children in 
Shanghai. To tell about the life there is a big 
subject and we must be contented with a few 
glimpses. In order to understand the hospital 
work more fully, it will be interesting to get a 
background. When you land in Shanghai you 
find you are a foreigner in a strange land. Going 
through the streets of the international settle- 
ment you are probably surprised at foreign ways 
of travel, automobiles, trollies, trackless trams, 
etc., with the rickshas, wheelbarrows and other 
Chinese ways of travel. On all sides you see 
foreign buildings and meet foreigners, Americans, 
British, and other nationalities and with them the 
Chinese. Many of the Chinese are dressed in 
native clothes but quite a few men are in Ameri- 
can clothes. Let us not forget we are in the for- 
eign concession of that cosmopolitan city of Shang- 
hai. Should we have time to go into the native 
city of Shanghai we would find true Chinese life. 
The narrow streets, the absence of foreign in- 
fluence, the most interesting small shops and 
Tea Houses. The native city is far more facinat- 
ing than the International Settlement. 

St. Elizabeth's is located in the Settlement but 
in a section that is very Chinese. Just in front 
of the Hospital Compound is a typical Chinese 



March, 1931 



market. Here in this big open air market the 
Chinese are busy selling their wares such as 
native vegetables, fish alive and dead; birds of 
all kinds and many other interesting things. Oc- 
casionally we'll see a stand with foreign tooth 
brushes or other articles. Here and there we 
see men and women bargaining and discussing 
the price of a comimodity. This bargaining is a 
favorite custom of the Chinese. They will bar- 
gain for half an hour in order to get the purchase 
a few coppers cheaper. But those few coppers 
mean much when a months pay may only be five 
or six dollars. Near by are the money changers 
and we hear the ringing of dollars as the changers 
test their trueness. So life around the Hospital 
goes on in a certain slow way so characteristic 
of the Orient. 

Across from this busy market, we pass along a 
driveway and find ourselves 
in the Hospital compound. 
As we enter the Cross, on 
the Hospital building, 
catches our attention. The 
compound is rather attrac- 
tive, especially when the 
flowers and trees are in 
bloom. The first building on 
the right, as we enter, is 
our clinic building. Here 
daily the Chinese crowd in 
to get relief from their ail- 
ments. Long before the 
Clinic hours of 10-12 and 
2-4 P. M., they come for 
help. It is a common sight 
to see the Clinic doctors at 
work on an opium suicide 
patient. Tired of home, or a love affair or the 
bringing home of another wife has probably been 
the cause of the suicide and when the patient is 
almost dead the family brings her to the clinic. 

Going from the Clinic we reach the Hospital 
building, an old brick building w r hich has been 
built onto or added to in order to accomodate 
the number of patients we now have. Yearly 
three thousand or more are treated. Leaving the 
Hospital by the side door, we come to a more 
modern building — our Chinese nurses home. But 
we have outgrown that and now have built near 
to it a home for our night nurses and two Chinese 
doctors. Almost in front of the Hospital is the 
home of the foreign staff. Thus we have a rough 
picture of the compound. Just next to us and 
only separated by a wall is the Church Compound 
of St. Peter's, our Chinese Church. 

Probably the best way to get an insight into 



the life of the Hospital is to make rounds and 
follow the nurses and doctors as they go from 
ward to ward. It is impossible to have uninter- 
rupted rounds at the Hospital but in this imagin- 
ary case we'll go from place to place quickly. To 
go through the Hospital in Winter, we must dress 
appropriately because our wards are not heated 
and the cold of Shanghai is such that it seems to 
penetrate to the very bone marrow. We, there- 
fore, dress in our heavy winter underwear, two 
or three soft, woolen sweaters and then a Chinese 
padded gown and over this a white gown. Our 
feet are protected by woolen hose. Dressed in 
this manner we are ready to see the Hospital 
fairly comfortably. 

At 7:00 A. M., we assemble for Chapel. Here 
we meet sixty student nurses, bright, intelligent 
girls from all parts of China, who are studying 




modern nursing and then using it among their 
people. We see ten or fifteen Chinese graduate 
nurses, capable women who are in charge of our 
wards and other important posts. With them are 
our two American nurses who supervise the train- 
ing school, the Hospital and instruct the nurses. 
Practically all the teaching is done in Chinese. At 
Chapel we also meet our Deaconess, who is un- 
tiring in her work at the Hospital. Here also are 
our two Chinese doctors and three American 
doctors. The Chapel service begins and we hear 
a very beautiful morning prayer service all in 
Chinese. 

At 8:30 A. M., after we have had a good break- 
fast of foreign food, not Chinese, we meet for 
rounds. In making rounds we'll probably see 
many things that at first glance do not seem to 
be the best way of doing things. You'll see beds 

Continued on page nine 



The Mission Herald 



ORGAN OF THE DIOCESE OF EAST CAROLINA 

Published Monthly, except August, at 

ELIZABETH CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 

Subscription $1.00 a Year, Payable in Advance 
Single Copies 10 Cents 
EDITORIAL STAFF 
Editor 
REV. GEORGE F. HILL 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Contributing Editors 
RT. REV. THOMAS C. DARST, D. D. 
MRS. HENRY J. MacMILLAN 
Advertising rates furnished on application. 
Obituaries and formal resolutions, one cent pei word. 
Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Subscribers changing their address, or failing to re- 
ceive their papers, should promptly notify the Business 
Manager, giving when necessary, both the old and new 
addresses. 

* * * 

STUDYING THE BIBLE 

MISS Angy Manning Taylor, "may her tribe 
increase", has been a real blessing to all who 
have heard her. Those who have failed to take 
advantage of her teaching have missed a spiritual 
blessing indeed. Her plan of Bible Study and 
prayer is found is this issue of the Mission Herald. 
She not only uses this plan herself but thinks it 
the best she has seen. Any one using this plan 
will find that Bible reading will no longer be a 
duty to be performed but a genuine pleasure. 
This plan carried out will make the Bible live and 
have a real meaning to the reader as never before. 
It brings to life the dormant soul and floods life 
with the peace of Christ. 

In the King James version of the Bible in the 
39th psalm we find "While I was musing the fire 
burned." It is only by musing, study, meditation 
and prayer, such as outlined in this plan, that the 
heart may catch fire. Any reading of the Bible 
by hit and miss plan most always leaves the heart 
cold. To make Bible reading, prayer and study 
an important item of each day's business brings 
warmth to the heart and when it is no longer 
a duty forced upon one by the conscience, but 
done through the love of doing it, then "While 
I was musing the fire burned." 

* 

DIOCESAN MACHINERY 

THE names of the appointed and elected offi- 
cers of the diocease are found in this issue. 
It is often surprising to see how many supposedly 
well informed members of the Church know noth 
ing about the diocesan machinery. The infor- 
mation given in this article should be of help 
throughout the year. 



DR. DISOSWAY 

DR. Disosway writes, in this issue, about her 
work in St. Elizabeth's Hospital. Those who 
have not heard Dr. Disosway tell about her work 
have missed a real treat. Her talks are convincing, 
and converting and leaves one not merely inter- 
ested but boosting. Read her article. 

"CASE FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS" 

IN the February 1931 copy of The American 
Mercury you will find a splendid article en- 
titled "Case for Foreign Missions" by Henry A. 
Perkins. Every one should read this article for 
it is "different" from the usual "groove thinking" 
about foreign missions. Dr. Perkins is not a 
missionary but a professor of physics, who travel- 
ed around the world and saw foreign missions at 
work. He writes from personal observation. It 
is easy to read and most interesting and instruc- 
tive. It gives many concrete facts about foreign 
missions as to their value. You should read this 
article. 

* 
THE EPISCOPAL FOUNDATON 

AT the last diocesan convention Mr. W. G. Gai- 
ther of Elizabeth City, read the article in 
this issue, "The Episcopal Foundation." The 
ideas found here if earned out would be of tre- 
mendous help to the Bishop in earring out the 
work of the Church. We sincerely hope that 
Mr. Gaither's suggestion will not be allowed to 
die on some one's desk. The Cause of Christ can 
be greatly helped by this plan. 

* 
IS THE MISSIN HERALD NEEDED 

AT a meeting of a committee appointed by the 
last diocesan convention it was discussed as to 
whether the Mission Herald should continue as it 
is now being issued or to do without it altogether, 
or issue same only about four times per year. 
The discussion was forced on account of the pre- 
sent limited number of subscribers in the diocese 
making it financially impossible to issue the paper 
as heretofore. On February 2, 1931, there were 
only 364 subscribers in the diocese who were paid 
up. There were 475 who were in arrears, making 
a total of 839 subscribers in the diocese including 
both those paid up and those in arrears. There 
are about 7200 confirmed members of the Church 
in the diocese. 

The Woman's Auxilary has undertaken the job 
of securing subscriptions for the Mission Herald. 
If they do not meet with real interest and cooper- 
ation on the part of the people it will be necessary 
either to do away with the Mission Herald al- 
together, reduce it materially in size, or to publish 
same only about four times during the year in- 
stead of monthly as now published. 



March, 1931 



GLIMPSES OF THE WORK AT SAINT 
ELIZABETH'S HOSPITAL 

Continued from page seven 

quite crowded together. But don't forget we are 
in a mission hospital in a foreign country and 
those who have been there for years have worked 
out methods adaptable to the people. Again re- 
member our equipment is limited and things are 
not always as we want them but as we get them. 
The patients we'll see are mostly Chinese, many 
of the Coolie class, many of the better classes. 
Now and then we'll find the Sikh women from 
India. It is rather interesting to see the big, 
stalwart Sikh policemen come to the Hospital and 
prepare food for their wives, who do not eat Chi- 
nese food. Occasionally we will see a few Fili- 
pinos or Japanese. 

In the medical ward, we find types of all dis- 
eases ; ignorant of disease they wait until it has ad- 
vanced and then come to us. The pneumonia cases 
are pathetic. In the summer Typhoid and Dysen- 
tery patients come in so fast we can hardly keep 
beds for them. With them comes the problem of 
ever watching the family to prevent the bringing 
in of food and bad fruit. I remember one patient 
with Disentery. She was convalescing when a 
friend came to visit her. Somehow the friend slip- 
ped by the door keeper and brought in with her a 
bag of hard pears, dirty and not fit to eat. The 
head nurse saw her, had been suspicious and stop- 
ped her on the way to the bed. She denied having 
the fruit for her, wandered around through two 
wards, dodged the nurse and gave the fruit to the 
sick woman. Of course, the patient remained with 
us for another treatment. We'll see many interest- 
ing things in the medical ward but cannot tell 
all of them. 

When we reach the Obstetrical Ward, we have 
come to one of the most interesting and busy 
spots in the Hospital. In the Ward we'll find, 
as a rule, all the beds filled and the patients happy. 
It is rather fascinating to see their interest in 
each new baby. Last year we had one thousand 
and three (1003) babies. Most of these were 
normal deliveries but quite a few were cases who 
had been treated at home by ignorant mid-wives 
or doctors. These are the cases that touch the 
soft spots in a doctor's heart and the gratitude 
of these patients make up for all the hours of 
lost sleep and fatigue on the part of doctors and 
nurses. Connected with the department we have 
a m'ost interesting prenatal clinic which is grow- 
ing rapidly in numbers. 

In the Surgical Ward, we find many interesting 



cases. Little old ladies with tiny bound feet are 
brought in with broken legs. Women, who have 
fallen down narrow, crooked Chinese stairs come 
to us with fractured arms, skulls, etc. ; occasionally 
a prisoner decides to break jail and jumps out of 
a window and is brought to us with a broken back. 
Here and there as we pass along in the Ward we 
may see a cut throat. In talking to her we find 
it was done during a family fuss. One surgical 
case comes to my mind — she had a fuss with her 
husband and then stuck seven needles into her 
abdominal wall. She did it to "gain face". When 
she did not die at once, they rushed her to the 
Hospital. The needles were removed and after 
a stormy convalescence she went home. The pa- 
tients with large tumors are interesting. Could 
we follow them into the operating room we would 
get a real thrill watching Dr. Fullerton as she re- 
moves these tumors. 

The children's Ward, with Dr. Richey ever 
ready to administer to their needs, is a pleasant 
place for us to visit. The diseases, the condition 
of the children, fill us with love for these brown 
eyed, black haired youngsters. Often on admis- 
sion they are afraid of the strangeness, but they 
soon learn to know us. It is a joy to watch the 
ambulatory ones especially when Deaconess Put- 
nam is holding services. These little tots hurry 
around to help by distributing hymn books, cards 
etc. It is beautiful to hear their little voices 
singing our own hymns. Occasionally we see one 
child teaching another or even daring to teach 
an adult. 

The glimpses we have received of the Hospital 
work are only superficial. A tremendous work 
is going on at St. Elizabeth's under Dr. Fuller- 
ton's leadership. The work is hard and at times 
we grow weary but the joy of the work far ex- 
ceeds any efforts of ours. The love and co-oper- 
ation of the Chinese doctors and nurses have 
made possible this work. The privilege of work- 
ing with them is a wonderful opportunity for us. 
The appreciation and the gratitude of the patients 
are a recompense for the small part we have in 
the advancement of modern medicine in China. 
* * * 

REPORT OF COMMISSION ON EVANGELISM 

RESOLVED, That the Convention approves the 
plans for a Diocesan-Wide Mission outlined 
by the Chairman of the Commission on Evange- 
lism, and that the members of the Convention, 
both clerical and lay, pledge themselves, both 
officially and personally, to full support of the 
Mission and to sacrificial endeavor in every way 
to insure the success of the Mission. 



10 



The Mission Herald 



Galilee Mission 

Miss Lona Weatherly 

OUR Southland has many "show places" within 
its borders that stir our imagination and 
recall a period of our history of which we are 
justly proud — but I do not believe that there is 
another more impressive in its beauty or that 
lends more dignity to our past than the "Big 
House" on the shores of Lake Phelps, seven miles 
from Creswell, N. C. 

On this estate of several thousand acres lived 
Mr. Josiah Collins, who was indeed one of the 
foremost of his time, surrounded by his family 




and many friends. The household was waited 
upon by a number of slaves who also furnished 
the amusements for the plantation guests. In the 
afternoons there were boat and horse races for 
the amusements of those present, and as the day 
drew to a close and all the work on the farm was 
done there was dancing at the "Mansion" and the 
sound of the music could be heard rising from the 
cabin quarters. In front of the cabins you could 
find the negro with his bango or violin playing 
and singing the old songs that were so dear to his 
heart. Happiness seemed to reign supreme. 

Then came the terrors of the Civil War. Troops 
entered this section. The "Big House" was used 
as officers quarters, one of the other buildings be- 
came a hospital, the whole estate became a supply 
base for the Northern troops. Disaster was on 
every side. The era of peace and quiet seemed 
ended forever. 



Since the war the estate has changed owners 
often; today it is owned by a company, and is 
farmed by white tenants on shares. These ten- 
ants are the people who make up our mission con- 
gregation and whose children share in our week 
day school. 

When we turn our minds back to the beginning 
of Galilee Mission it seems but a short time since 
that Sunday afternoon we met out under the 
trees with eight people present for our first ser- 
vice, and then as the crowd increased and the 
weather grew colder we moved into the old hos- 
pital building, and then into the "Old Home" 
where our first Confirmation Class was presented. 
One can scarcely believe that it has been eight 
years since that time unless we look into the 
changes that have taken place. We have a splen- 
did Chapel now where our services and the school 
are held~we have about one hundred and fifty on 
our Church School roll book with an average at- 
tendance of much over a hundred. Four years ago 
we opened the day school with fifteen pupils pres- 
ent, teaching the first three grades only. Last year 
we had thirty pupils and taught the first six 
grades with two divisions in the first grade. We 
are teaching the same courses that are taught in 
tjhe public schools of the State in the hope that 
our pupils will continue their studies when we 
turn them out. The greatest change of all has 
taken place in the people themselves, we have 
seen them grow into groups of happy and faithful 
people who are willing to make any sacarifice to 
help carry on the work which we have under- 
taken. It is a touching scene to watch them 
down on their knees scrubbing the floor of the 
mission getting things clean for the Sunday Ser- 
vices, to watch them walking five or six miles 
through the hot sun to the services many of them 
carrying children in their arms. We now have 
about forty-five Communicants there and there 
seems to be an increasing interest in the work 
each year. 

This year I hope to start definite organizations 
for the women and girls of the church and through 
them to accomplish a great deal more than we 
have ever done before. The need is great and the 
people are willing to help in every possible way, 
but we need your interest and your prayers if we 
are to do the work in the best way. The task is 
great but working together we can accomplish all 
things for the Master. 

Thanking you for your interest in the past and 
praying God's richest blessings upon our labors 
in the future. 



March, 1931 



11 



MISS ANGY MANNING TAYLOR 

MISS ANGY MANNING TAYLOR, who is 
known as "One of America's greatest Bible 
Teachers", has just concluded a stay of six weeks 
in the Diocese. She has held classes on the Epistle 
to the Philippians and the Gospel according to 
St. John, alternately. Beginning in Wilmington, 
she spent a week each, in Beaufort, New Bern, 
Greenville, Washington and Elizabeth City. Every- 
where the attendance was splendid and the inter- 
est unusual. 

Reports have come in showing already some of 
the results of Miss Taylor's classes. Bible study 
has certainly received a great stimulus. Study 
groups are being formed and in some places there 
are more than one group. The T-Method which 
Miss Taylor suggested and explained most clearly, 
seems very simple and practical. It is a method 
that can be used by any one who so desires. For 
the benefit of those who did not have the oppor- 
tunity to hear Miss Taylor demonstrate this meth- 
od, it will be printed at the end of this article. 

Miss Taylor was an inspiration to all who heard 
her. Her manner was simple and clear; her 
presentation of the subject was lucid, direct and 
appealing. Her classes left one with the feeling 
that the study of some part of the Bible must be 
continued. 

We feel that the Educational Department has 
been the greatest beneficiary of these six weeks 
and we are hoping for a more thorough study of 
the Bible and, as a result, a deepening of the 
spiritual life of the members of the Auxiliary. 

The six weeks have come and gone but the in- 
fluence of those weeks is but beginning. They 
were a wonderful six weeks for the Diocese. 
MAE WOOD WINSLOW, 

Educational Secretary. 
* * * 

A METHOD FOR DAILY BIBLE STUDY 

Directions : — Each passage of Scripture — a 
chapter or a shorter portion — is to be read four 
times. 

After reading the chapter the first time record 
in a note book — in your own words — a brief con- 
densation of the contents. Do not use over ten 
or fifteen words. 

The next day read it the second time to learn 
what truth the chapter teaches. 

The third day read it to select the best verse. 

Read it the fourth day to fix upon a title — a 
word or phrase— which will enable you to recall 
the contents of this portion of Scripture. 

The aim is to record in writing : 
1. The Thought or what is Told. 



2. The Truth or what is Taught. 

3. The Text or what to Take. 

4. The Title or what to Term it. 

Illustration : 
Read St. John 1:1-18. 

1. The Thought : The Eternal Word became 
man. He gives Eternal Life to all believers. 

2. The Truth: I became a child of God— a 
possessor of Eternal Life — by believing in 
Christ and receiving Him into my life. 

3. The Text. 1-12. 

4. The Title: The Word. 

St. John 15:7; 17:8,17. 

I. Peter 1:23-25. II. Timothy 3:14-17 

Psalm 19:7-14. Isaiah 55:10, 11. 

* * * 

CHRIST CHURCH, ELIZABETH CITY 

LENTEN services are being well attended this 
Lent. The Junior Choir of thirty-four child- 
ren are most faithful and doing good work. Dur- 
ing Lent these children are given special instruc- 
tion and in Holy Week are given a written exami- 
nation. Each Friday afternoon the rector, during 
the services, preaches a five minute sermon to 
children. 

As usual this Lent the rector has placed a little 
more than 150 books from his library on tables 
in the west end of the Church. These books are 
— 18 on Church history, 10 on missionary activi- 
ties and missionaries of the Church, 10 on prayer 
and meditation, 18 on Bible study, 12 on the Life 
of Christ, 20 on the spiritual life and 70 on general 
subjects. The congregation is urged to borrow 
these books and to be sure to read at least one 
before Easter. For many years the congregation 
has responded to this appeal and many books 
are borrowed and read. Only a note is left on the 
table by the borrower giving his name and the 
name of the book taken. During the years this 
custom has been followed the borrowers have al- 
ways returned the books borrowed when read 
and usually get others. Besides these books there 
are many pamphlets on various religious subjects 
to be given away. These books remain in the 
Church throughout Lent. 

This service has been of real value to many who 
would not otherwise have the opportunity to read 
books of this nature. 

# * * 

RESOLUTION 

RESOLVED, That the Diocese of East Carolina 
in Annual Convention assembled at Greenville, 
N. C. , endorses the plan of the Synod of the 
Fourth Province for a Provincial-wide Teaching 
Mission on the Great Commission and pledges this 
Diocese to participate in this movement. 



12 



The Mission Herald 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON INSURANCE. 

YOUR Committee on Insurance respectfully 
submit their report as follows: 
We have added during the past year to the 
Schedule policy several items of additional insur- 
ance, and at this time the total amount of insur- 
ance carried on account of the Schedule policy for 
the Diocese is .$89,750.00. 

From January 1, 1930, to December 31, 1930, we 
collected a total of $51.00 on account of the Sched- 
ule insurance, which amount is made up from the 
following items: 

Jan. 28, Calvary, Warsaw $10.00 

Feb. 3, All Saints', Fairfield 12.00 

Apr. 23, St. Clement's, Beaufort 5.00 

Nov. 26, St. Andrew's, Nags Head .... .. 6.00 

Dec. 4, Parish House, Hope Mills 12.00 

Dec. 5, St. Luke's, Winterville 6.00 

During the year 1930 we saved the Diocese 
considerable money by cancelling the insurance on 
buidings at Camp Leach, and adding it to the 
Schedule policy. This saving was due to the 
fact that the addition of this amount of insurance 
did not make any change in the average rate at 
which the Schedule policy is written. 

We regret that financial conditions in the Dio- 
cese has been such during the past year that we 
were not able to make collection from more parish- 
es and missions. We do hope though that condit- 
ions in 1931 will be such that we will be able to 
collect a large part of the back items, as well as 
the current items, covering the renewal of the 
insurance. 

Your Insurance Company is subject to call from 
any church at any time. When the insurance on 
your property is solicited and special inducements 
are offered you, we recommend that such propo- 
sition be submitted to your Committee. Your 
Committee, can, in all probability, working in 
harmony witih regular insurance agents, work 
out plans which will be just as favorable if not 
more so than any which may be submitted from 
outside influences. Your Committee earnestly 
desires to render to the very best of their ability 
a real service to each church and the Committee 
sincerely hope that they will be called upon. 

Your Committee desires to caution each parish 
and mission to exert the utmost care in seeing 
that their insurance does not lapse, because in 
times of depression the protection is neded far 
more than at any other time. 

JOHN BENNERS GIBBLE, Chmn. 



CAPTAIN TURNER, C. A. 

Ahoskie, N. C, Feb. 27, 1931. 

Capt. B. F. Mountford, C. A.. 
416 Lafayette St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Dear Captain Mountford : 

Capt. Fred A. Turner has been here in my field 
since the first week in January and I regret very 
much that he is leaving in a few days. He has 
been a great pal and companion with me in my 
work and a great source of spiritual help and in- 
spiration to me. 

I was delighted last Fall when Bishop Darst 
told me that he had arranged for him to come to 
this field. I felt that it was what we needed most. 
We have not been disappointed; but rather the 
outward results have been greater than we ex- 
pected. Attendance at the services have been very 
good. Some lives have been consecrated and some 
re-dedicated to His services. Lasting impressions 
have been made on both old and young, in the 
children's services, in the chapel exercises Capt. 
Turner has conducted in the local schools, in the 
homes visited he showed himself to be a true and 
living witness of Christ living an abundant and 
HAPPY life and always equal to every occasion. 
L^st but far from least, he made lasting impres- 
sions with his simple, dignified, sincere, inoffen- 
sive and yet very definite and uncompromising 
gospel messages. He shows by word and life what 
Jesus can make of men. 

These last three days of his stay here, he is 
giving services to the people in a mill village 
where they have had no regular preaching ser- 
vices heretofore for some time. He goes from 
here to a rural community in Martin County, (N. 
C.)» where the Church has a new mission and 
where there are more than twenty families living 
within two miles of the Mission House. Not more 
than three or four of the men, heads of these 
families, are members in good standing of any 
denomination, to say nothing of the other mem- 
bers of these families. This is a phase of the 
work of the Church Army that I see it doing and 
know that it is capable of doing here in East 
Carolina. Thank God for it. Depend on me as a 
friend and devotee of it. 

Yours sincerely, 

REV. LEON MALONE 
* * * 

ARE YOU? 

Are you preparing to do your part in making 
our Easter Offerings amount to 813,000.00? 



March, 1931 



IS 



ST. JOHN, EVANGELIST, EDENTON 

Mrs. E. A. V. Hermitage 

NO event of recent years in the activities of 
the Church has given more gratification and 
inspiration than the apparent "New Life" the 
Church is taking on during Lent. 

The services are well attended and much inter- 
est is being manifested, especially by some of its 
delinquents. 

The Woman's Auxiliary has inaugurated a new 
plan to have its meetings around to the homes of 
the members, thereby reaching those who possibly 
would not come otherwise. The rector, the Rev. 
S. N. Griffith, attends the meetings and is having 
Lenten readings on various subjects — "Prayer, 
Praise, Service." 

"Youth of the World Arise ! Clear is the Clarion 
Call ! I come, I come, true youth replies — To Him 
I give my all." 

A choir has been formed with children from the 
Parochial School and some adults. It is full of 
splendors and delight, and so uplifting to all to see 
and hear these "youths" as they march in and out 
of the Chancel, chanting the Canticles and singing 
the hymns in their first INITIAL STEP TO- 
WARDS PRAISING GOD. Their faces are radi- 
ant with joy and gladness. 

The Organist, Mrs. Griffith, and the choir lead- 
er, Mrs. Eff ie Muse, are zealously working in their 
rehearsals. 

May this choir live on and on, to sing their 
praises, and may they be as the "polished corners 
of the temple." 

Sweet voices, "Sing on your faithful watches 
keeping, sing us sweet fragments of the songs 
above: Till mjorning's joy shall end the night of 
weeping, and life's long shadows break in cloud- 
less love." 

* * * 

| Woniiae 9 § Anaxiliairy 



Mrs. George F. Hill, Elizabeth City, N. G. 
fublicity Chairman 



DEPARTMENT RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

THE Department of Religious Education of the 
Diocese of East Carolina under the direction 
of its Vice-Chairman, Rev. W. A. Lillycrop, Green- 
ville, N. C, secured the field worker of the De- 
partment of Religious Education of the Province 
of Sewanee, Miss Annie Morton Stout, to conduct 
two teacher training institutes in the Diocese 
during the month of January. One was held in 
St. Peter's Church, Washington, N. C, Rev. Steph- 
en Gardner, Rector. Another was held in Kin- 
ston, N. C, Rev. B. F. Huske, D. D., Rector. In 



both of these places, the teacher training insti- 
tutes lasted a week's time and churches from the 
surrounding areas, particularly the rural sections, 
sent their teachers in to take advantage of this 
splendid class conducted by Miss Stout. 

At the Convention of the Diocese held in Green- 
ville, Miss Stout also presented the work of Re- 
ligious Education to representatives of the entire 
Diocese. 

Miss Stout's work was considered so outstand- 
ing by the Department of Religious Education of 
the Diocese of East Carolina, they have requested 
her to return again to East Carolina next year. 

Sj$ 5fC SjS 

NOTES FROM THE STUDENT CENTER 

DURING LENT the Student Club is devoting 
the last part of the program each Friday 
afternoon to a Twilight Lenten Service. These 
services are held in the Student Center and con- 
ducted by Mr. Lillycrop. 

The Lenten Offering of the Bible Class will 
again go into the General Student Fund for Lent 
and will be sent to St. John's Medical School, 
Shanghai, China. 

During February our student group had the 
opportunity of having as guests two interesting 
and helpful personalities. On February 1st, Miss 
Annie Morton Stout spoke on Religious Education 
and on February 15th, Miss Angy Manning Taylor, 
one of the great Bible teachers in America ad- 
dressed the group. 

Marguerite Lane, of Vandemere, N. C, attended 
the Student Conference on Missions at Chapel 
Hill, February 27th to March 1st. 

* * * 

UNITED THANK OFFERING 

My dear United Thank Offering Treasurer: 

DO you realize what year this is? Well, it 
makes a big difference to us who are respon- 
sible for the United Thank Offering in the Diocese 
of East Carolina, for, being a General Convention 
year means that there is very little more time 
before the Denver Meeting, when we must turn in 
our Diocesan U. T. 0. for the Triennium of 1928- 
1931. It also means this year, that our fall Of- 
fering must be in my hands not later than Sep- 
tember first, since the Convention is to convene 
in September, much earlier than it usually does. 
Because of this, I would like you to finish up your 
spring Offering as early as possible, have the 
presentation without delay and send the Offering 
on to me, thus giving more time for our fall U. 
T. 0. 

If the New York Bank used by our National 
Treasurer is safe, then the U. T. 0. money coming 



14 



The Mission Herald 



in to me, hereafter, will be, for I am trusting the 
funds to no other banking house for safe keeping. 
My sad experience with closed banks, last fall, 
cured me of using local banks for any trust fund, 
though there may never be a repetition of such 
conditions. 

As stated in my report to the Greenville Meet- 
ing of our Auxiliary, the spring (1930) U. T. 0,, 
amounted to $1,779.46, of which $1,013.62 came 
from the Convocation of Wilmington, and $765.84 
from the Convocation of Edenton. The fall Of- 
fering, from the Convocation of Wilmington, 
$863.46; the fall Offering, from the Convocation 
of Edenton, $633.76, which, as you see, totals 
$1,497.22. 

The entire spring Offering is closed up in the 
Citizens' Bank of Windsor, while $1,012.52 of the 
fall U. T. 0. remains in the Bank of Windsor, 
which has re-opened and is liquidating its own 
affairs. I shall make every effort to secure as 
much as possible from both banks before the 
General Convention. The balance on hand, which 
I have forwarded to our national treasurer, Mr. 
Lewis B. Franklin, is S469.99. 

Please let's not leave any stone unturned to give 
every Auxiliary or Church woman or girl the op- 
portunity to make an offering of thankfulness 
through the U. T. O. channel between now and 
the time for presentation of our coming spring 
and fall Offerings. Remember, much of the Ad- 
vance Work of this wonderful Church of ours 
depends on the United Thank Offering. 
FOY A. SAWYER 
* * * 

To the Women of the Auxiliary: 

AT the annual meeting in Greenville the fol- 
lowing suggestions were made by the com- 
mittee on Recruiting which we hope will be carried 
out by the parishes as far as possible. 

1. That special intercession for new offer- 
ings of life and for the workers already in the 
field from the Diocese be made at the Celebration 
of the Holy Communion once each month. 

2. That an effort be made to secure the ser- 
vice of girls from this Diocese to serve as volun- 
teer workers in the mountain Missions of this or 
ajoining states for a specified period during the 
summer. This would bring the young life of the 
church in contact with the work and give them 
personal experience in regard to the need for such 
workers and of the opportunities presented for 
service in the church. 

3. Each Parish Branch is urged to have a 
chairman of Recruiting who shall serve as a chan- 
nel through which the Diocesan committee may 
function and who shall keep before the mind of 



the Parish Branch the subject of the monthly in- 
tercessions. 

We hope that you will take some action on this 
matter, so that there may be some one in each 
parish to whom may be sent imformation from 
time to time about the needs for workers in the 
field, and some one who will see that these needs 
a